11-25-2013 12:34 AM
37 12
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  1. Jas00555's Avatar
    No, nothing in the title is a typo

    Shop Scroogled | Microsoft Store
    11-20-2013 03:10 PM
  2. jlzimmerman's Avatar
    LOLOLOL.

    Wow, talk about burning bridges.
    11-20-2013 03:17 PM
  3. coip's Avatar
    "Keep Calm While We Steal Your Data." I almost bought that coffee mug because I thought that was hilarious, but then I decided not to because I don't want anything with a Google logo on it.
    psudotechzealot likes this.
    11-20-2013 03:37 PM
  4. gsquared's Avatar
    I like the mug.
    11-20-2013 05:01 PM
  5. tgp's Avatar
    Google responded, "Microsofts latest venture comes as no surprise; competition in the wearables space is really heating up."

    Brilliant!
    11-21-2013 05:47 PM
  6. xandros9's Avatar
    they need to step off the gas on that, it looks like negative PR for them

    never mind apple did it before, i think MS needs to realize where they stand, acknowledge people's bias and ask to just try or something
    idk
    im not a marketing major or anything
    11-21-2013 08:05 PM
  7. coip's Avatar
    Google responded, "Microsoft’s latest venture comes as no surprise; competition in the wearables space is really heating up."

    Brilliant!
    Sorry, but I don't get it. I don't get Google's response and I don't get why you think it's brilliant (where was this response posted, by the way?). What does Microsoft's decision to sell Scroogled merchandise--which is about Google's hypocritical data-stealing practices in Gmail, Search, and other services--have to do with competition in the wearable spaces. I first thought they meant wearable devices like smart watches, which makes no sense, but I assume the joke is that wearables refers to the T-shirts they are selling in the Scroogled campaign. If so, Google's response--since they state that clothing competition is heating up and that the Scroogled campaign is not a surprise--makes it sound like they think the T-shirts will be popular, otherwise it would be a surprise that they would be selling them. Nevermind the fact that Microsoft is selling more than just 'wearables', adding to the confusion of Google's response, if it is, in fact, their response.
    11-21-2013 09:02 PM
  8. Ek-Balam's Avatar
    Sorry, but I don't get it. I don't get Google's response and I don't get why you think it's brilliant (where was this response posted, by the way?). What does Microsoft's decision to sell Scroogled merchandise--which is about Google's hypocritical data-stealing practices in Gmail, Search, and other services--have to do with competition in the wearable spaces. I first thought they meant wearable devices like smart watches, which makes no sense, but I assume the joke is that wearables refers to the T-shirts they are selling in the Scroogled campaign. If so, Google's response--since they state that clothing competition is heating up and that the Scroogled campaign is not a surprise--makes it sound like they think the T-shirts will be popular, otherwise it would be a surprise that they would be selling them. Nevermind the fact that Microsoft is selling more than just 'wearables', adding to the confusion of Google's response, if it is, in fact, their response.
    Think about it a bit.......... a brilliant answer to a potential PR road bump.........
    11-21-2013 09:33 PM
  9. Harshana Abeysinghe's Avatar
    LOL... anyway just a Question,
    Do they sell Microsoft T-Shirts too?? I really wanna buy Microsoft T-Shirts or Hoddies.. but i cant find them anywhere.. .:(
    11-21-2013 09:40 PM
  10. coip's Avatar
    Think about it a bit.......... a brilliant answer to a potential PR road bump.........
    I didn't think it was that witty of a response. I'd much rather have seen them admit they are hypocrites, spouting off this "Do No Evil" mantra in public and then driving around Europe illegally filching people's data in private. Google is the worst.
    11-21-2013 09:52 PM
  11. pseudoware's Avatar
    I didn't think it was that witty of a response.
    It's a clever way of saying "that's cute, now take your 3% market share and run along."

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    FinancialP likes this.
    11-22-2013 02:14 AM
  12. Reflexx's Avatar
    I love this back and forth. It's all light hearted lined with some truth.

    Notice that Google didn't respond by denying MS's accusations. It's kind of like..

    Wife: "Is that lipstick on your collar?"
    Husband: "Ummm... Look over there! A bird!"
    11-22-2013 02:18 AM
  13. coip's Avatar
    It's a clever way of saying "that's cute, now take your 3% market share and run along."

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    Well that would be pretty myopic. These two companies are about way more than smartphone operating systems. Google may dominate smartphones, Search, and YouTube, but Microsoft dominates them in many categories too: PC operating systems, productivity software (i.e. Office), servers, gaming, and so forth. Microsoft's Scroogled campaign may be questionable, but what is not questionable is that it's right: Google is the biggest hypocrites of all the tech companies, for their the only ones that continually preached their, clearly bull****, Do No Evil mantra.
    11-22-2013 02:24 AM
  14. ag1986's Avatar
    I didn't think it was that witty of a response. I'd much rather have seen them admit they are hypocrites, spouting off this "Do No Evil" mantra in public and then driving around Europe illegally filching people's data in private. Google is the worst.
    i.e. exactly what MS want to do with Bing and tried to do with aQuantive before failing miserably?
    11-22-2013 02:52 AM
  15. coip's Avatar
    i.e. exactly what MS want to do with Bing and tried to do with aQuantive before failing miserably?
    You are misinformed. Bing is the fastest growing search engine now in terms of market share, nearing 20% and only going up while Google has dropped into the upper 60s. As for aQuantitative, perhaps if they had adopted a Google approach of abusing their users' privacy in order to capitalize on the data, they'd have turned a profit. Regardless, every big company has an acquisition or two that didn't pan out. Not every buyout can be a Skype or a YouTube. Some turn out to be an aQuantitative or a Motorola. What's your point?
    11-22-2013 03:08 AM
  16. ag1986's Avatar
    You are misinformed. Bing is the fastest growing search engine now in terms of market share, nearing 20% and only going up while Google has dropped into the upper 60s. As for aQuantitative, perhaps if they had adopted a Google approach of abusing their users' privacy in order to capitalize on the data, they'd have turned a profit. Regardless, every big company has an acquisition or two that didn't pan out. Not every buyout can be a Skype or a YouTube. Some turn out to be an aQuantitative or a Motorola. What's your point?
    Yes, just like WP is the fastest growing platform :P - percentages and growth mean nothing without absolute values for context. Also that's US-only, in Europe and other markets it's well above 90%.

    My point is that MS has a history of abusing their customers and they have been convicted in court of such practices. Nobody has ever successfully accused Google of abusing their users' privacy. And I don't understand how they are 'abusing' it either - they serve ads based on your interests, but they do not sell personal data. Google knows you're interested in baseball. Some advertiser tells Google hey, show my ads to people interested in baseball. None of your data leaves Google. How is this abuse?
    11-22-2013 03:20 AM
  17. etad putta's Avatar
    Yes, just like WP is the fastest growing platform :P - percentages and growth mean nothing without absolute values for context. Also that's US-only, in Europe and other markets it's well above 90%.

    My point is that MS has a history of abusing their customers and they have been convicted in court of such practices. Nobody has ever successfully accused Google of abusing their users' privacy. And I don't understand how they are 'abusing' it either - they serve ads based on your interests, but they do not sell personal data. Google knows you're interested in baseball. Some advertiser tells Google hey, show my ads to people interested in baseball. None of your data leaves Google. How is this abuse?
    oops...Google pays $7M fine to settle Wi-Fi privacy case | Fox News
    11-22-2013 02:09 PM
  18. etad putta's Avatar
    11-22-2013 02:11 PM
  19. coip's Avatar
    Yes, just like WP is the fastest growing platform :P - percentages and growth mean nothing without absolute values for context. Also that's US-only, in Europe and other markets it's well above 90%.

    My point is that MS has a history of abusing their customers and they have been convicted in court of such practices. Nobody has ever successfully accused Google of abusing their users' privacy. And I don't understand how they are 'abusing' it either - they serve ads based on your interests, but they do not sell personal data. Google knows you're interested in baseball. Some advertiser tells Google hey, show my ads to people interested in baseball. None of your data leaves Google. How is this abuse?
    I was going to post the same response to the nave post above. What Google did there was the most egregious violation of privacy I've ever seen in a tech company--and this is coming from a company that for years has boasted about it's "Do No Evil" mantra, making them the ultimate hypocrites. They weren't just stealing customers' data, protected by some Terms of Service agreement; they were literally stealing strangers' personal information and using it for personal profit! Lone Wolf hackers have done this and have had to serve jail time on top of massive fines. This was criminal behavior and Google should be punished accordingly. They have no credibility.
    11-22-2013 02:39 PM
  20. ag1986's Avatar
    I was going to post the same response to the nave post above. What Google did there was the most egregious violation of privacy I've ever seen in a tech company--and this is coming from a company that for years has boasted about it's "Do No Evil" mantra, making them the ultimate hypocrites. They weren't just stealing customers' data, protected by some Terms of Service agreement; they were literally stealing strangers' personal information and using it for personal profit! Lone Wolf hackers have done this and have had to serve jail time on top of massive fines. This was criminal behavior and Google should be punished accordingly. They have no credibility.
    a) If you broadcast data over open, unencrypted Wifi you should have no expectation of security. That is like using a megaphone in Times Square and then getting angry that people heard you.

    b) That it was an accident rather than a planned occurrence is denoted by the triviality of the fine - clearly the AGs knew they didn't have much of a hope of winning and so settled for the ridiculous amount of $7m.

    c) Canada and Europe found that that data was not used, was not even looked at. How much data do you think it is possible to capture driving through a street? Not like they stood outside houses for hours on end recording stuff.

    d) Explain how Google made "personal profit" out of fragments of millions of unrelated Wifi packets. Hardly like they need to steal your online banking password and get to the few thousand in the current account...
    11-22-2013 03:12 PM
  21. coip's Avatar
    a) If you broadcast data over open, unencrypted Wifi you should have no expectation of security. That is like using a megaphone in Times Square and then getting angry that people heard you.

    b) That it was an accident rather than a planned occurrence is denoted by the triviality of the fine - clearly the AGs knew they didn't have much of a hope of winning and so settled for the ridiculous amount of $7m.

    c) Canada and Europe found that that data was not used, was not even looked at. How much data do you think it is possible to capture driving through a street? Not like they stood outside houses for hours on end recording stuff.

    d) Explain how Google made "personal profit" out of fragments of millions of unrelated Wifi packets. Hardly like they need to steal your online banking password and get to the few thousand in the current account...
    a) That is the stupidest thing I've ever heard and I know of no modern judicial system with such a stupid tenet. No, that would be like someone standing in Times Square holding a $100 bill that consequently gets stolen but you think it's okay because he shouldn't have held it in front of other people. Is it stupid to have unsecured WiFi networks? Yep. Is it stupid to wave a $100 bill around Times Square? Yep. Is it okay to steal either of them? No. Stealing is stealing. Don't be obtuse

    b) An accident!? Nobody accidentally harvests a plethora of sensitive data from civilians. Don't be nave.

    c) It doesn't matter if they used the stolen data or not. Kevin Mitnick stole a **** ton of data, never used the data even once. Just collected it. He spent years in prison. How much data is possible to capture driving around? A boat load of data. Ask Max Butler how much data he got from driving around in cars stealing data from unencrypted WiFi networks. Oh wait, you can't; he's in prison. Just like Google should be.

    d) No one knows what they did with the data or how they profited from it. It doesn't matter either way. What they did was criminal and hypocritical. Why you are trying to defend such egregiously unethical behavior by a corporation that repeatedly preaches a Do-No-Evil mantra is beyond comprehension.
    11-23-2013 01:36 AM
  22. Premium1's Avatar
    And MS wonders why Google doesn't want to put any of its apps on WP. Not to mention love the jab google so subtly took at MS with the comment about the space for wearables heating up... Maybe next time MS lol
    11-23-2013 09:45 PM
  23. Reflexx's Avatar
    And MS wonders why Google doesn't want to put any of its apps on WP. Not to mention love the jab google so subtly took at MS with the comment about the space for wearables heating up... Maybe next time MS lol
    Because Google was being great to MS before, right?

    Google's hate for MS is nothing new.

    And notice how their "response" didn't deny anything MS accuses them of. They just hope that you buy their wearables so they can collect even more info about you.
    11-23-2013 10:10 PM
  24. ag1986's Avatar
    a) That is the stupidest thing I've ever heard and I know of no modern judicial system with such a stupid tenet. No, that would be like someone standing in Times Square holding a $100 bill that consequently gets stolen but you think it's okay because he shouldn't have held it in front of other people. Is it stupid to have unsecured WiFi networks? Yep. Is it stupid to wave a $100 bill around Times Square? Yep. Is it okay to steal either of them? No. Stealing is stealing. Don't be obtuse

    b) An accident!? Nobody accidentally harvests a plethora of sensitive data from civilians. Don't be nave.

    c) It doesn't matter if they used the stolen data or not. Kevin Mitnick stole a **** ton of data, never used the data even once. Just collected it. He spent years in prison. How much data is possible to capture driving around? A boat load of data. Ask Max Butler how much data he got from driving around in cars stealing data from unencrypted WiFi networks. Oh wait, you can't; he's in prison. Just like Google should be.

    d) No one knows what they did with the data or how they profited from it. It doesn't matter either way. What they did was criminal and hypocritical. Why you are trying to defend such egregiously unethical behavior by a corporation that repeatedly preaches a Do-No-Evil mantra is beyond comprehension.
    Your analogy is flawed. Think of a situation where, say, you write your PIN code on your ATM card and lose it. You tell the bank. The bank laughs and says haha, your fault. The guy who stole the card and misused it may be arrested and rightly convicted, but the bank isn't going to give you your money back.

    Dafuq? Mitnick and Butler of all people?

    Mitnick was convicted for unlawfully accessing DEC's systems (hacking here is a misnomer since he admitted all his access codes came from social engineering) and copying their IP. That is hardly comparable. His conviction and prosecution as well - it was 1988 and the laws were not really set up to handle that sort of case. And Butler? Really? He stole 2 million credit card numbers using a security flaw in frakkin Internet Explorer!.
    Premium1 likes this.
    11-24-2013 09:05 AM
  25. Premium1's Avatar
    Because Google was being great to MS before, right?

    Google's hate for MS is nothing new.

    And notice how their "response" didn't deny anything MS accuses them of. They just hope that you buy their wearables so they can collect even more info about you.
    I just find it funny that everyone acts like MS does nothing of this sorts. Sadly they all do this. All of these huge companies it seems like are in the news for some sort of lawsuit for "doing something wrong" MS just seems like the upset kid on the playground who isn't getting their way so they run around trying to talk bad about everyone else, even when they are doing the same thing. Pot meet kettle.

    *And by no means am i sticking up for what google is doing*
    11-24-2013 09:23 AM
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