08-28-2014 02:58 PM
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  1. SergyOrtiz's Avatar
    I don't know why I couldn't find anything about this in the forums but guys at Slash Gear have managed to get both, Android and Windows Phone versions of the HTC M8, and they're doing a very interesting comparison regarding their battery life.

    So far Windows Phone performance is terrific, I believe this kind of news should get more exposed.

    Source (in case you missed the link above): HTC One M8 Windows vs Android Battery Wars - SlashGear
    08-25-2014 02:42 PM
  2. cbreze's Avatar
    Interesting. Not at all surprised tho as my WP M8 seems to have excellent battery life over any android I've owned. Thanks for posting.
    08-25-2014 04:40 PM
  3. Johntee540's Avatar
    I just picked up the phone last Friday. I loaded up a bunch of new music I wanted to get caught up as well as several TedTalk; Wait Wait Don't Tell me; Radio Lab; and Prairie Home Companion Podcasts. Monday I drove to TN and back from Washington DC. Listened via Bluetooth connection with my car to all my music and most of the podcasts. About 900 miles and 14 hours and the battery still had 49% on it even after several phone calls during the trip. I hope the battery continues with this kind of performance. - JT
    08-27-2014 10:24 AM
  4. salmanahmad's Avatar
    I don't know why I couldn't find anything about this in the forums but guys at Slash Gear have managed to get both, Android and Windows Phone versions of the HTC M8, and they're doing a very interesting comparison regarding their battery life.

    So far Windows Phone performance is terrific, I believe this kind of news should get more exposed.

    Source (in case you missed the link above): HTC One M8 Windows vs Android Battery Wars - SlashGear
    Though it's nice that the Windows Phone variant handles the battery better, it's probably because Windows Phone suspends most background tasks and applications.

    Plus maybe just maybe, the extra gestures on the Android variant could also be taking up more battery(could be)

    But I'll stay tuned to this test.
    08-27-2014 01:37 PM
  5. chezm's Avatar
    Though it's nice that the Windows Phone variant handles the battery better, it's probably because Windows Phone suspends most background tasks and applications.

    Plus maybe just maybe, the extra gestures on the Android variant could also be taking up more battery(could be)

    But I'll stay tuned to this test.
    Agreed, I believe a fair test would require multiple scenarios involving using applications or browsing the internet, streaming video. I find WP8.1 does a good job while in idle state conserving battery, but once in use the battery drains pretty quickly. Nonetheless its nice to know the phone can go idle for a long period of time.
    08-27-2014 02:32 PM
  6. salmanahmad's Avatar
    Agreed, I believe a fair test would require multiple scenarios involving using applications or browsing the internet, streaming video. I find WP8.1 does a good job while in idle state conserving battery, but once in use the battery drains pretty quickly. Nonetheless its nice to know the phone can go idle for a long period of time.
    Plus the fact that widgets on Android do take up more battery than live tiles, primarily because live tiles refresh every 30 minutes(unless a notification comes through).

    Plus apps on Windows Phone can technically run under the lockscreen, however can't fully function in the background.

    Plus HTC One M8 will be getting a boost in battery by about 30 to 40% when Android L arrives.
    08-27-2014 02:43 PM
  7. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    Funny test...

    The problem with it is the Android phone isn't set up to do the same thing as the WP.

    Turn off the background task,run the battery savers that each have and then compare them. Then try each with the extreme battery mode...

    I've used my phone a lot today,including using turn bye turn maps calls text utube browsing..still at 60% with it off the charger for 16 hours..so it's all in how it's set up to run..

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    08-27-2014 03:38 PM
  8. cbreze's Avatar
    Bottom line is it lasts longer than any android I've ever used. The reason why doesn't concern me much. My M8 has excellent battery life and I chuckle when I read people complaining about no wireless charging. I used that alot with my icon. With my M8 I don't need to charge but once a night. This is truly one sweet device. I have to work at it to get the battery down.
    08-27-2014 04:28 PM
  9. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    I took this screen capture after I posted prior not bad for a Android phone ehh..

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    Attached Thumbnails 13820.jpg  
    08-27-2014 09:19 PM
  10. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    I think this one shows the history

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    Attached Thumbnails 13821.jpg  
    08-27-2014 09:21 PM
  11. D M C's Avatar
    I am waiting to see GSMArena Battery test.
    I wonder how does WP performs in browsing, videos test compare to Android.
    08-27-2014 09:25 PM
  12. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    I am waiting to see GSMArena Battery test.
    I wonder how does WP performs in browsing, videos test compare to Android.
    I would think that they will be very close if both are set up the same.

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    08-27-2014 09:51 PM
  13. Mr. MacPhisto's Avatar
    My brother and I use our phones in similar ways, so the one real life comparison I can make is after 9 hours for each. His was at 67% and mine at 83%. Both are good numbers, but I know how impressive the M8 is after using the 928. That phone would be done to 40% or less after 9 hours.
    08-28-2014 07:33 AM
  14. a5cent's Avatar
    I would think that they will be very close if both are set up the same.
    One must realize however, that there is only one configuration where the setup is 'the same', which is when we have no apps installed on either and all background tasks deactivated on both. In such a configuration both devices will exhibit similar battery life. It's just that such a test is completely useless, because that isn't how our devices are actually used. We own smartphones to run apps...

    As soon as you install apps, even if they are the same ones, that is when differences in battery life become apparent. The delta will vary, depending on which apps are installed. Furthermore, depending on the apps used, the delta might be very small or gigantic.

    Android gives apps the ability to run whenever they want for as long as they want. If you use such apps, you must pay for that ability with battery power. Simple as that.
    08-28-2014 08:14 AM
  15. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    True but initial settings for both have to be able to operate the same way.

    Background task can be set to shut down in closing in each..same for the way synchronization is done.

    Each have battery optimization and each must be approached the same way otherwise any"testing" is skewed and giving false sense of superiority..

    In other words each must be setup the same way initially..Then each aspect can be tested individually .

    Just because a WP m8 does something automatically,doesn't mean that the Android version is worse off just because you have to tweak a setting that just makes it easier on setting up the phone.
    08-28-2014 08:25 AM
  16. a5cent's Avatar
    Background task can be set to shut down in closing in each..same for the way synchronization is done.
    I see what you are saying.

    The question is whether that approach accurately represents how people use their devices. I suspect that for most it does not.

    In a way, there is no perfect battery test, except the one you do yourself, with your own devices, setup the way you use them, because any change to apps used or battery settings really can make a big difference.

    I question the usefulness of tests like the one mentioned by the OP, simply because they don't mention any of this. They don't state how the devices were setup, nor do they provide any analysis of the results. Pretty amateurish if you ask me.
    08-28-2014 08:40 AM
  17. Mr. MacPhisto's Avatar
    I see what you are saying.

    The question is whether that approach accurately represents how people use their devices. I suspect that for most it does not.

    In a way, there is no perfect battery test, except the one you do yourself, with your own devices, setup the way you use them, because any change to apps used or battery settings really can make a big difference.

    I question the usefulness of tests like the one mentioned by the OP, simply because they don't mention any of this. They don't state how the devices were setup, nor do they provide any analysis of the results. Pretty amateurish if you ask me.
    The controlled tests are largely meaningless. I'd be interested in someone carrying a fresh One M8 for Android for a week with their normal usage and apps then following that with a One M8 for Windows the next with their normal usage and comparing the battery life.

    Offhand, I would say that the One for Windows will do better on battery for the average user because the average Android user does not manage their open apps very well and Windows Phone is set up to require little or no management. A power user will have a different experience because they are more likely to manage the apps.

    It'd be interesting just to see an average user use both and report battery findings.
    a5cent and Karthik Naik like this.
    08-28-2014 08:45 AM
  18. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    The controlled tests are largely meaningless. I'd be interested in someone carrying a fresh One M8 for Android for a week with their normal usage and apps then following that with a One M8 for Windows the next with their normal usage and comparing the battery life.

    Offhand, I would say that the One for Windows will do better on battery for the average user because the average Android user does not manage their open apps very well and Windows Phone is set up to require little or no management. A power user will have a different experience because they are more likely to manage the apps.

    It'd be interesting just to see an average user use both and report battery findings.
    I think you're underestimating the average Android user these days.

    Battery management has been on the forefront of discussions with everyone on Android because of how bad it's used to be. You just have to look in the app store for how many battery apps there are there.

    The manufacturers have gotten much better in past year for this,as well as the os being able to take advantage of the latest chipset out.

    While I agree with you that WP is easier to the uninformed,I also know that Android on my m8 can be very frugal too. That's the difference between platforms..one has to be in control,the other let's you decide for yourself....lol

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    08-28-2014 09:02 AM
  19. Mr. MacPhisto's Avatar
    I think you're underestimating the average Android user these days.

    Battery management has been on the forefront of discussions with everyone on Android because of how bad it's used to be. You just have to look in the app store for how many battery apps there are there.

    The manufacturers have gotten much better in past year for this,as well as the os being able to take advantage of the latest chipset out.

    While I agree with you that WP is easier to the uninformed,I also know that Android on my m8 can be very frugal too. That's the difference between platforms..one has to be in control,the other let's you decide for yourself....lol

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    I don't think Android is as frugal. My main comparison is my brother's Android M8 and I get better battery every day so far - and by pretty large margins. There are still underlying issues on Android that make it the biggest battery hog of the three mobile OSes. That's not to say it's bad, but it's management of apps make sit so. And this is largely because Google can't get apps to mostly hibernate when not on screen. They've reportedly attempted to get it to work that way and haven't been able to implement it.

    The M8 gets great battery life either way, but the Windows Phone version is staggering to me. Clearly better than real world usage against someone running the same phone with Android.

    I also would say that you overestimate most Android users. I hear nothing but complaints of how terrible Android's battery life is and what a pain it is to have to manage apps all day or find an app that can do it effectively. It's a shame MS is in their current position in mobile, because I have yet to talk to a single average user that actually likes Android, they just feel like they have no choice other than Apple. Microsoft needs to make sure they know they have a choice and the more who choose Windows Phone, the more there will be no app complaints outside of the Google stuff, but Google will be Yahoo in five years anyways. Their per ad revenue is in steep decline and if you thought they were intrusive before, wait until they are trying to prop up their quarterly reports by getting even more invasive.
    a5cent and Karthik Naik like this.
    08-28-2014 09:31 AM
  20. a5cent's Avatar
    While I agree with you that WP is easier to the uninformed,I also know that Android on my m8 can be very frugal too. That's the difference between platforms..one has to be in control,the other let's you decide for yourself....lol
    Except it's not just about uninformed vs informed. I don't want to have to micromanage my apps in that way. It's a chor that shouldn't require a human brain to involve itself with such menial tasks. I don't want every new app I install to be a potential battery killer if not configured correctly.

    I also think you are overestimating the average smartphone user (not just Android user) :-) At least in my experience, most couldn't be bothered to even look at battery settings. For most, if it doesn't work reliably out of the box, the product is poor or buggy.
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    08-28-2014 09:44 AM
  21. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    Wow..that's totally opposite from my m8 and those around me with Android phones.

    My m8 is exceedingly frugal when it comes to the battery life,and isn't difficult to make it so. One of the best things to do with it to extend battery life is to enable the built-in battery saver. For those who are still having issues with it,clearing the cache seems to eliminate this after a restart too. Now this is for the m8..not the rest the Android phones,however getting a full day of usage has never been a concern on any I have ever owned..but this phone is considerably better than them.

    Most people I associate with already know about app management,and each Android phone has different ways of dealing with it unlike WP closed architecture...and while it can be confusing for some,most folks who actually like Android phones learn what it takes to get the best out of their devices.

    As to your comments about Google...you really need to rethink your opinion. They are bound by the same laws as all the rest and if they go further overboard with how they do things,people will get around it as they always have... Android is open source..WP isn't....and Google's revenue is still growing..so things won't be changing anytime soon...just like the growth rate of Android phones...

    Each platform has good and bad my friend..
    Last edited by MDMcAtee; 08-28-2014 at 10:03 AM.
    08-28-2014 09:50 AM
  22. a5cent's Avatar
    Most people I associate with already know about app management,and each Android phone has different ways of dealing with it unlike WP closed architecture...and while it can be confusing for some,most folks who actually like Android phones learn what it takes to get the best out of their devices.
    Could it be that you work in the tech sector and that you have surrounded yourself with similar people? I exist in exactly that kind of bubble and I'm always shocked at how different society is when I get ripped out of that environment and thrust into a more representative group of people (during military service).

    Just the fact that your folks like Android already puts them out of the mainstream IMHO. Most just want a phone and most are more closely tied to an OEM (due to marketing), rather than the OS itself.
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    08-28-2014 10:02 AM
  23. Mr. MacPhisto's Avatar
    Wow..that's totally opposite from my m8 and those around me with Android phones.

    My m8 is exceedingly frugal when it comes to the battery life,and isn't difficult to make it so. One of the best things to do with it to extend battery life is to enable the built-in battery saver. For those who are still having issues with it,clearing the cache seems to eliminate this after a restart too. Now this is for the m8..not the rest the Android phones,however getting a full day of usage has never been a concern on any I have ever owned..but this phone is considerably better than them.

    Most people I associate with already know about app management,and each Android phone has different ways of dealing with it unlike WP closed architecture...and while it can be confusing for some,most folks who actually like Android phones learn what it takes to get the best out of their devices.
    I've never actually met anyone that likes Android phones. They tolerate it and think it's okay, but it's like Windows has often been looked at - I'm stuck with this and I'd prefer better.

    The M8 does better than most on Android, but I know people with S5s, S4s, Moto Droids, etc. Kudos to HTC for building a phone that handles Android and Windows Phone so well - because it is superb, but the One M8 is the best thing out there and it's not even close (other than two superior Nokia features - Camera and live audio recording).

    I get a lot of info from talking to a Verizon friend who is in corporate sales, but I also chat with AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, and Sprint reps as part of my job on a regular basis. Their impressions are that people find Android a pain. Battery life is worse than expected, performance is too. They just feel like their choice is Apple or Android - and people that don't go for the iPhone quickly have an aversion to Apple. Tech geeks love Android because they can root the phone, play around, etc, but it's not for the masses and it's poorly designed as a mobile OS. It's extremely inefficient AS IS unless the OEM dickers with it in some way.

    The sad thing from the Windows Phone angle is that there is an opening. The carriers are stuck with Android, but Windows Phone is lower cost per handset to them when it comes to maintenance, akin to the iPhone. They have tons of overhead on Android. Same for the OEMs. Samsung doesn't care, but HTC, LG, etc don't like the burden they have to bear with Android.

    When Verizon wants to build a WP app for their customers, Microsoft helps them. When they want to build an Android app, Google provides zero assistance. When HTC wants to build apps for WP, Microsoft helps them. For Android? Zero help from Google. Google doesn't care about Android users or OEMs or carriers. All they care about is people logging in and giving them data that allows them to sell ads. 95% of Google's revenue is all ad sales and Android's architecture has little to do with caring about user needs outside of making sure you stay so they can sell information about you and push ads to you.

    Microsoft and Apple have incentive to care about user experience in the mobile world. They have incentive to care about battery life. Google couldn't care less because Android is just there to collect more data and push more ads. OEMs needed something to compete with the iPhone and Microsoft wasn't ready while Google smartly bought someone and made it "free" (which was required anyways).

    I've found app management in my limited Android usage to be a great pain. I don't even have to think about it on my WP handset. Same on my Windows tablet. Unless I open the desktop (I have a Venue 8 Pro), I never worry about management in the Modern UI. Managing tasks is old school and very 10 years ago. I don't do it on my desktop because I have no battery, but I love that I don't have to worry about it on my mobile Windows devices. Microsoft's smart app suspension works extremely well and gives me less hassle.
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    08-28-2014 10:16 AM
  24. MDMcAtee's Avatar
    Could it be that you work in the tech sector and that you have surrounded yourself with similar people? I exist in exactly that kind of bubble and I'm always shocked at how different society is when I get ripped out of that environment and thrust into a more representative group of people (during military service).

    Just the fact that your folks like Android already puts them out of the mainstream IMHO. Most just want a phone and most are more closely tied to an OEM (due to marketing), rather than the OS itself.
    No...I work for the largest employer in my state and work with people from all walks of life and from countries all over the world...

    Posted via Windows Phone Central App
    08-28-2014 10:22 AM
  25. salmanahmad's Avatar
    I've never actually met anyone that likes Android phones. They tolerate it and think it's okay, but it's like Windows has often been looked at - I'm stuck with this and I'd prefer better.

    The M8 does better than most on Android, but I know people with S5s, S4s, Moto Droids, etc. Kudos to HTC for building a phone that handles Android and Windows Phone so well - because it is superb, but the One M8 is the best thing out there and it's not even close (other than two superior Nokia features - Camera and live audio recording).

    I get a lot of info from talking to a Verizon friend who is in corporate sales, but I also chat with AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, and Sprint reps as part of my job on a regular basis. Their impressions are that people find Android a pain. Battery life is worse than expected, performance is too. They just feel like their choice is Apple or Android - and people that don't go for the iPhone quickly have an aversion to Apple. Tech geeks love Android because they can root the phone, play around, etc, but it's not for the masses and it's poorly designed as a mobile OS. It's extremely inefficient AS IS unless the OEM dickers with it in some way.

    The sad thing from the Windows Phone angle is that there is an opening. The carriers are stuck with Android, but Windows Phone is lower cost per handset to them when it comes to maintenance, akin to the iPhone. They have tons of overhead on Android. Same for the OEMs. Samsung doesn't care, but HTC, LG, etc don't like the burden they have to bear with Android.

    When Verizon wants to build a WP app for their customers, Microsoft helps them. When they want to build an Android app, Google provides zero assistance. When HTC wants to build apps for WP, Microsoft helps them. For Android? Zero help from Google. Google doesn't care about Android users or OEMs or carriers. All they care about is people logging in and giving them data that allows them to sell ads. 95% of Google's revenue is all ad sales and Android's architecture has little to do with caring about user needs outside of making sure you stay so they can sell information about you and push ads to you.

    Microsoft and Apple have incentive to care about user experience in the mobile world. They have incentive to care about battery life. Google couldn't care less because Android is just there to collect more data and push more ads. OEMs needed something to compete with the iPhone and Microsoft wasn't ready while Google smartly bought someone and made it "free" (which was required anyways).

    I've found app management in my limited Android usage to be a great pain. I don't even have to think about it on my WP handset. Same on my Windows tablet. Unless I open the desktop (I have a Venue 8 Pro), I never worry about management in the Modern UI. Managing tasks is old school and very 10 years ago. I don't do it on my desktop because I have no battery, but I love that I don't have to worry about it on my mobile Windows devices. Microsoft's smart app suspension works extremely well and gives me less hassle.
    No doubt about HTC One M8 being a superb device but the user interface of Android is no way laggy nor unfriendly, and I can't believe how you haven't met someone that doesn't love Android, because I meet such people everyday.

    Google doesn't push out ads on my Nexus 5, and is working on resolving the issues that people have with it. If you've ever picked up a recent Android device, apart from the Samsung ones, you'll see that Android isn't laggy.

    Battery life has remained a concern for some people and Google plans to resolve that as well in Android L, with Project Volta and the ART runtime.

    The reason why the Windows Phone variant had better battery is because it doesn't allow apps to do much(if anything) in the background, you mostly have to keep an app open to do trivial things like sending a photo or video, whereas all this happens in the background on Android.

    The way Windows Phone saves battery made it very frustrating for me to do more than one task at a time.

    You are wrong about a lot of what you say.
    Wam1q likes this.
    08-28-2014 10:26 AM
49 12

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