The Windows 10 April 2018 update has arrived! Get the new Dell XPS 15, starting at $999.99
05-02-2013 05:44 PM
61 123
tools
  1. robotaholic's Avatar
    The Android version is not clunky at all. I have used it for 2 yrs and lost almost 40 pounds with it and made countless friends. I've seen it improve over that time because they release frequent updates. It integrates into my Facebook timeline, reminds me if I forget to log a breakfast and syncs the changes seamlessly with my Android tablets. The advertisement has never bothered me and I've never hit it on accident. On Windows Phone it doesn't have news feed or let you see your friends. Windows Phone App | MyFitnessPal.com

    At least it is available on all versions of Windows Phone:

    • Windows Phone 8
    • Windows Phone 7.5
    • Windows Phone 7
    gpstrucker likes this.
    04-24-2013 06:44 PM
  2. Eric The Fruit Bat's Avatar
    If that was the case, then why haven't we seen ISV's that implement a relatively trivial feature-selectable SMS alert tones per contact? Those were some of the first apps out of the gate for Andriod and iOS; especially from vendors who played in the Windows Mobile space years ago-and it's STILL one of the top requested features since WP7 was introduced. Since that time we've had two major releases, and still no native or thrid-party app support.

    What's even more infuriating is that even the late lamented Symbian Phones could do this with their limited app market years ago.

    What part of PHONE in Windows Phone does Microsoft not understand?
    04-24-2013 09:33 PM
  3. snowmutt's Avatar
    Won't it be great when this stops showing up in our forums????


    My Wife and I are happy with our WP 7's, and will see it through to the end of the contracts. But, there are some basic apps which just need to show up soon. Everyone here has heard me moan about my wife needing a true credit card reader for her start-up business. Hopefully, that becomes a non-issue by the Holidays or WP loses her, despite her dis-like of Android.

    My sons friends wanted WP, no Marvel Comics app- they went Android.

    I have had a few other examples, but it is just a bummer. I feel this is better and better, and the Windows 8 cross platform identity will solve this. I truly, truly do.

    But MS is letting it happen in it's time, which is painful for us.
    04-24-2013 10:19 PM
  4. spaulagain's Avatar
    Won't it be great when this stops showing up in our forums????


    My Wife and I are happy with our WP 7's, and will see it through to the end of the contracts. But, there are some basic apps which just need to show up soon. Everyone here has heard me moan about my wife needing a true credit card reader for her start-up business. Hopefully, that becomes a non-issue by the Holidays or WP loses her, despite her dis-like of Android.

    My sons friends wanted WP, no Marvel Comics app- they went Android.

    I have had a few other examples, but it is just a bummer. I feel this is better and better, and the Windows 8 cross platform identity will solve this. I truly, truly do.

    But MS is letting it happen in it's time, which is painful for us.
    There is no "letting happen." Its simply lack of market share. All the apps cost money and resources to develop and those companies have to justify those costs. At 3-5% market share for WP, they just can't justify that cost.

    In addition, Responsive Web Design is pushing more companies to just have a flexible web interface, not necessarily a app for specific devices.

    There is nothing MS can do to force these companies to build apps. All they can do is make it as easy as possible and with Windows Blue they will be greatly improving the easy compatibility between W8, WP8, and presumably Xbox.

    While people don't choose WP because of lack of apps, app developers don't choose WP because of lack of users. Its just like Windows vs OSX.

    Its going to take tine no matter what. IMO, no app is worth dealing with Android for.
    04-24-2013 10:35 PM
  5. Mike Gibson's Avatar
    I'm a developer and have a moderately complex XAML/Direct3D/C++ WP8 app in the Store so I thought I'd chime in. Note that I'm a MSFT fan and will never spend a dime on any AAPL product (I have hated that company/law firm for decades). First, the bad news. As others have noted already, MSFT's W8 and WP8 are caught in the proverbial chicken-and-egg scenario with regards to users and developers. There are no users because there are no apps and there are no apps because there are no users. That's bad enough but MS made it worse - they introduced a totally new API, WinRT/WinPRT. So, not only do devs have to justify developing for a small user base but they also have to justify learning a totally new API. That's a lethal double-whammy. Producing quality software requires experience with the tools and APIs ... and MS wiped out all the millions of manhours of Win32 experience with WinRT/WinPRT. In addition, the two implementations of WinRT and WinPRT are *not* compatible, so they've doubled the development effort! WinSock2 is available on WinPRT but not on WinRT (you have to use a new Windows Socket API with all its Async nonsense). There is a nice FilePicker in WinRT that seamlessly integrates with SkyDrive. On WinPRT there is no FilePicker API at all -- to access SkyDrive you have to use the Live SDK and write your own FilePicker. This makes no sense because on a Windows Phone, SkyDrive access is much more important due to the limited local storage space. In WinRT you can write a complete XAML+Direct3D in C++. In WinPRT you have to add a C# shell because C++ can't access the XAML APIs (apparently, this is due to WinPRT still using SilverLight guts for compatibility), and C# can't access Direct3D. I won't even mention the woeful Async file system APIs in both WinRT and WinPRT (literally orders-of-magnitude slower than their Win32 counterparts for complex operations). The list goes on and on.

    What absolutely baffles me is why MSFT went with the Windows kernel across all devices given that they tossed its greatest asset in the trash (the well-known Win32 API). It added extra bulk to the OS for no good reason since devs can't access most of it. They should have created a WinRT OS instead if that was the plan all along. At a minimum, the cost of the Windows kernel should have been paid back by complete compatibility across devices ... but that didn't happen either. All pain but no gain. The whole WinRT effect smacks of internal C# tech evangelists run wild over the Windows team. They produce a pantload of stuff, show it off to clueless upper management (e.g. create a five minute demo on how to write a Blog Reader applet - with no error checking or other real world dev concerns, of course), then that gets pushed to the Windows team to finish and support. Years ago the Windows team would throw that stuff in the trash (fellow devs may recall #define LEAN_AND_MEAN, that's the old Windows team in action). I guess that isn't the case anymore.

    The most frustrating thing of all? I see excellent performance in my C++ and Direct3D code on WP8. My app blows away my competitors' apps on Android and iOS. It reads and parses several MBs of data from its install directory at startup using the old C fopen() functions and it still starts up essentially instantaneously on my HTC 8X (I was pleasantly surprised). That's the Win32 APIs in action (the few that are supported). I keep the C#/WinPRT part as minimal as possible and focus on D3D for all rendering. In other words, going to the high performance Windows core was correct. It's WinRT/WinPRT that's the problem. All MSFT needed to do was create a core common XAML layout and rendering engine to replace USER and parts of GDI and leave the rest of the Win32 API available to apps. All the C# stuff belongs in a .NET middleware layer. Why they didn't do that is baffling. Devs would have been able to crank out complex, high quality apps quickly that scale across device types.

    Maybe Windows Blue will fix some of these problems. Maybe not. MSFT seems dead set on WinRT and there's only so much that can be fixed there. We may be witnessing something that will be discussed in college business classes in a decade or two.

    Anyway, that's my unsolicited two cents.
    04-24-2013 11:52 PM
  6. spaulagain's Avatar
    I'm a developer and have a moderately complex XAML/Direct3D/C++ WP8 app in the Store so I thought I'd chime in. Note that I'm a MSFT fan and will never spend a dime on any AAPL product (I have hated that company/law firm for decades). First, the bad news. As others have noted already, MSFT's W8 and WP8 are caught in the proverbial chicken-and-egg scenario with regards to users and developers. There are no users because there are no apps and there are no apps because there are no users. That's bad enough but MS made it worse - they introduced a totally new API, WinRT/WinPRT. So, not only do devs have to justify developing for a small user base but they also have to justify learning a totally new API. That's a lethal double-whammy. Producing quality software requires experience with the tools and APIs ... and MS wiped out all the millions of manhours of Win32 experience with WinRT/WinPRT. In addition, the two implementations of WinRT and WinPRT are *not* compatible, so they've doubled the development effort! WinSock2 is available on WinPRT but not on WinRT (you have to use a new Windows Socket API with all its Async nonsense). There is a nice FilePicker in WinRT that seamlessly integrates with SkyDrive. On WinPRT there is no FilePicker API at all -- to access SkyDrive you have to use the Live SDK and write your own FilePicker. This makes no sense because on a Windows Phone, SkyDrive access is much more important due to the limited local storage space. In WinRT you can write a complete XAML+Direct3D in C++. In WinPRT you have to add a C# shell because C++ can't access the XAML APIs (apparently, this is due to WinPRT still using SilverLight guts for compatibility), and C# can't access Direct3D. I won't even mention the woeful Async file system APIs in both WinRT and WinPRT (literally orders-of-magnitude slower than their Win32 counterparts for complex operations). The list goes on and on.

    While I understand your pain for having to learn a new API and the conflicts with WP's API, I think you misrepresent WinRT and its potential.
    Yes, Microsoft really did reinvent Windows from the ground up. While WinRT does require you to relearn things, its also very valuable in many respects.
    First off, its a much more secure environment. Applications are contained in a sandbox and require user permissions to access files, etc.
    The biggest benefit from WinRT though is that it opens a huge door for developers in the long run. It now puts HTML/JavaScript on an equal level of traditional languages such as C#, XAML, etc. This is extremely powerful because it allows a very large pool of web developers to now create native Windows 8 apps. These "web based" apps have all the same luxuries of API access as the traditional model. Something that was never possible before, and in competitor OSes like iOS, very limited. HTML/JavaScript are now first class citizens with Windows 8.
    I can see how it would slow down initial development for existing developers because they have to relearn some things, but in the long run it will greatly pay off.
    I'm a UI designer and front end Web Developer, being able to create native Windows 8 apps with my abilities is cool as hell. Also, Visual Studio is an amazing tool. I've just started getting into it on a project with my Dad who is a .NET developer. We're working with the MVC model and its awesome that the both of us can bring our two very different development worlds together.
    I agree that the Windows --> Windows Phone aspects need to be more seamless and that is their plan. Hopefully Windows Blue will bring a lot of that to the table. But I think WinRT is a good thing.
    a5cent likes this.
    04-25-2013 12:46 AM
  7. Lisa_Pinguo's Avatar
    WP is a little boy when compare with Android and iOS, it needs more time to catch up.

    Some apps are new to the new OS and those developers also need more time.
    04-25-2013 04:26 AM
  8. falconrap's Avatar
    If WP8 continues to grow at the current pace, or faster (which I suspect will happen when the 928 is released on Verizon), then developers won't really be able to ignore the platform much longer. Let's face it, iOS and Android are saturated with apps. When you have a user base of 30 million plus users on WP, it's already becoming hard to ignore, especially if your Android/iOS app can fill a void on WP. If the user base grows another 10 million or so this quarter, it becomes even harder to ignore. Having 3% market share is only a detriment when the market is small. As it keeps growing and, WP keeps growing its base, the raw number of potential customers becomes large enough to force developers to take notice.

    Having done development work, but not for mobile apps, and used languages such as C/C++, Basic, VisualBasic, Cobol, LabView, LabWindows/CVI, and HTML, the one thing I have learned is that simply focusing on the syntax required to do a particular thing isn't that hard. Except for when some significant hurdles exist in the code and you have to figure out a work around. Just look at some of the leaks and recent releases and it's clear that more and more apps are coming, especially ones that make a difference. Hulu is on the way, as is Tapatalk. I don't know what some see, but I see an acceleration of big titles mixed with indies hitting the market.

    Once Android starting selling in numbers similar to what WP8 is just now selling in, it took about a year for Android to start really pulling in the developers. I figure WP8 will be a must on most developers' lists by the end of this year, especially if the user base is in the 50-70 million user range, which is pretty likely with the current growth curve. Somehow, Android managed to sell all those phones with its own app issues during the day, and WP8 looks to be following the same path.
    eric12341 likes this.
    04-25-2013 05:17 AM
  9. o4liberty's Avatar
    I have never been a heavy app user on any platform but for me the selection on WP8 is a whole lot better than what blackberry has to offer. I do agree for WP to be competitive they need to grow the app store and get some common features that they lack.
    04-25-2013 05:45 AM
  10. a5cent's Avatar
    @spaulagain
    @mike gibson

    What absolutely baffles me is why MSFT went with the Windows kernel across all devices given that they tossed its greatest asset in the trash (the well-known Win32 API). It added extra bulk to the OS for no good reason since devs can't access most of it. They should have created a WinRT OS instead if that was the plan all along. At a minimum, the cost of the Windows kernel should have been paid back by complete compatibility across devices ... but that didn't happen either. All pain but no gain.
    Mike, you've described exactly where WP is intended to go. It just isn't there yet. Unfortunately, W8 was developed with an almost complete disregard for anything done by the WP team, so WP8 and W8 are not as similar as they should have been. IMHO Windows Blue exists only as a correctional effort to remedy that problem, which shouldn't have occurred in the first place. As such, Windows Blue is mostly about developers like yourself, not about end users.

    Many people feel that having a unified kernel is meaningful accomplishment. Although that is true, it is currently meaningful to almost nobody outside of Microsoft. So far, the most important benefit to having a shared kernel has been the ability to use the same .NET runtime environment on both W8 and WP8. That is a very important step, but it is just one necessary step of many.

    First off, its a much more secure environment. Applications are contained in a sandbox and require user permissions to access files, etc.
    The permissions you refer to are only a question of the app model and the available APIs. At least theoretically, any program in any language could share those same security features, because ultimately, those features are implemented by the OS. It's just a matter of providing access to those features through other means than solely through the implementation of WP's .NET class libraries. By the time Windows Blue arrives, that is exactly what we should have on WP.

    Of course .NET apps do enjoy some security features that native apps will never have, but they are almost entirely related to runtime memory management. I would argue that those security benefits aren't really that important for systems that pull all their apps from a controlled app store. Such security features are much more important on systems that can run apps originating from anywhere, such as Windows or Android.

    The biggest benefit from WinRT though is that it opens a huge door for developers in the long run. It now puts HTML/JavaScript on an equal level of traditional languages such as C#, XAML, etc. This is extremely powerful because it allows a very large pool of web developers to now create native Windows 8 apps.
    From mike's and my perspective, anything executed in a .NET runtime environment is far removed from being a native app. Many of the issues Mike referred to are consequences of .NET applications not being native. People that work with .NET languages or HMLT/JavaScript aren't creating native apps, and they will be somewhat limited in the things they can achieve as a result.

    That doesn't change any of the positive aspects you mentioned though, which are certainly also true.
    04-25-2013 07:36 AM
  11. jlzimmerman's Avatar
    I understand why we make threads like this and converse to discuss shortfalls and disabilities of WP8 or its growth. It's good and healthy, but what I hope is also happening is that you make your voice be heard and give your suggestions to Microsoft. Or give your feedback HERE, or use Contact Us HERE.
    04-25-2013 08:16 AM
  12. Connie Litrenta's Avatar
    That's pretty much how I am seeing it. I do love the UI and how WP works overall. I am concerned the apps situation just may never improve.
    Sure hope you're wrong about that because I'd love to see WP succeed. My biggest complaint is more with Mobile Office and there is NO excuse for that one since it's Microsoft's own app. I use this a lot and the Android Office apps have more functionality. I can't even add/delete rows in Excel. Really? C'Mon Microsoft. I plan on sticking with my Lumia 920 as I love the phone really but I really hope I see improvements soon. Oh and I do wnat to thank MS for giving me something that I CAN'T get anywhere else - rooms. I suppose a lot of people don't use this feature but it is invaluable when communicating with my technology impaired hubby.
    04-25-2013 08:28 AM
  13. Connie Litrenta's Avatar
    Android has a lot of apps going for it but I am often times reminded about why I'm using WP8 when I get on my Android Tablet and experience those pesky little "Force Closes". So not missing those.
    04-25-2013 09:02 AM
  14. spaulagain's Avatar
    @spaulagain
    @mike gibson

    From mike's and my perspective, anything executed in a .NET runtime environment is far removed from being a native app. Many of the issues Mike referred to are consequences of .NET applications not being native. People that work with .NET languages or HMLT/JavaScript aren't creating native apps, and they will be somewhat limited in the things they can achieve as a result.

    That doesn't change any of the positive aspects you mentioned though, which are certainly also true.
    I think you and I are referring to a native app differently. When I say native app, I'm not referring to an app that runs at the most core level of the OS or machine language, I'm talking about an app that is specifically designed for that OS vs a web application.

    I think native applications in the manner you are referring to are a dieing breed maybe only used for core functions on specific applications.
    04-25-2013 09:15 AM
  15. Mike Gibson's Avatar
    Mike, you've described exactly where WP is intended to go. It just isn't there yet. Unfortunately, W8 was developed with an almost complete disregard for anything done by the WP team, so WP8 and W8 are not as similar as they should have been. IMHO Windows Blue exists only as a correctional effort to remedy that problem, which shouldn't have occurred in the first place. As such, Windows Blue is mostly about developers like yourself, not about end users.
    W8 is a better implementation of the whole *RT concept than WP8. It has FilePickers, etc. along with D2D and WIC. In my WinPRT C++ app I had to dig up some ancient libpng code to load .PNG files into my D3D textures. Ridiculous. This inconsistent and incomplete implementation across platforms would be excusable if MSFT was a tiny, overworked startup ... but MSFT has 90,000+ employees and WinRT/WinPRT are *strategic* platforms. Basically, if Windows fails then the heart will have been ripped out of MSFT. It will take 10-20 years but it will surely die.

    Many people feel that having a unified kernel is meaningful accomplishment. Although that is true, it is currently meaningful to almost nobody outside of Microsoft. So far, the most important benefit to having a shared kernel has been the ability to use the same .NET runtime environment on both W8 and WP8. That is a very important step, but it is just one necessary step of many.
    The .NET runtime is just a middleware layer. It could sit on top of a mini kernel, not Windows, so that can't be a justification. The only reason for a Windows kernel is to allow C++ programmers lower-level access to the Win32 APIs, which they've significantly restricted. Why have it at all? I have to laugh when I see people ask "where is PhotoShopRT?" and other questions like that. WinRT is *incapable* of supporting such complex apps, by design. Want to add a filter pack to PhotoShopRT? Good luck with that. RT apps can't load DLLs outside their installation and you can't install DLLs into another RT app, so everything has to be in the initial distribution. In addition, RT image support is tied to the underlying hardware, which means you can't load bitmaps larger than the underlying texture support (which is 2048 to 4096 pixels for lower-end hardware) without doing your own tiling. You should see all the poor devs on MSDN asking about why they can't load a photo in their RT app. And the TextBlock limitation to the supported texture height is simply the result of incompetence. How to display an almost unlimited number of lines of text was solved decades ago.

    Why the implementation of WinRT and WinPRT is so amateurish is beyond me. These are strategic platforms for MSFT and should have been treated that way by upper management. In his prime, if someone had gone to a design meeting with BillG and presented WinRT/WinPRT as implemented, BillG would have torn them a new one (I know people that came out of those meetings ... and they sometimes walked funny:). They might have been fired on the spot.
    04-25-2013 10:09 AM
  16. inteller's Avatar
    It was a quaint thing to say WP needs more time two years ago. Today it just sounds naive. If developers aren't writing apps for it now, chances are they never will.
    04-25-2013 11:02 AM
  17. a5cent's Avatar
    The .NET runtime is just a middleware layer. It could sit on top of a mini kernel, not Windows, so that can't be a justification.
    You are missing a few important issues.

    WP7 used the .NET compact framework. For years Microsoft has been trying to keep that halfway in sync with the desktop version and never achieved that goal. Keeping the two in sync is a gargantuan task that simply isn't financially feasible. If Microsoft really wants cross platform capabilities on WP and Windows, then they need a more cost effective solution.

    The thing is, the .NET runtime was never designed to be as portable across systems as was the java platform. The runtime environment and Windows aren't really separate entities. One example of this is the extent to which the .NET runtime makes direct calls into MinWin. The two are "baked" together. So, the only viable solution Microsoft really had was to bring MinWin over to WP, and MinWin includes the kernel.

    The only reason for a Windows kernel is to allow C++ programmers lower-level access to the Win32 APIs.
    I was a C++ programmer and I would disagree. Most of the OS doesn't run in kernel mode. That includes all of the API surface exposed by Win32. If you look at Microsoft's architectural diagrams of Windows, you will find Win32 sitting at least one layer above the kernel.

    I think you and I are referring to a native app differently. <snipped> I think native applications in the manner you are referring to are a dieing breed maybe only used for core functions on specific applications.
    Yes, that is exactly it.

    I understood what you meant, but I don't find your usage a common one. Even here on WPC, which isn't a developer site, the term "native" clearly refers to code that runs directly on the CPU without requiring a runtime environment. That is exactly what all those articles mean when they refer to WP8's support for native code (mainly gaming related).

    Whether a person views native applications as a dying breed or not, depends largely on their field of work. Microsoft prefers not to eat their own ".NET dogfood", so 99% of anything coming from the largest software company in the world is native code. One of the largest software fields, the traditional gaming industry (which is still growing), is almost exclusively native code based. That is unlikely to change anytime soon. Even most consumer applications on PC's remain native code based to this day.

    The web and enterprise applications (where developer efficiency is far more important than software efficiency) is where native code isn't just dying, but has been dead already for quite a few years.
    04-25-2013 11:37 AM
  18. a5cent's Avatar
    It was a quaint thing to say WP needs more time two years ago. Today it just sounds naive. If developers aren't writing apps for it now, chances are they never will.
    I don't think we can say never, but otherwise agree. People still expecting WP to catch up with iOS and Android in the apps department will be disappointed. It never was a realistic expectation. WP needs to carry and sell itself based on its own merits as an OS, and whatever Microsoft themselves decide to deliver exclusively for WP (which doesn't seem to happening right now).

    Apps won't ever be WP's strong suite. For that iOS and Android have just had too much of a head start.
    FinancialP and Residing like this.
    04-25-2013 11:41 AM
  19. Lumiaddict's Avatar
    I don't think we can say never, but otherwise agree. People still expecting WP to catch up with iOS and Android in the apps department will be disappointed. It never was a realistic expectation. WP needs to carry and sell itself based on its own merits as an OS, and whatever Microsoft themselves decide to deliver exclusively for WP (which doesn't seem to happening right now).

    Apps won't ever be WP's strong suite. For that iOS and Android have just had too much of a head start.
    Everyone has their own opinion
    04-25-2013 11:45 AM
  20. a5cent's Avatar
    Everyone has their own opinion
    Maybe I shouldn't have said "ever be WP's strong suite". Things can change. History is on my side of that argument however. It's happened hundreds of times before, and wishful thinking isn't likely to change the outcome. Microsoft is huge, but not even they can change how markets work.
    Last edited by a5cent; 04-25-2013 at 01:25 PM. Reason: spelling
    04-25-2013 12:13 PM
  21. sandmanfvr's Avatar
    Glad to see developers post in here as I like to hear others in IT (not a coder myself) tell their issues. Windows Blue. The big "magic bullet" seemingly is being looked at as the big catch all and man I hope it delivers. I am happy with the apps as is, but of course me as a user have different requirements for apps so others will be disappointed in apps. To me Windows Phone has always been about features that old blackberry os (per blackberry 10), android and ios have. I want a notification center that is good on top of the live tiles and that is toast. It needs to work better or well work at all. Next the os needs basic features as uploading videos to social media, notification sounds, beefier email features (saw GDR2 adding some so that is good), and finally more social media features in the people hub. I am wondering if the development issues stated here is make Microsoft slow down till Blue comes out?

    Unfortunately I have been here before, 2 years ago or so with my HTC Arrive. After 7.5 came out, not much was happening and really I got bored and left as I didn't see Microsoft doing much. Now WP8 is so great, but in the end the OS is lagging way behind and even with the new apps, Microsoft is kicking developers in the stomach with another revamp in Blue hoping it fixes it all. Blackberry 10 was my first choice and gave WP another go and it isn't horrible, but I do see features in Blackberry 10 that WP don't have an even with Blackberry 10's lack of apps, the ability of having the android runtime makes that a moot point. I am hoping on BLue but I think I decided to watch craigslist and pick my up a z10 and give it a try in month or so as they are already showing up for $400 or less here and there. I am like others and WANT WP to succeed, but I think the app argument, which was great by the topic starter here, is just a piece of a bigger picture. I was really shocked when I came back that alot was the same in the os. So I guess I end my rambling, I am good at that lol, with Windows Blue SHOULD fix it, but in the end time will tell.
    04-25-2013 03:14 PM
  22. Nick_1020's Avatar
    Pretty happy with the app situation on WP. Most days have seen updates and improvements so it shows that developers are paying attention and are serious about bug fixes.

    Would be nice to have a dedicated banking app, Tapatalk (possibly on the way) plus a few games that are popular on other platforms. My #1 bugbear is the lack of a really decent and comprehensive exercise app with heart rate monitor support...apparently, that's on the way too.
    04-25-2013 03:54 PM
  23. a5cent's Avatar
    Windows Blue. The big "magic bullet" seemingly is being looked at as the big catch all and man I hope it delivers.
    Windows Blue and WP's version of the same will do a lot for developers. I'm not sure what consumers will think. I have a hunch many will view all the new features as long overdue and already be looking towards WP9 even before WP Blue is released.

    Microsoft is in quite a bind. All they can do is try and make it as easy as possible to port metro applications between desktops, laptops, tablets and phones. However, that won't entice developers to port their apps from Android or iOS, nor will it suddenly cause developers to target WP as their primary mobile OS. Users expecting large and sudden changes on the apps front will be disappointed. The only thing that can change that, is either Windows tablets or Windows phones taking of with a growth rate ten times of what it is now.

    WP Blue is just another important step, but I don't think it is a silver bullet. As others have mentioned, WP is currently in a vicious chicken-and-egg spiral. So far Microsoft hasn't been able to break out of that spiral. I don't see what WP Blue brings to the table that might change that.

    Like I've been saying all along, Microsoft can't change economics. Throwing money at app developers has been making the problem even worse. Microsoft has but one way out, and that is to offer two or three of their own killer applications that people desperately want and would consider switching to WP for. Anything short of that won't cut it. So far I see no signs of them doig that though.

    On the other hand, just like you, I'm not one of those with an apps problem either. I get along just fine with WP's current app selection.
    04-25-2013 04:33 PM
  24. Ridlah's Avatar
    We also get apps late like when Draw Something finally hit Windows phone I got it and my friends said that game was last years thing. Apps are pretty expensive too and I understand that its because the developers need the money but they don't even update to support bugs and give new features as fast as they do on android and ios. The biggest issue is that Microsoft didn't put native coding in windows phone 7.8 which is capable of running it. The way I see it is I can upgrade to a new wp8 and only get slightly more apps than the ones already in the wp7 market place or I can upgrade to an iPhone or Android and have more apps.
    04-25-2013 09:34 PM
  25. FinancialP's Avatar
    Maybe I shouldn't have said "ever be WP's strong suite". Things can change. History is on my side of that argument however. It's happened hundreds of times before, and wishful thinking isn't likely to change the outcome. Microsoft is huge, but not even they can change how markets work.
    No I think you are 100% correct. Android has been chasing the App Store for years, and they still haven't caught up. IOS still has a ton of exclusives.
    04-25-2013 10:14 PM
61 123

Similar Threads

  1. Get This Free App!
    By cyberlmq in forum App Spotlight
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-24-2013, 06:49 AM
  2. New Lumia 800 owner with few questions about Apps
    By TortueG in forum Nokia Lumia 800
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-23-2011, 02:47 PM
  3. Question about apps and security
    By jleebiker in forum Developers Corner
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-22-2011, 01:57 AM
  4. Get Things Done apps?
    By ctt1wbw in forum Applications
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-06-2011, 04:05 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD