06-13-2018 01:23 PM
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  1. blazewon22's Avatar
    For me, it comes down to price. Put simply, iPhones are too expensive.
    The iPhone 8 in the US is $50 more than the Pixel 2. Not a big difference to stay in the ecosystem. Also as you mentioned the updates, lifecycle, and resale values are all better.
    mc_razza likes this.
    10-20-2017 09:29 PM
  2. Xaxxus's Avatar
    For me, it comes down to price. Put simply, iPhones are too expensive. I'm already invested in the Apple ecosystem with an iMac (albeit from 2008), two iPads and an Apple TV but I cannot justify dropping over a grand for an iPhone 8. And forget buying yesterday's tech like the iPhone SE for over AUD $500. That's pretty much my argument for deciding to go with Android. However, one thing I am worried about is the comparatively weak security of Android over iOS, W10M and even WP8.1. Sure, Google pushes out monthly security updates, but that's dependent on the hardware manufacturer. Also Google guarantees a mere two years of updates from whereas Apple's commitment lasts far longer.
    iphones have way better resale value than android phones do. I've sold year old iphones in decent condition for 80% of the price I paid for them.

    Meanwhile stores won't even give me a trade in value for my oneplus
    mc_razza and aximtreo like this.
    10-20-2017 09:37 PM
  3. PerfectReign's Avatar
    The one thing cool about Android is that it can be completely customized by rooting a device and installing a custom ROM. I did that several years ago on my S2 as well as on my Note 2 and first Kindle Fire.

    The thing about Iphone is that it is written in a lower level language and works faster than Java with the JRE android environment. Not a huge difference but I see it.

    Take your pick. I chose the Iphone 7+ because it sucks slightly less than the others.

    Sent from mTalk on my 950xl
    10-20-2017 10:58 PM
  4. Xaxxus's Avatar
    The one thing cool about Android is that it can be completely customized by rooting a device and installing a custom ROM. I did that several years ago on my S2 as well as on my Note 2 and first Kindle Fire.

    The thing about Iphone is that it is written in a lower level language and works faster than Java with the JRE android environment. Not a huge difference but I see it.

    Take your pick. I chose the Iphone 7+ because it sucks slightly less than the others.

    Sent from mTalk on my 950xl
    In addition to performing better, Apple just has the advantage of making both the software and the hardware. If they want some new instructions to be added to their chipset, they just call up their hardware department and have them program it.

    Even with Android, if an oem makes the hardware, they don't have this level of control. Because they get their chips from. Qualcomm.

    Samsung is the only exception to this with their exnyos chips.
    TgeekB likes this.
    10-20-2017 11:03 PM
  5. TgeekB's Avatar
    I spent a lot of time with Android and enjoyed it for all the previously mentioned reasons. Eventually, I decided I wanted the stability of Apple and haven’t looked back.
    It’s not a race or war to me, it’s just picking the one that you are most comfortable with.
    10-21-2017 07:43 AM
  6. Chris Jennings3's Avatar
    Windows phone users who chose the platform after research are mostly a bunch of people that like something a little different. often slightly on the geek side and like me like living on the knife edge of tech. I and many others found comfort with Oneplus. Oneplus are a little different. they produce bleeding edge tech and to be honest. android these days is a very good os. when you first move to android you can customise the experience to resemble something you are familiar with and ease the transition.
    12-08-2017 10:03 AM
  7. Old_Mil's Avatar
    I have been an observer of the platform wars since the very beginning. My first computer was an Apple ][+ and saw the launch of the IBM PC. In those early days it was Apple that had the open platform with an almost endless number of accessories that you could plug in and tinkering you could do under the hood.

    In the intervening decades, first under the leadership of Steve Jobs and later Tim Cook apply steadily worked to insulate the end user from the mechanics of the machine he was using and limit his choices. This was first evident in the release of the Macintosh but that philosophy of limiting user choice has continued with iOS.

    I don't think most windows phone users will be happy with the design philosophy in most Apple products. The key in switching to Android is to get the right device as there are a lot of substandard android releases out there.

    ....or just keep using you Windows phone and switch when it dies.
    12-16-2017 06:59 AM
  8. Siddharth Ramakrishnan's Avatar
    I do own all of the flagship lumia devices and I got switched to iOS.

    Because I always like premium devices and iPhone feel more premium in build quality, usage and support.

    I got iPhone 8 Plus on the day one and I am more satisfied with its performance and battery level. I was so happy that I was just charging once a day.

    I do speak 3 to 4 hours a day and total usage of 8 hours and more of on screen usage with 10+ emails syncing all time, LTE and location always on, all the apps running in background.

    I skip Android because I feel
    Insecure about my data when I use android.
    TgeekB and caesar500 like this.
    01-10-2018 05:05 AM
  9. LuxuryTouringZone's Avatar
    "Why most of WP users switch to android and not iOS?"

    It's because they wanted MicroSD card slots and headphone jacks.
    02-10-2018 04:09 PM
  10. TgeekB's Avatar
    "Why most of WP users switch to android and not iOS?"

    It's because they wanted MicroSD card slots and headphone jacks.
    That could be for some. Or customization.
    I went with iOS for stability and customer support.
    Elky64, libra89 and caesar500 like this.
    02-10-2018 04:28 PM
  11. AnonymousRider's Avatar
    I use iOS because I found it faster than Android & I am a google hater.
    02-10-2018 04:34 PM
  12. TgeekB's Avatar
    I use iOS because I found it faster than Android & I am a google hater.
    I actually used Google for a while. I liked it but then grew weary of the fragmentation and constant customization it sucks you into.
    I just want my device to work well and be supported, thus iOS.
    Elky64 likes this.
    02-10-2018 04:37 PM
  13. Elky64's Avatar
    I actually used Google for a while. I liked it but then grew weary of the fragmentation and constant customization it sucks you into.
    I just want my device to work well and be supported, thus iOS.
    Android has worked out very well for me void of the slowdowns and lagging so many proclaim. Dove back on the Droid bandwagon close to three years ago and rarely will you hear me complain about it. Enjoy the ability to customize yet once we find our zone it's basically a "set it-n-forget it" affair after that.

    My wife on the other hand is all in on the iOS front and it too has proven to be stellar. After 2 iPhone's and four iPad (one is mine) and never a reset, she/we have really nothing to complain about here. OK maybe Apples constraints at times LOL.

    So to answer the question - Windows Phone provides far more control and offers "extras" that iOS lacks/lacked, Android fills that gap (can be device dependent) albeit in the extreme sense.
    Guytronic and Laura Knotek like this.
    02-10-2018 06:01 PM
  14. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Android has worked out very well for me void of the slowdowns and lagging so many proclaim. Dove back on the Droid bandwagon close to three years ago and rarely will you hear me complain about it. Enjoy the ability to customize yet once we find our zone it's basically a "set it-n-forget it" affair after that.

    My wife on the other hand is all in on the iOS front and it too has proven to be stellar. After 2 iPhone's and four iPad (one is mine) and never a reset, she/we have really nothing to complain about here. OK maybe Apples constraints at times LOL.

    So to answer the question - Windows Phone provides far more control and offers "extras" that iOS lacks/lacked, Android fills that gap (can be device dependent) albeit in the extreme sense.
    I'm the same. When I first used Android I did indeed explore the various customisation options. However, I've long since found what I like, and I haven't done any customisations in a long time.
    Elky64, fatclue_98 and aximtreo like this.
    02-10-2018 07:56 PM
  15. fatclue_98's Avatar
    I’m surprised most mainstream Windows users don’t go the iOS route. Android, for all its capabilities, usually requires more steps to do the same task as a Windows phone or iPhone. Quick example, on your dialer you have all your most recent calls. On Windows and iOS you tap on that log entry and it dials that number. On Android you tap the entry and then you have to choose whether to call, send a text message or email. That’s a repetitive function of the contacts app. If I wanted those choices I wouldn’t go to my dialer. A phone app is to make voice calls, that’s it.

    It’s little things like this that gives Apple their “it just works” reputation and deservedly so.
    02-10-2018 08:11 PM
  16. TgeekB's Avatar
    I’m surprised most mainstream Windows users don’t go the iOS route. Android, for all its capabilities, usually requires more steps to do the same task as a Windows phone or iPhone. Quick example, on your dialer you have all your most recent calls. On Windows and iOS you tap on that log entry and it dials that number. On Android you tap the entry and then you have to choose whether to call, send a text message or email. That’s a repetitive function of the contacts app. If I wanted those choices I wouldn’t go to my dialer. A phone app is to make voice calls, that’s it.

    It’s little things like this that gives Apple their “it just works” reputation and deservedly so.
    Well said and I think that’s exactly why I moved iOS.
    02-11-2018 07:49 AM
  17. Lightning_Racer's Avatar
    Also Apple products retain value. You can basically sell your iPhone for 75-80% of it's purchase price and buy the next model very easily.

    Android on the other hand, your lucky to find a buyer if it's not a Samsung/google device.
    I'm still on Windows mobile, and haven't yet ever used iOS or Android in my life (going from work-issued flip phones to personal L630 to L650). Your point here would an argument for Android for me. I've only had two smartphones, and I don't intend to sell them - they get used up. I'm leaning towards getting a used international version Galaxy S7 with the Exynos processor. That way I can turn it into a Galaxy S9 with a ROM and basically have a phone that works just like a current flagship, but for only $230.
    xandros9 likes this.
    06-10-2018 08:52 PM
  18. xandros9's Avatar
    I'm still on Windows mobile, and haven't yet ever used iOS or Android in my life (going from work-issued flip phones to personal L630 to L650). Your point here would an argument for Android for me. I've only had two smartphones, and I don't intend to sell them - they get used up. I'm leaning towards getting a used international version Galaxy S7 with the Exynos processor. That way I can turn it into a Galaxy S9 with a ROM and basically have a phone that works just like a current flagship, but for only $230.
    The thing is, not only do iPhones retain value well, they have a longer service life by default.

    Right now the iPhone 5s (released mid-2013) is slated to be supported at least through 2019 with iOS 12. (and Apple is focusing on older model performance this time too) Samsung flagships get two-three years of sporadic updates tops. (with random, rare exceptions)

    The Galaxy S4 just can't compare to that. For $170-ish I got an iPhone 6s (2015) for my sister and we can expect it to see updates through 2020 or 2021 depending, maybe more. (and Apple hasn't pulled the rug out unexpectedly like many Android OEMs) Performance is still great a couple, almost three years in too.

    Sure, you can throw on a custom ROM but you have to make sure you have a non-carrier model, have to verify what chip (Exynos, Snapdragon...) and read a bunch before going about the procedure. And on top of that, once a custom ROM enters the scene, many apps will complain/not function since the bootloader has been unlocked/phone has been rooted (see: SafetyNet) which as a whole adds another layer of headache.

    Also iPhones have parts available and most shops can deal with them. Samsung phones, less so especially with the glue-heavy construction of recent Galaxy S's.
    Xaxxus, libra89 and Laura Knotek like this.
    06-12-2018 10:15 AM
  19. Xaxxus's Avatar
    The thing is, not only do iPhones retain value well, they have a longer service life by default.

    Right now the iPhone 5s (released mid-2013) is slated to be supported at least through 2019 with iOS 12. (and Apple is focusing on older model performance this time too) Samsung flagships get two-three years of sporadic updates tops. (with random, rare exceptions)

    The Galaxy S4 just can't compare to that. For $170-ish I got an iPhone 6s (2015) for my sister and we can expect it to see updates through 2020 or 2021 depending, maybe more. (and Apple hasn't pulled the rug out unexpectedly like many Android OEMs) Performance is still great a couple, almost three years in too.

    Sure, you can throw on a custom ROM but you have to make sure you have a non-carrier model, have to verify what chip (Exynos, Snapdragon...) and read a bunch before going about the procedure. And on top of that, once a custom ROM enters the scene, many apps will complain/not function since the bootloader has been unlocked/phone has been rooted (see: SafetyNet) which as a whole adds another layer of headache.

    Also iPhones have parts available and most shops can deal with them. Samsung phones, less so especially with the glue-heavy construction of recent Galaxy S's.
    Most people just can’t see this.

    I have so many friends who were die hard android fans/anti Apple(myself included) who converted full Apple after trying Apple products.

    I was a huge Mac hater and got a MacBook at work to use for development. I can’t ever go back to a windows laptop. I’ll still be using my windows desktop for gaming, but I am strongly debating buying a MacBook pro for myself with an egpu and windows on bootcamp to play games and just toss my desktop all together.

    To top it off macs retain their value almost as well as iPhones do.
    06-12-2018 10:45 AM
  20. xandros9's Avatar
    Most people just can’t see this.

    I have so many friends who were die hard android fans/anti Apple(myself included) who converted full Apple after trying Apple products.

    I was a huge Mac hater and got a MacBook at work to use for development. I can’t ever go back to a windows laptop. I’ll still be using my windows desktop for gaming, but I am strongly debating buying a MacBook pro for myself with an egpu and windows on bootcamp to play games and just toss my desktop all together.

    To top it off macs retain their value almost as well as iPhones do.
    Ironically, I just switched from a MacBook to an older ThinkPad I had lying around for the time being for similar reasons. (the big one though was a desktop appearing, rendering it overkill considering the money spent)

    Windows supports a wider-gamut of PCs for a longer period of time where their Macs are subject to similar rolling support windows like their phones, albeit on a much longer time-scale. Mojave drops pre-2012 MBP's and earlier (and Sierra dropped pre-late-2009 models) while currently I'm banging away on a mid-2008 ThinkPad that will see the latest version of Windows 10 for the foreseeable future.

    There are some minor quirks though, but it works very well overall. Parts and repairs are easier too, also somewhat ironic considering the difficulty in repairing modern Mac portables compared to the iPhone.

    I do miss that trackpad and macOS elegance though. Maybe I'll get a newer, lower-specced model.
    libra89 and Laura Knotek like this.
    06-12-2018 11:25 AM
  21. fatclue_98's Avatar
    Ironically, I just switched from a MacBook to an older ThinkPad I had lying around for the time being for similar reasons. (the big one though was a desktop appearing, rendering it overkill considering the money spent)

    Windows supports a wider-gamut of PCs for a longer period of time where their Macs are subject to similar rolling support windows like their phones, albeit on a much longer time-scale. Mojave drops pre-2012 MBP's and earlier (and Sierra dropped pre-late-2009 models) while currently I'm banging away on a mid-2008 ThinkPad that will see the latest version of Windows 10 for the foreseeable future.

    There are some minor quirks though, but it works very well overall. Parts and repairs are easier too, also somewhat ironic considering the difficulty in repairing modern Mac portables compared to the iPhone.

    I do miss that trackpad and macOS elegance though. Maybe I'll get a newer, lower-specced model.
    I sold my 2017 Macbook and kept an older 2010 model I had in mothballs. Simple reason, I still get High Sierra and I was able to put twin 8GB sticks of RAM in less than 5 minutes. With 16GB at my disposal now, this thing flat flies.

    Sent from my Alcatel Idol 4S on mTalk
    xandros9, aximtreo, TgeekB and 2 others like this.
    06-12-2018 11:47 AM
  22. tgp's Avatar
    Why are most people Android users? Whatever the answer is, it's probably the same.

    I've used both iOS and Android. I still use both. Until something comes along to cause me to do otherwise, I will continue to use both.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    06-12-2018 12:52 PM
  23. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    I'm curious if a reason is that whatever may have been intuitive in WP, has a similar thought process in Android.
    06-12-2018 12:56 PM
  24. Xaxxus's Avatar
    Why are most people Android users? Whatever the answer is, it's probably the same.

    I've used both iOS and Android. I still use both. Until something comes along to cause me to do otherwise, I will continue to use both.
    The overwhelming majority of android sales are the sub $200 phones to the billions of people in developing countries.

    If you only compare flagship phones you will see very different numbers.
    06-12-2018 01:00 PM
  25. tgp's Avatar
    The overwhelming majority of android sales are the sub $200 phones to the billions of people in developing countries.

    If you only compare flagship phones you will see very different numbers.
    There overwhelming majority of Windows Phone sales were low end devices as well.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    06-12-2018 01:38 PM
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