1. Windows Central Question's Avatar
    It seems from the growing popularity of android that microsoft is unable to develop good OS so that best and custmised app can be developed.

    Why every app first comes in android and apple market.

    In india i seen every govt. App come first in android and apple.

    Further, why microsoft need to do such insider build. I never heard that android and i phone do like that. They directly realease to public only after internal tests.

    Why windows OS is not reliable on windows phone
    06-06-2017 03:27 AM
  2. Henry Linc's Avatar
    I think it's because of different manufactures.
    06-06-2017 05:01 AM
  3. Drael646464's Avatar
    Android is about to implement beta testing in its new deployment model, and ios already has it (they just call it beta). Insider builds help MSFT develop a better product, and also to take feedback directly from consumers (including via the feedback hub). It's part of MSFT focusing more on what consumers experience and want, and including us in the process, rather than just giving us stuff we don't want, find use for, or that has bugs.

    Its basically a way of involving users, rather than just telling us what we want. Take for example wordflow on tablets, or landscape tiles mode on the phone - both things users have asked for, both are now on there way to the platform. Or the Bluetooth problem on the 950 - feedback and insider builds have allowed MSFT to fix those issues, where android phones experiencing such problems would be simply left to suffer, or at the mercy of their OEMs firmware updates, or android updates.

    Apps are designed and developed by third parties. Less people develop for win10m, because less people own the phones. It has nothing to do with the OS code itself.
    People focus where the money is.
    More users- equals more profit.

    Although equally, windows users are more likely to pay for apps according to some stats I have seen, and its a less competitive app market, so developers really should consider it; economically (I've seen suggestion developers for windows 10m actually make more money than the average android developer) - its actually pretty hard to make a living from coding mobile apps, and especially when via xamarin and c sharp they can code for all three platforms more easily that writing separated for each - they should be coding for all three to maximise their chances of success IMO.

    I am glad you are eager to learn, and I hope you learn a lot here on the forums.
    06-06-2017 05:56 AM
  4. Vinod Lohar1's Avatar
    Is it hard to develop app for windows phone than android
    06-07-2017 02:19 AM
  5. Drael646464's Avatar
    Is it hard to develop app for windows phone than android
    No, you can write UWP in c sharp, and via xamarin 2.0 write apps for all three platforms re-using up to 90 percent of code for apps across all platforms. Visual studio even gives your virtual device displays of what the app will look like on each platform.

    c sharp is no harder than java, in fact they are quite similar languages. It's probably easier to write UWP for csharp than write separate ios and android apps. And if you design your UWP to scale well, you can get it on xbox, HoloLens, hub, tablet/pc as well.

    It's partly just that windows phone is only 2% or so userbase, and only about 1/3 of desktop users use UWP yet, and the platform is 2 years old.

    UWP is different from android and ios, in that its a universal platform. It's as much a replacement for win32's on the desktop as it is a platform for windows mobile. People take time to adjust, developers and users both, and its a big change from the old windows ways of doing things. For just two years young its doing pretty well.

    Another part of the problem is its often perceived as a 'mobile' platform, when its actually not. Its a cross-device platform.

    MSFT has some plans to accelerate the adoption of UWP, including windows on arm on tablets, and windows s in education, timeline as well. They also have developed the centennial bridge for win32s to port over, and the islandwood bridge for ios apps to port over. MSFT is doing what they can to encourage people to see the new way, and some of its strategies have yet to be released.

    I expect windows on arm, released late this year will have an impact, by giving laptops and tablets mobility functions like a phone.
    06-07-2017 05:53 AM
  6. Henry Linc's Avatar
    Originally posted by Drael646464
    Originally Posted by Vinod Lohar1
    Is it hard to develop app for windows phone than android
    No, you can write UWP in c sharp, and via xamarin 2.0 write apps for all three platforms re-using up to 90 percent of code for apps across all platforms. Visual studio even gives your virtual device displays of what the app will look like on each platform.

    c sharp is no harder than java, in fact they are quite similar languages. It's probably easier to write UWP for csharp than write separate ios and android apps. And if you design your UWP to scale well, you can get it on xbox, HoloLens, hub, tablet/pc as well.

    It's partly just that windows phone is only 2% or so userbase, and only about 1/3 of desktop users use UWP yet, and the platform is 2 years old.

    UWP is different from android and ios, in that its a universal platform. It's as much a replacement for win32's on the desktop as it is a platform for windows mobile. People take time to adjust, developers and users both, and its a big change from the old windows ways of doing things. For just two years young its doing pretty well.

    Another part of the problem is its often perceived as a 'mobile' platform, when its actually not. Its a cross-device platform.

    MSFT has some plans to accelerate the adoption of UWP, including windows on arm on tablets, and windows s in education, timeline as well. They also have developed the centennial bridge for win32s to port over, and the islandwood bridge for ios apps to port over. MSFT is doing what they can to encourage people to see the new way, and some of its strategies have yet to be released.

    I expect windows on arm, released late this year will have an impact, by giving laptops and tablets mobility functions like a phone.
    Yeah, Microsoft is doing as best as they can to attract developers.
    06-07-2017 06:18 AM
  7. 1q2w3e4r5t6y7's Avatar
    I really think that it's because of different manufactures.
    06-13-2017 01:41 AM

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