1. Darin Hamel's Avatar
    Whats up with the blazing light when I am trying to go to sleep? I set my watch for sleeping and sometimes the light under the band lights up and normally in the day you dont notice it, but at night its like a terrifying spot light when you least expect it.
    01-10-2015 01:58 PM
  2. realwarder's Avatar
    Heart rate meter. Every 5 mins while sleeping I think. Ignore it and go to sleep :)
    01-10-2015 02:24 PM
  3. rhapdog's Avatar
    A light like that would prevent me from being able to sleep. I charge my Bluetooth earpiece in an enclosed wooden box, because I can't handle the light across the room. Can't handle the LED from a nightstand clock even. That would be a deal breaker for me. I need pitch black for sleeping.
    01-10-2015 03:00 PM
  4. 11B1P's Avatar
    A light like that would prevent me from being able to sleep. I charge my Bluetooth earpiece in an enclosed wooden box, because I can't handle the light across the room. Can't handle the LED from a nightstand clock even. That would be a deal breaker for me. I need pitch black for sleeping.
    Do you have holes in your eyelids or do you sleep with your eyes open??
    01-10-2015 06:12 PM
  5. Darin Hamel's Avatar
    A light like that would prevent me from being able to sleep. I charge my Bluetooth earpiece in an enclosed wooden box, because I can't handle the light across the room. Can't handle the LED from a nightstand clock even. That would be a deal breaker for me. I need pitch black for sleeping.
    It's not a continual light. It is intermittent and turns on when you least expect it and it shocks you into full wakefulness with its blazing intensity!

    Its not that bad, but it was weird at first.
    01-10-2015 06:41 PM
  6. dorelse's Avatar
    stick your hand under a blanket, problem solved.
    01-10-2015 09:10 PM
  7. Chris_Kez's Avatar
    I found that light bothers me less frequently if I flip the band around and wear band facing out.
    01-10-2015 09:15 PM
  8. DroidUser42's Avatar
    Or, you could try wearing it tighter. A little light seepage can happen, but if it's a "blazing intensity", then I'd suggest the band is a little loose. I'm pretty sure the color is chosen to get a good signal, so I don't know as ANY wrist sensor is going to do any better.

    Wearing the band face-in at night can be a problem because when you rest your arm, the weight of your arm will push the HR sensor away from your arm and expose the light. While it can still happen when you wear it face-out, your arm is less likely to be in a position where the light will be visible to you.
    novaprime9 likes this.
    01-10-2015 11:31 PM
  9. originalstarlite's Avatar
    I wrote about this the first night I wore it. It is like a flashlight in bed and wearing it tighter is not for me. Sure under the covers is pretty good but Pennsylvania will not stay cold forever. So I came up with a terrific solution for me. After I "say goodnight" I slip over the band a black wrist sweatband. Not completely centered but just enough to cover.

    It holds the band in place, keeps the light in, and is a perfect reminder in the morning to end the sleep session.
    Darin Hamel and realwarder like this.
    01-11-2015 07:22 AM
  10. Nate Silver's Avatar
    I wrote about this the first night I wore it. It is like a flashlight in bed and wearing it tighter is not for me. Sure under the covers is pretty good but Pennsylvania will not stay cold forever. So I came up with a terrific solution for me. After I "say goodnight" I slip over the band a black wrist sweatband. Not completely centered but just enough to cover.

    It holds the band in place, keeps the light in, and is a perfect reminder in the morning to end the sleep session.
    Good solution! I wonder if a similar approach might help with light leakage contributing to hr inaccuracy during vigorous arm movement?
    01-11-2015 09:22 AM
  11. DroidUser42's Avatar
    I wonder if a similar approach might help with light leakage contributing to hr inaccuracy during vigorous arm movement?
    I've had significant problems when walking at night.

    HR is measured by analyzing blood flow. But I don't think the heart is the only thing that affects instantaneous blood flow. I think the problem is the Band has hard time telling the difference between a heart pulse and a pulse caused by arm movement. Note that one's own physiology can play a big part here. That could explain the wide range of experiences.

    I have gotten good results when I wear my Band in a strange way - so I think what part of your circulatory system ends up under the sensor can play a role as well.
    01-11-2015 03:49 PM
  12. novaprime9's Avatar
    I had to exchange a large for a medium because the sensor wasn't snug enough against my arm. If you tap the homescreen and swipe left to the heartrate monitor, it'll tell you "acquiring" and then if able, "locked."

    The large would rarely "lock" for me, and in many cases it would say "Please adjust fit" or even "Where did you go?"

    The medium has no such trouble, and there is absolutely no light leak unless I have it set to the widest-open point.

    Take a look and see if your band is able to lock in on your heart rate. If not, it's definitely too loose... and if you are seeing that much light, I suspect it is.
    originalstarlite likes this.
    01-12-2015 10:15 AM

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