11-02-2012 11:37 PM
  1. brmiller1976's Avatar
    Microsoft is sitting on over $50 billion, and generates between $3 billion and $5 billion per quarter.

    They should set aside $1 billion of that cash and announce a contest for US wireless carriers.

    The first carrier to sell 1 million Windows phones in 2013 receives a payment of $500 million ($500 per phone).

    The second carrier to sell 1 million Windows phones in 2013 receives a payment of $250 million ($250 per phone).

    The third carrier to sell 1 million Windows phones in 2013 receives $125 million ($125 per phone).

    The fourth carrier to sell 1 million Windows Phones in 2013 receives $65 million ($65 per phone).

    The fifth carrier to sell 1 million Windows Phones in 2013 receives $30 million ($30 per phone).

    Microsoft should take the remaining $30 million and spend it on grabbing the remaining "must have" apps that aren't yet on the platform.

    That would result in a BIG push by carriers (of all sizes and types) for Windows Phone, and the payout for the carrier who generates sales momentum first would be huge. The push would likely continue after the payouts, due to simple momentum, and we'd look at 7 to 10 million WP8s sold in 2013 in the USA... plus an end to the "top 50" app drought.

    Thoughts?
    11-02-2012 07:32 PM
  2. dkp23's Avatar
    No way, i would drop that kind of cash to carriers for selling phones.

    THis would go on top of all the marketing and advertising money that will be spent on windows phone.

    Too expensive, very fast way to throw away money.
    11-02-2012 07:37 PM
  3. brmiller1976's Avatar
    Microsoft spent over $1.5 billion in the advertising for the WP7 launch, and sold under 2 million phones during the campaign.

    This approach would sell over 5 million phones with 1/3 less expenditure.
    11-02-2012 07:46 PM
  4. independentvolume's Avatar
    Not a bad idea. The only problem I see is the possibility of tech blogs spinning it in a negative light.
    11-02-2012 08:14 PM
  5. Daniel Ratcliffe's Avatar
    Not a bad idea. The only problem I see is the possibility of tech blogs spinning it in a negative light.
    Microsoft could sell 999999999999999999999999999 Windows Phones in a minute, and if the tech blogs wanted to spin it into a negative, they would, saying "Oh, they sold these now, but they won't keep those sales going". Similarly, Apple could sell one iPhone in a year and they would be able to spin it into a positive... if they're that far up Apple's rear end...

    Microsoft could sell 999999999999999999999999999 iPhones in a minute
    Oh **** me... I didn't mean to type that...
    11-02-2012 08:17 PM
  6. brmiller1976's Avatar
    Yep. If Microsoft is at 5% of the market, they're slammed as "irrelevant." If they're at 35%, they're hammered as "desperately playing catch-up with Apple and Google, the true innovators." If they're at 90%, they're "evil monopolists who are intent on stamping out choice." Ignore the Mac press (and the vast majority of the press is Mac press, whether they admit it or not -- "journalists" who stand and cheer at Apple events).

    Besides, as we're constantly reminded, Apple is the largest and most powerful company in the world, with a HUGE cash pile. Google isn't broke either. If Microsoft's incentives frighten them, there's no reason they cannot respond (well, except for seeing their margins in their core device businesses plummet).
    11-02-2012 09:30 PM
  7. aubreyq's Avatar
    Don't like the idea. Also, what kind of company cares what tech blogs think about their business plans?
    11-02-2012 09:39 PM
  8. brmiller1976's Avatar
    I'm open to better ideas...

    And tech blogs are influential, especially when it comes to consumer products.

    The principal reason Windows Phone 7 bombed was because of relentless negative attention from the Apple and Google press.
    11-02-2012 09:54 PM
  9. aubreyq's Avatar
    And tech blogs are influential, especially when it comes to consumer products.
    I'd say they're influential but only to a small audience.

    The principal reason Windows Phone 7 bombed was because of relentless negative attention from the Apple and Google press.
    Dude you don't even believe that you wrote that. WP7 bombed due to poor marketing, not having a lot of popular apps or features (at least in the beginning), and poor carrier sales support, and an aversion of the public towards the Windows brand that Microsoft tarnished with Vista (which in this particular case Apple surely helped with tarnishing it).
    11-02-2012 10:14 PM
  10. baseballbert's Avatar
    Microsoft is sitting on over $50 billion, and generates between $3 billion and $5 billion per quarter.

    They should set aside $1 billion of that cash and announce a contest for US wireless carriers.

    The first carrier to sell 1 million Windows phones in 2013 receives a payment of $500 million ($500 per phone).

    The second carrier to sell 1 million Windows phones in 2013 receives a payment of $250 million ($250 per phone).

    The third carrier to sell 1 million Windows phones in 2013 receives $125 million ($125 per phone).

    The fourth carrier to sell 1 million Windows Phones in 2013 receives $65 million ($65 per phone).

    The fifth carrier to sell 1 million Windows Phones in 2013 receives $30 million ($30 per phone).

    Microsoft should take the remaining $30 million and spend it on grabbing the remaining "must have" apps that aren't yet on the platform.

    That would result in a BIG push by carriers (of all sizes and types) for Windows Phone, and the payout for the carrier who generates sales momentum first would be huge. The push would likely continue after the payouts, due to simple momentum, and we'd look at 7 to 10 million WP8s sold in 2013 in the USA... plus an end to the "top 50" app drought.

    Thoughts?
    I like it, that's a damn fine strategeree! Essentially guarantees on MS roi, and if they cleared their margin numbers, GIDDYUP!
    11-02-2012 10:57 PM
  11. a5cent's Avatar
    I've read that google, apple and MS have deals in place to incentivise sales staff ($$$ for each WP device sold) MS didn't do that last year, which apparently contributed much to their sales problems. I like the idea, but I'm sure apple and google could easily counter such a move with competitions of their own, assuming it is legal in the first place.
    11-02-2012 11:37 PM
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