03-14-2017 01:22 AM
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  1. Tom Westrick's Avatar
    p_20170102_170904.jpg
    Last year, I intended to upgrade my laptop to the new HP Spectre X360, but there was a critical issue: HP implemented the Thunderbolt 3 standard incorrectly, so trying to dock it to a USB-C hub and connect my second monitor became 20 minutes of begging the connector gods every time I needed to dock the laptop. After this, I evaluated the landscape for Windows laptops this year, and became frustrated: each of the flagship laptops and convertibles had some sort of flaw that made me hesitate buying them.

    At the same time, I’ve become aware of just what I do on my laptop: 95% of the time, I’m doing something within a web browser. Even when I’m writing papers for school in Microsoft Word, I have my browser on my second display to display the research for said paper. When I’m not doing school work, I’m catching up on news from my favorite websites or watching Netflix.

    Other than the few times I’ve tried Microsoft Edge (none of which lasted more than a day, for various reasons), I’ve been using Chrome as my browser for as long as I can remember. Legitimate battery life problems aside, Chrome is the best match for me: it’s the most secure browser, I trust Google’s privacy policy more than Microsoft’s, there are plenty of extensions and apps for my niche uses, and it’s always smooth.

    p_20170102_170855.jpg
    The Acer Chromebook R13, the first Chromebook I tried in earnest

    Chrome OS is Google’s unique answer to the laptop and desktop form factors: it’s essentially the Chrome browser, plus a few extra features like Bluetooth device and Wi-Fi management that need to be included in a full operating system. There have been criticisms that something that is “just” a browser can’t replace a full laptop operating system like Windows or MacOS, and these aren’t unfounded: the few times I’ve tried Chrome OS in earnest made me miss some feature from Windows. Even when I bought a Chromebox for my parents a few years ago, they loved how simple it was - but they needed something that would work with their USB printer. For me, I’ve always needed a certain Windows program either for college or for personal use. Last term, I had to have SQL Server installed on my laptop; there’s no way in hell that would work on Chrome OS. I also backup DVD and Blu Ray’s, something that can’t be done with Chrome OS.

    After being frustrated with the HP Spectre X360, I decided to try Acer’s Chromebook R13. It also includes a USB-C port for my home dock, features a 360 degree hinge for tablet use, and is one of the first Chromebooks to feature support for Android apps. For a lot of people, I think the Android app support will be crucial: by downloading the Microsoft Word app or Polarr Photo Editor, a Chromebook goes from covering 90% of a typical person’s usage to possibly reaching 100%. Word is a crucial example, since it’s the default word processing application for most users, and it works well. The Android app doesn’t have as many features as the desktop Windows version, but it has the essentials. If you’ve ever used the version of Word from the Windows Store, you’ll know what to expect.


    Relevant

    Setting up a Chromebook is dead simple: log into a Wi-Fi network, log into or create a Google account, and that’s it. From there, it will sync your Chrome bookmarks, theme and extensions if you’ve used the browser before. It will also check for and apply any OS updates, which is much easier compared to Windows. Whenever I’ve setup a Windows device in the past, it took about 30 minutes to an hour to download and install the necessary updates, even for my new gaming desktop that is plugged directly into my modem via Ethernet and has some of the fastest hardware you can put in a desktop right now. For both of the Chromebooks I’ve tried in the past month, downloading and installing updates didn’t take more than five minutes. All in all, the setup process didn’t take more than 10 minutes. With Windows, it takes me at least an hour to install necessary updates, turn off the unnecessary (to me) features like Cortana and OneDrive, and install my required programs. That’s assuming it grabs all the required updates the first time, which isn’t a guarantee.

    nimbus-image-1483926471012.jpg
    Nimbus Screenshot, a very helpful tool for ChromeOS

    With the Acer Chromebook R13, I decided to move to the beta channel of Chrome OS for the Android app support, and even that was painless: the update took a few minutes to download, a minute to install and I was up and running again. I did it on coffee shop Wi-Fi too, so it’d probably be even faster on my home network. There was an issue with my mouse connecting on the beta channel - which is not surprising for pre-release software - so I went back to the stable release. This involves re-downloading the stable version of the OS and factory resetting the device. I did all of this on the coffee shop Wi-Fi, and the entire saga of downloading the beta, discovering the problem with my mouse, resetting and installing the stable version, and setting the Chromebook up as new took all of ten minutes.

    Day to day usage is more pleasant than even high end Windows laptops, and is embarrassingly good compared to whatever Windows laptop could be bought for the same $400. I’ve used both the Chromebook R13 and HP Chromebook G1, and I’ll do a separate review on each. They both booted up within a second of me opening the laptop lid, and after a second to log in I was up and running. Installing any updates is a breeze: it will download in the background and you will be notified that an update is ready to install. Then, just continue whatever you were doing, and the update will install the next time you turn off the Chromebook. Windows 10 has become notorious for forcing computers to reboot whenever updates are ready to install, no matter what the user is doing. I agree that it’s important to keep users as up to date as possible with security patches, but the Chrome OS method of this is better since it gives users control on when the machine is rebooted. Again, even with installing updates the laptop takes only a minute to come back on and you can get back to whatever you were doing before.

    The security aspect is probably the most important reason I recommend someone use a Chromebook: since Chrome OS can’t run the same software a Windows laptop can, it also can’t get the same malware or viruses that Windows can. The only way to install any extensions or apps is through the Chrome Web Store or Play Store for models that support Android apps, and all apps run in their own container so they don’t harm the rest of the operating system. Even on the off chance something goes horribly wrong, factory resetting a Chromebook takes all of five minutes.

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    Using Desktop Word through Chrome Remote Desktop

    Part of the reason I can use a Chromebook as my laptop of choice is because I have a secondary Windows desktop at home serving as my media server and gaming PC. Chrome Remote Desktop is a Chrome app that does exactly what it says: it allows you to remote into a connection on another machine. This can be another Chrome OS device, or a Windows or MacOS computer. I use it for the one off program I need for college, and it works wonderfully. I was able to remote into my server PC while I was in the same crowded coffee shop from before, and I had no issues. I played a few rounds of Halo: Spartan Assault using the Chromebook keyboard and my Bluetooth mouse, and I was able to play it with zero input lag. I wouldn’t want to use this for more complex games like Grand Theft Auto or a multiplayer game like CounterStrike, but for simple games and the few programs I need it works wonderfully. For backing up DVD’s and Blu Ray’s, I’d have to be physically present at my desktop computer, or boot my Chromebook into a different version of Linux. This means I can’t use my Chromebook for 100% of the tasks I do, but I think this is better than having a Windows laptop: I have something low maintenance when I just want to read news or watch Netflix that I can do a majority of my work on, and I have a backup when I need something more powerful.



    Despite living in Texas (truck country) the past five years, I’ve driven a 2010 Kia Rio pretty much since I’ve lived here. For me, the Rio is perfect: it’s small and efficient, but can still fit a few people. For different reasons, I’ve moved every one and a half to two years since living in Texas, and I’ve either had to get a U-Haul, or borrow a truck from a friend. The availability of my friend’s truck and U-Haul lets me own an efficient car that suits my needs 99.9% of time, then upgrade to something more heavy duty for a specific task. Similarly, using a Chromebook suits my needs 99% of the time, and once I finish my degree it may be at 100%. In the meantime, I have my home PC I can remote into if I need a specific piece of software that isn’t available on Chrome OS.

    Microsoft is introducing a version of Windows for low powered ARM devices to combat Android’s dominance in mobile and Chrome OS’s rise in education and enterprise, and I don’t think that will go well. For both the OS maker and the end user, it’s better to start with something dead simple and secure and grow it to meet specific niches, rather than take a larger operating system that can do a lot and try to shrink it to run well on low power hardware. If you’re curious about using a Chromebook, try this: use nothing more than the Chrome browser, plus settings for Bluetooth devices or updates, and see how well it goes. If that meets all of your needs, you will enjoy a Chromebook.
    Guytronic, fatclue_98 and Timbre70 like this.
    02-20-2017 04:56 PM
  2. aj173's Avatar
    Well, yeah. That's who Chromebooks and iPads were meant for: people who use their computers for browsing the internet and little else. Although I'd be careful about trusting Google with your privacy any more than Microsoft. Keep in mind that Google basically invented the practice of monetizing user data, so caveat emptor.
    Axeelant likes this.
    02-20-2017 06:54 PM
  3. Tom Westrick's Avatar
    Well, yeah. That's who Chromebooks and iPads were meant for: people who use their computers for browsing the internet and little else. Although I'd be careful about trusting Google with your privacy any more than Microsoft. Keep in mind that Google basically invented the practice of monetizing user data, so caveat emptor.
    Microsoft also has an advertisement service they collect data for and profit from, and their privacy policy specifically states they share the data they collect with other companies.
    02-20-2017 09:21 PM
  4. papillrm's Avatar
    Tom, you lost me for about a second or two when I was reading about borrowing a truck and renting a U-Haul in Texas. But the analogy does work. I've lived a lot longer than you and could probably write a thick book just enumerating the Windows problems that I've lived through. Like you, I now use my last Windows machine as sort of an application server that I infrequently access through Chrome Remote Desktop. And like you suggest, I ended up making the switch to a Chromebook after I had intentionally gotten to the point that nearly everything that I did in Windows involved using the Chrome browser, a browser extension, a Web app, and/or a Chrome app. Unlike you, I no longer backup one form of file storage media onto another. For better or worse, it's all on Google Drive, which is probably one of the safest gambles that a fellow can make. Even though I have installed Play Store apps on my Asus C100PA-DB02, there are only a couple that I actually often use. But it's a nice option. Good luck on your degree.
    02-21-2017 02:25 PM
  5. cnashx's Avatar
    So... I have a HP Elite X3 and a Surface Pro4. I use the Elite X3 everyday and the Surface Pro4 only gets used for Word Processing, Movies/TV Streaming or Video/Picture Editing. The latter is the reason(s) I would never and could never switch to something like a Chromebook. Well, that and the fact that I could not seeing myself using Google anymore. I use my gmail address for junk email that I may need to access or sending an email to someone that I don't want to have my regular email addresses. The only google product I use occasionally besides that is Google Earth because there is no real replacement sadly, but I don't save ANY data there.
    02-21-2017 02:55 PM
  6. fatclue_98's Avatar
    Hey Tom,

    I just picked up the same Acer R13 Chromebook a few weeks ago. I did it because frankly, I needed to. I've used every platform there is so this was more of another notch in my belt than anything else. It's very zippy and all but I can see that ChromeOS wasn't optimized for 1080p. Text is tiny and I'm always having to pinch and zoom. I haven't gotten on the Beta Channel yet so I wanted to ask, how are the Android apps and how do they scale on a 13.3" FHD display?
    02-21-2017 04:17 PM
  7. Krystianpants's Avatar
    Microsoft also has an advertisement service they collect data for and profit from, and their privacy policy specifically states they share the data they collect with other companies.
    Could you point me to this? The advertising and sharing of information that you don't explicitly allow?
    I see people mentioning but no one ever has a reference.
    TgeekB, Guytronic and Tom Westrick like this.
    02-21-2017 06:34 PM
  8. worldspy99's Avatar
    I would love to use a Chromebook or an iPad and use the PC as a server. Unfortunately my professional needs can't be met with either of those two devices so I am kinda stuck using a Windows laptop (work issue) and a Surface Pro 3. One of these days I am going to get one for my kid, however currently the school recommends a PC as well so....
    02-21-2017 07:06 PM
  9. Guytronic's Avatar
    Could you point me to this? The advertising and sharing of information that you don't explicitly allow?
    I see people mentioning but no one ever has a reference.
    https://privacy.microsoft.com/en-us
    Laura Knotek and aximtreo like this.
    02-21-2017 08:17 PM
  10. TgeekB's Avatar
    Yup, your standard privacy policy.

    Sent from my Alcatel Idol 4S
    Guytronic likes this.
    02-21-2017 08:29 PM
  11. Guytronic's Avatar
    Yup, your standard privacy policy.
    It's pretty involved after reading through it somewhat.
    02-21-2017 09:29 PM
  12. Chintan Gohel's Avatar
    One big reason chromebook or anything similar won't spread rapidly - no internet

    When your internet is down, you're stuck, plain and simple - you can't do anything at all
    02-21-2017 11:29 PM
  13. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    One big reason chromebook or anything similar won't spread rapidly - no internet

    When your internet is down, you're stuck, plain and simple - you can't do anything at all
    Not true anymore - Can you use a Chromebook offline? | Android Central

    To be technical about it, for most people, not having an internet connection for their laptop, regardless what it is, is an issue.
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 02-22-2017 at 03:03 AM.
    Guytronic, aximtreo and jmshub like this.
    02-22-2017 02:47 AM
  14. Chintan Gohel's Avatar
    Not true anymore - Can you use a Chromebook offline? | Android Central

    To be technical about it, for most people, not having an internet connection for their laptop, regardless what it is, is an issue.
    Well, in my opinion, not having access to your files anywhere you go is an issue - hence a laptop with internal storage counts rather than a chromebook with minimal storage options

    Internet isn't available everywhere everytime and at the speeds needed - I have a crappy connection at home that rarely works as it should and I can't change that because there aren't other options available - I want to watch a 360p video on youtube, that will take 4 times longer to buffer than to watch - I'm better off getting the videos copied from someone's hard disk or flash drive
    02-22-2017 04:15 AM
  15. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Well, in my opinion, not having access to your files anywhere you go is an issue - hence a laptop with internal storage counts rather than a chromebook with minimal storage options

    Internet isn't available everywhere everytime and at the speeds needed - I have a crappy connection at home that rarely works as it should and I can't change that because there aren't other options available - I want to watch a 360p video on youtube, that will take 4 times longer to buffer than to watch - I'm better off getting the videos copied from someone's hard disk or flash drive
    Did you not read the article? Chrome has a file system. Chormebooks have hard disks. Android apps are available now with local storage. Chromeapps have local storage. Chromebooks have SD card slots and USB ports. What else do you need?

    I get you have a crappy internet connection. Anyone with one will have issues with any connected service. Which was my point.
    02-22-2017 04:25 AM
  16. Chintan Gohel's Avatar
    @Tom Westrick

    Is performance really that good? My laptop is an i7 with 8GB RAM, 1TB hard disk and 14 inch screen and it cost me 650USD which is a bit more than 50% more than your device which has 4GB RAM, 32GB internal memory and a media tek processor - I think I got really good value for what I spent
    02-22-2017 04:26 AM
  17. Chintan Gohel's Avatar
    Did you not read the article? Chrome has a file system. Chormebooks have hard disks. Android apps are available now with local storage. Chromeapps have local storage. Chromebooks have SD card slots and USB ports. What else do you need?

    I get you have a crappy internet connection. Anyone with one will have issues with any connected service. Which was my point.
    that model has 32GB which is low by today's standards
    02-22-2017 04:26 AM
  18. Giddora's Avatar
    Chrome is the best match for me: it’s the most secure browser, I trust Google’s privacy policy more than Microsoft’s,
    You do know that Google is one of very few companies that has actually broken their own privacy policies, right?

    Actually, their only way of profit is through invading your privacy.

    Chrome is also not the safest browser. Edge is the only browser that has no active exploits out in the wild.

    Other than those few flaws in your post, good luck!
    TgeekB and aximtreo like this.
    02-22-2017 06:02 AM
  19. shmsnh's Avatar
    Didn't Google introduce the low-level privacy settings only recently? From what I've read in Google's and Microsoft's policies, both create an advertising profile based on your usage. But, if I remember correctly, Google seems to implement changes that always require user intervention to stop tracking. I'm sure Microsoft does this as well, but in my experience, they were always very open about what they collect and how much control we have over it.

    Or, in other words, I've found it easier to manage my privacy settings with Microsoft than with Google. I don't have any idea about Apple personally, as I have not used their services (expect for trying some of those out for a short period).
    aximtreo likes this.
    02-22-2017 07:12 AM
  20. Krystianpants's Avatar

    Yes but you can opt out.

    Microsoft personalized ad preferences

    Which you can't do with Google as far as I can tell unless you stop using the service. Or clear search history constantly. But not sure if clearing the search history on google changes advertising since this information is already available to them and new searches will be.

    Google even uses information from e-mail and other items and those MS privacy settings say they DON'T do that.

    Google is worse than MS and those who keep trying to pretend otherwise are in denial.
    Guytronic, shmsnh and aximtreo like this.
    02-22-2017 07:27 AM
  21. Guytronic's Avatar
    Yes but you can opt out.

    I'm not arguing any for or against when it comes to privacy options on any platform.

    To me if you communicate via wireless there are no secrets.
    02-22-2017 11:36 AM
  22. Witness's Avatar
    This is a really nice write-up. Gotta say, a bit suspiciously nice write-up.

    Anyways, I've given ChromeOS a shot and I found it too limiting for myself. As for my kids, it would work, but my thought has always been to teach them computing skills that would extend to enterprise computing in the future. Also, seeing that you need screenshot app just to take a screenshot is kind of ridiculous to me when I just hit the "Print Screen" button the PC.

    Great that it works for you. Until the day comes where I can use Photoshop, Premiere on a CB that contains more than 32/64GB, it's not a consideration for me.
    02-22-2017 03:55 PM
  23. Tom Westrick's Avatar
    So... I have a HP Elite X3 and a Surface Pro4. I use the Elite X3 everyday and the Surface Pro4 only gets used for Word Processing, Movies/TV Streaming or Video/Picture Editing. The latter is the reason(s) I would never and could never switch to something like a Chromebook. Well, that and the fact that I could not seeing myself using Google anymore. I use my gmail address for junk email that I may need to access or sending an email to someone that I don't want to have my regular email addresses. The only google product I use occasionally besides that is Google Earth because there is no real replacement sadly, but I don't save ANY data there.
    That's fair, and yeah if you don't already use Google services the barrier to entry is that much higher. Though the only services you have to use is Gmail for login and the Chrome browser. No need to use Google Docs, Search, Maps, etc since you can just use Word, Bing and Bings Maps in their place.

    Hey Tom,

    I just picked up the same Acer R13 Chromebook a few weeks ago. I did it because frankly, I needed to. I've used every platform there is so this was more of another notch in my belt than anything else. It's very zippy and all but I can see that ChromeOS wasn't optimized for 1080p. Text is tiny and I'm always having to pinch and zoom. I haven't gotten on the Beta Channel yet so I wanted to ask, how are the Android apps and how do they scale on a 13.3" FHD display?
    I don't remember changing the resolution when I had my R13, but I tried 1080P on the new Asus Chromebook Flip and everything was tiny. I didn't keep it that way for more than a few seconds, so I didn't do any specific testing with Android apps.

    I would love to use a Chromebook or an iPad and use the PC as a server. Unfortunately my professional needs can't be met with either of those two devices so I am kinda stuck using a Windows laptop (work issue) and a Surface Pro 3. One of these days I am going to get one for my kid, however currently the school recommends a PC as well so....
    That's fair, and I can totally see my needs changing when I go through my career change later this year. If so, I'll survey the market and pick whatever Windows laptop suites my needs.

    Well, in my opinion, not having access to your files anywhere you go is an issue - hence a laptop with internal storage counts rather than a chromebook with minimal storage options

    Internet isn't available everywhere everytime and at the speeds needed - I have a crappy connection at home that rarely works as it should and I can't change that because there aren't other options available - I want to watch a 360p video on youtube, that will take 4 times longer to buffer than to watch - I'm better off getting the videos copied from someone's hard disk or flash drive
    I get that, but I do so much of my stuff online anyway. I'm an online college student, so our books, rubrics, and class discussions are all online anyway. If I'm going to be offline for a while, I need to download my rubric just like I would if I was using Windows.

    I don't like using cloud storage either, but physical hard drives fail as well. I keep all my school work saved in Google Drive on the off chance my hardware fails. It's just one less thing to worry about, especially since they include 100gb of Drive storage with a Chromebook.

    @Tom Westrick

    Is performance really that good? My laptop is an i7 with 8GB RAM, 1TB hard disk and 14 inch screen and it cost me 650USD which is a bit more than 50% more than your device which has 4GB RAM, 32GB internal memory and a media tek processor - I think I got really good value for what I spent
    Depends on what you do with it. I did return the R13 since it wasn't quite powerful enough to drive a second display with 20+ tabs open across 4 browser windows, but it was perfectly fine if I just used it as a laptop. The HP Chromebook G1 (m5, 8gb RAM), Asus Chromebook Flip C302 (m3, 4gb RAM) and Samsung Chromebook Plus (Rockchip ARM processor, 4gb RAM) work just fine for me. If I didn't need that many tabs and windows for my school work, I'd be using the R13 since the battery life is ludicrous.

    Keep in mind that the processor is only part of the equation. A hard disk drive is going to run slower than the flash storage in the Chromebook. Windows does a lot more and requires more processor power than ChromeOS. so ChromeOS will run smoother on the same hardware. There's also the time investment: ChromeOS is dead simple to get going and use, while Windows seemed to present problems when I really didn't have the time and just needed it to work, even on a high end ultrabook.

    You do know that Google is one of very few companies that has actually broken their own privacy policies, right?

    Actually, their only way of profit is through invading your privacy.

    Chrome is also not the safest browser. Edge is the only browser that has no active exploits out in the wild.

    Other than those few flaws in your post, good luck!
    If collecting data is their only way to profit, they're going to do everything they can to keep that data safe and maintain trust. Microsoft's privacy policy (under the advertisement section) specifically states they share data they collect with other companies. It doesn't matter how much I trust Microsoft, I also have to trust the companies they share with - and they only list a few. When I did my privacy comparison article in July, Yahoo was one of the listed companies. Because Microsoft only mentions a few companies and "others," how am I supposed to know if my data has been shared with Yahoo?

    I'll concede that Chrome as a browser is less secure than Edge as a browser, but ChromeOS and an entire operating system is more secure than Windows as a entire operating system since exploits simply can't run.

    Yes but you can opt out.

    Microsoft personalized ad preferences

    Which you can't do with Google as far as I can tell unless you stop using the service. Or clear search history constantly. But not sure if clearing the search history on google changes advertising since this information is already available to them and new searches will be.

    Google even uses information from e-mail and other items and those MS privacy settings say they DON'T do that.

    Google is worse than MS and those who keep trying to pretend otherwise are in denial.
    Google's "My Activity" hub launched in July.

    This is a really nice write-up. Gotta say, a bit suspiciously nice write-up.

    Anyways, I've given ChromeOS a shot and I found it too limiting for myself. As for my kids, it would work, but my thought has always been to teach them computing skills that would extend to enterprise computing in the future. Also, seeing that you need screenshot app just to take a screenshot is kind of ridiculous to me when I just hit the "Print Screen" button the PC.

    Great that it works for you. Until the day comes where I can use Photoshop, Premiere on a CB that contains more than 32/64GB, it's not a consideration for me.
    I'll take that first sentence as a compliment :) I've been doing reviews on different forums and a Medium page for a few years now, I just don't do too many Windows reviews since I mainly use Android.

    That's fair. I don't need a Razer Blade with a GTX 1060, and neither do most people. The existence of Chromebooks doesn't preclude the existence of other laptops, and as I mentioned above if I need something more powerful in the future, I'll move back to Windows.

    That app is actually unnecessary, as I found out right after publishing this. I searched for "ChromeOS Snipping Tool", which led me to that app. To find the shortcut - Ctrl+Shift+Switch Window (one of the function keys) - I had to search for "ChromeOS print screen."

    I will say, the Photoshop Elements app does a lot of the same functions that proper desktop Photoshop does, but the hardware just isn't there for Premiere.
    Last edited by Tom Westrick; 02-22-2017 at 05:32 PM.
    02-22-2017 05:20 PM
  24. Bologwp's Avatar
    Just curious, but why are you trying so hard to convince everyone here that a CB is all anyone needs? If it works for you, that is great, but reading through this thread, it sounds way too much like a sales pitch, JMT.
    Chintan Gohel likes this.
    02-22-2017 06:01 PM
  25. Giddora's Avatar
    If collecting data is their only way to profit, they're going to do everything they can to keep that data safe and maintain trust. Microsoft's privacy policy (under the advertisement section) specifically states they share data they collect with other companies. It doesn't matter how much I trust Microsoft, I also have to trust the companies they share with - and they only list a few. When I did my privacy comparison article in July, Yahoo was one of the listed companies. Because Microsoft only mentions a few companies and "others," how am I supposed to know if my data has been shared with Yahoo?

    I'll concede that Chrome as a browser is less secure than Edge as a browser, but ChromeOS and an entire operating system is more secure than Windows as a entire operating system since exploits simply can't run.
    They make their money on selling the data to the highest bidder. That's their entire income base right there. They don't state what data are being sold and to who.

    The Chrome browser is a big security hole, and so will ChromeOS when/if it ever catches on outside of a niche market. The first holes in ChromeOS was found 6 years ago... And when it gets interesting, there will be a lot more. Google isn't very good when it comes to securing their systems.
    02-22-2017 06:01 PM
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