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11-16-2016 10:52 AM
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  1. jlzimmerman's Avatar
    Fahrenheit scale is just ridiculous when you think of it. It has no basis in reality. That's why Celsius is the more popular temperature.
    Celius is more simplistic but that doesn't make Fahrenheit ridiculous. It is a more precise measurement of temperature, and when measuring matters such as global warming, when such little change has a huge impact, using Fahrenheit makes more sense. It has its place.

    With that said, I will agree that Imperial measurement is a complete arbitrary mess. It makes zero sense. Metric system all the way.
    01-26-2015 09:42 AM
  2. Harrie-S's Avatar
    Celius is more simplistic but that doesn't make Fahrenheit ridiculous. It is a more precise measurement of temperature, and when measuring matters such as global warming, when such little change has a huge impact, using Fahrenheit makes more sense. It has its place.

    .
    Sorry but why is Fahrenheit more accurate than Celsius..
    Is it measured with a different method.
    I do not think so (actual I know it's not).
    And using a digit does not make Celsius less accurate.
    N_LaRUE likes this.
    01-26-2015 09:53 AM
  3. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Celius is more simplistic but that doesn't make Fahrenheit ridiculous. It is a more precise measurement of temperature, and when measuring matters such as global warming, when such little change has a huge impact, using Fahrenheit makes more sense. It has its place.

    With that said, I will agree that Imperial measurement is a complete arbitrary mess. It makes zero sense. Metric system all the way.
    I know we're veering off topic a touch but can you explain to me why someone would use F over C and not just go straight to Kelvin?

    I see no use for F other than for reasons of sticking to an old scale because it's what people are used to. The F scale was adjusted by others to become a 'standard' but that doesn't mean it's any better than C or Kelvin. I don't see how it's more precise than either of those two.
    01-26-2015 09:55 AM
  4. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Sorry but why is Fahrenheit more accurate than Celsius..
    Is it measured with a different method.
    I do not think so (actual I know it's not).
    And using a digit does not make Celsius less accurate.
    Ah you beat me to it. :P
    Harrie-S likes this.
    01-26-2015 09:56 AM
  5. link68759's Avatar
    Fahrenheit is pretty good for weather and human body temperature, which is why I doubt Celsius will ever catch on in the American public. It does make more sense in that 0 is **cking cold, and 100 is **cking hot! Whereas the Celsius scale is rather arbitrary for measuring weather.
    The rest of the imperial system is entirely useless, though I have heard arguments that the numbers involved in imperial distance measurements (12 inches, 3 feet, etc) are multiples of things(?) and it becomes easier to do mental mathematical calculations. I wouldn't know, but I find it easy to believe that practices using an ancient system have evolved some built in conveniences.
    01-26-2015 10:15 AM
  6. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Fahrenheit is pretty good for weather and human body temperature, which is why I doubt Celsius will ever catch on in the American public. It does make more sense in that 0 is **cking cold, and 100 is **cking hot! Whereas the Celsius scale is rather arbitrary for measuring weather.
    The rest of the imperial system is entirely useless, though I have heard arguments that the numbers involved in imperial distance measurements (12 inches, 3 feet, etc) are multiples of things(?) and it becomes easier to do mental mathematical calculations. I wouldn't know, but I find it easy to believe that practices using an ancient system have evolved some built in conveniences.
    I'm still confused as to why F is better. It's really a matter of what you're used to. I'm used to C. You tell me things in F I haven't a clue what it means. So if F is better than why isn't everyone using F for those things?

    The metric system is base 10. It doesn't get much easier than that. The imperial system is base 12, which is messy.

    I've read where F came from and I get it but it doesn't feel natural to me.
    01-26-2015 10:34 AM
  7. link68759's Avatar
    .



    :) <- you
    01-26-2015 10:40 AM
  8. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    .
    :) <- you
    OK?

    Also, how is C arbitrary?
    01-26-2015 10:49 AM
  9. Xavier2508's Avatar
    The metric system is base 10. It doesn't get much easier than that. The imperial system is base 12, which is messy.
    Worse, it's base 12 (foot-inch) and 16(pound-ounce), with some oddities thrown in for good measure: 1 mile, aka 5280 foot or 1760 yards versus 1 kilometer, aka 1000 meters, 100 000 centimeters, or 1000 000 millimeters, which one is easier to use?
    SammyD97 likes this.
    01-26-2015 11:01 AM
  10. techiez's Avatar
    Fahrenheit is pretty good for weather and human body temperature, which is why I doubt Celsius will ever catch on in the American public. It does make more sense in that 0 is **cking cold, and 100 is **cking hot! Whereas the Celsius scale is rather arbitrary for measuring weather.
    The rest of the imperial system is entirely useless, though I have heard arguments that the numbers involved in imperial distance measurements (12 inches, 3 feet, etc) are multiples of things(?) and it becomes easier to do mental mathematical calculations. I wouldn't know, but I find it easy to believe that practices using an ancient system have evolved some built in conveniences.
    you are just used to Fahrenheit thats it, Celsius is in no way arbitrary.
    01-26-2015 11:05 AM
  11. link68759's Avatar
    I revoke my statement because I do not have the time or energy to hold everyones' hands through this discussion.
    01-26-2015 11:08 AM
  12. Harrie-S's Avatar
    I revoke my statement because I do not have the time or energy to hold everyones' hands through this discussion.
    Very wise decision.
    01-26-2015 11:12 AM
  13. link68759's Avatar
    I'll take one more shot at an elaboration. If you still don't get it, I'm out.

    I'm still confused as to why F is better. It's really a matter of what you're used to. I'm used to C. You tell me things in F I haven't a clue what it means. So if F is better than why isn't everyone using F for those things?

    The metric system is base 10. It doesn't get much easier than that. The imperial system is base 12, which is messy.

    I've read where F came from and I get it but it doesn't feel natural to me.

    Base 10 means very little out of the scientific realm. What matters, in the context that I brought up, is multiples of whole numbers, which are easier to work with. If you're trying to approximate measurements, say for building a house, having whole numbers makes processes significantly easier to remember and visualize, and etc. 12 has multiples of 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12. 10 has multiples 1, 5, and 10. With the imperial system, that's entirely double the chance that your measurements are going to result in a whole, easy to remember, easy to perform mental math on, number. I'm not a mathematician so I cannot explain in simpler or more exact terms how this plays out.

    As for temperature, yes, it works because I'm used to it. You're also used to Fahrenheit, though you don't realize it. It's not arbitrary- we deal with numbers similar to Fahrenheit *every* *single* *day* of our lives. Humans like things in scales of 0-100. Humans like things in scales of 0-100 so much they devised an entire imaginary number system that is based around the idea of 0-100, devised a way through which you can convert any number to this system, and gave it a name. We call it: per cent. That's per-100, percent, %. Fahrenheit basically measures the weather by way of 0-100, where those bounds are only exceeded in certain climates at certain times of the year (or during certain extreme weather events). Yes, this means Fahrenheit works better in some climates than in others, but it's a guided system, whereas Celsius is *entirely* arbitrary for weather. The upper bound is 37.777 degrees- it makes sense if you're used to it, yes, but Fahrenheit more closely resembles a much more familiar set of numbers, whereas Celsius is entirely its own thing.

    Know that I'm playing devil's advocate here- I do believe these are actual benefits of a few of the imperial system's quirks. I personally use the metric system, but I have the ability to see past my own biases...
    01-26-2015 11:48 AM
  14. Dratwister's Avatar
    Well... Since there are many more things concern to weather and environment rather than just human.
    So I'm good with 0 C degrees freeze pure water and 100 C degrees boil it (sea level), then human's normal temperature can be roughly 37-38 C degrees. lower or higher than that isn't normal.

    Most of metric system base on pure water states I think.
    1000 g or 1 kg of pure water can be contained within 1 box, and that box will be 1 litre in volume. Take a side of the box and we have 1 dm in length, which is 10 cm or 100 mm.
    Divide any of those values by 10 and we have higher level, vice versa with multiply for smaller level.

    Well, I grew up with these system so it's much more easier for me to just remember the "10" step.
    BTW, this is so OOT :))
    Last edited by Dratwister; 01-27-2015 at 01:19 PM.
    SammyD97 likes this.
    01-26-2015 12:24 PM
  15. gMaesterUK's Avatar
    Technically that website is incorrect, the UK uses both metric and imperial. I use both, I can only do temperature in metric (C) but I have to do length in imperial (inches, feet, yards, miles) same with weight (technically mass - as weight is a constant on earth) [pounds, stones]. If you watch the news, they usually state length in miles (unless it's short distances, then it's metres [confused much??] and the weather in Celsius.

    Sadly the EU tried to force us to adopt the full metric system and the people rejected it so that's why we have both :(

    G.
    01-26-2015 12:25 PM
  16. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    I'll take one more shot at an elaboration. If you still don't get it, I'm out.




    Base 10 means very little out of the scientific realm. What matters, in the context that I brought up, is multiples of whole numbers, which are easier to work with. If you're trying to approximate measurements, say for building a house, having whole numbers makes processes significantly easier to remember and visualize, and etc. 12 has multiples of 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12. 10 has multiples 1, 5, and 10. With the imperial system, that's entirely double the chance that your measurements are going to result in a whole, easy to remember, easy to perform mental math on, number. I'm not a mathematician so I cannot explain in simpler or more exact terms how this plays out.

    As for temperature, yes, it works because I'm used to it. You're also used to Fahrenheit, though you don't realize it. It's not arbitrary- we deal with numbers similar to Fahrenheit *every* *single* *day* of our lives. Humans like things in scales of 0-100. Humans like things in scales of 0-100 so much they devised an entire imaginary number system that is based around the idea of 0-100, devised a way through which you can convert any number to this system, and gave it a name. We call it: per cent. That's per-100, percent, %. Fahrenheit basically measures the weather by way of 0-100, where those bounds are only exceeded in certain climates at certain times of the year (or during certain extreme weather events). Yes, this means Fahrenheit works better in some climates than in others, but it's a guided system, whereas Celsius is *entirely* arbitrary for weather. The upper bound is 37.777 degrees- it makes sense if you're used to it, yes, but Fahrenheit more closely resembles a much more familiar set of numbers, whereas Celsius is entirely its own thing.

    Know that I'm playing devil's advocate here- I do believe these are actual benefits of a few of the imperial system's quirks. I personally use the metric system, but I have the ability to see past my own biases...
    Just to point out something... You basically explained why the metric system is more comfortable (ignoring Celsius for the moment). Base 10 system. It makes more sense to people and is easier to work with. Also the metric due to it's nature has a simple small to large structure. Base 12 is more complex. No one likes using fractions.

    As someone above has pointed out Celsius is based on water. From a weather perspective this makes sense. Zero means your likely to have ice. Blow zero you're going to have ice and possible snow. So to me, weather wise, Celsius make a heck of a lot more sense. No one uses decimal places when discussing weather unless your a scientist. We only use whole numbers and possibly 0.5.

    I get where your coming from but the scale devised for F was way more arbitrary than C. Zero is when water freezes. That has tangible understanding for most people.

    The is no need to hold my hand either. I'm quite capable of understanding concepts. Thanks.

    As for playing devils advocate, you didn't explain you position very well at first. If you want to get a person to understand a system they are not use to and supposedly better, you need to explain why. I still don't agree with you but I'll leave it there. To each their own.
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 01-27-2015 at 02:09 AM.
    01-26-2015 12:52 PM
  17. jlzimmerman's Avatar
    Sorry but why is Fahrenheit more accurate than Celsius..
    Is it measured with a different method.
    I do not think so (actual I know it's not).
    And using a digit does not make Celsius less accurate.
    I didn't say Celsius is less accurate. They are both accurate. I said Fahrenheit is more precise, which it is.
    93 F = 34 C
    94 F = 34 C

    Similarly compared to Celsius, Fahrenheit is also more precise than Kelvin. A 10 change in Kelvin is roughly equal to 18 of change in Fahrenheit. Given how sensitive humans and other species are to slight temperature changes, and its use in minute sciences, Fahrenheit make more sense because it is more precise.
    01-26-2015 02:47 PM
  18. Harrie-S's Avatar
    QUOTE=jlzimmerman;2958471]
    I didn't say Celsius is less accurate. They are both accurate. I said Fahrenheit is more precise, which it is.
    93 F = 34 C
    94 F = 34 C
    QUOTE]

    Sorry again
    93 F = 33.9 C
    94 F = 34.4 C
    And every thermometer gives temp in Celsius with 1 digit after the . or ,
    01-26-2015 03:05 PM
  19. SammyD97's Avatar
    I didn't say Celsius is less accurate. They are both accurate. I said Fahrenheit is more precise, which it is.
    93 F = 34 C
    94 F = 34 C

    Similarly compared to Celsius, Fahrenheit is also more precise than Kelvin. A 10 change in Kelvin is roughly equal to 18 of change in Fahrenheit. Given how sensitive humans and other species are to slight temperature changes, and its use in minute sciences, Fahrenheit make more sense because it is more precise.
    Decimals exist you know
    01-26-2015 05:15 PM
  20. Ambious's Avatar
    Basically:

    xqeoshk.jpg

    But yeah, let's not open that can of worms.
    link68759 and Joe920 like this.
    02-06-2015 09:51 AM
  21. Alain_A's Avatar
    Basically:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	XqEoSHK.jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	15.2 KB 
ID:	95987

    But yeah, let's not open that can of worms.
    0 Celsius = 32 degree F which is the freeze temperature.
    02-08-2015 06:49 PM
  22. Alain_A's Avatar
    Also I am in Canada set Cortana for US. She gives me the temperature in celsius without me asking.
    Avi Anand likes this.
    02-08-2015 06:51 PM
  23. Alain_A's Avatar
    Cortana seems to be hook with mns weather..in msn weather one can change F to C in the setting..when ask her she respond in that language but when set up in places book she will display it in F...
    02-21-2015 12:24 PM
  24. Jeremy Reist's Avatar
    Hi,
    I found a way to change Cortana to Celsius.
    First bring up Cortana, go to Home.
    Then when it shows you the current weather press the three dots.
    example1.png
    Go to edit in Notebook, then at the bottom of that options page you can set a Unit.
    example2.png
    Tested and works with Cortana.
    07-30-2015 08:16 AM
  25. Fixtor eServices's Avatar
    To change the weather setting unit from Fahrenheit to Celsius follow the steps below

    1. Click on Cortana now on the left hand you will see 3 dash line icon click on it.
    2. Click on Notebook scroll down and click on "weather" select the city you are tracking and then click on Fahrenheit under Units select Celsius and hit save, you are all set now.
    Vice versa if you want to change it back to Fahrenheit
    08-30-2015 02:59 AM
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