07-11-2014 12:34 AM
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  1. Shad0wguy's Avatar
    iOS gets the apps first because of its user base, plus the limited amount of variations in the models they have to code for. There are only 4-5 screen resolutions across all iOS devices, and the OS is the same due to no OEM tweaking like with android.

    I think WP would be up there with iOS if the user base was higher, as MS restricts the amount of variation in devices, though not as much as iOS, but certainly more than Android.
    06-30-2014 09:20 AM
  2. Lance_WPCentral's Avatar
    In the past couple of days, its raining Official apps. And I'm sure once WP8.1 is released globally more and more Official apps will keep pouring into the WP store. Its all a matter of time and patience. With WP the word patience is very important. Over the past year a lot of progress has been achieved.
    wpfanboy17 likes this.
    06-30-2014 09:24 AM
  3. Pierre Blackwell's Avatar
    It is predicted that iOS will loose markest share to WP in the next three to four years. I do agree with the notion of patience. I'm hoping the with the official launch of WP 8.1, Cortana and Maclaren, that we'll see an ambitious approach from MSFT to show the rest of the world what WP users already know....how amazing WP is, and the unique experience it delivers that rivals iOS and Andriod.
    06-30-2014 10:01 AM
  4. Chregu's Avatar
    It is predicted that iOS will loose markest share to WP in the next three to four years. I do agree with the notion of patience. I'm hoping the with the official launch of WP 8.1, Cortana and Maclaren, that we'll see an ambitious approach from MSFT to show the rest of the world what WP users already know....how amazing WP is, and the unique experience it delivers that rivals iOS and Andriod.
    I don't think that's something that will convince people to buy a phone: "Well, you have great apps and features on the other platforms, but if you wait Windows Phone will become awesome! Probably!"

    About predictions, it's like reading the crystal ball. Current data seems to indicate the opposite: Windows Phone share sinks in U.S. and China. Can anything save this OS? | Computerworld Blogs
    06-30-2014 11:24 AM
  5. Chregu's Avatar
    I think I should explain myself here, it might be a little offtopic, but I'll do it anyway.

    In 2002 I bought my first Microsoft phone, the Orange SPV. Since then I have only used Microsoft devices, with one exception, the original Motorola RAZR for a short period of time. I owned a ton of phones, from the SPV 9000 to the HP iPAQ Voice Messenger to the HTC HD just to mention a few examples. Then Microsoft decided to discontinue Windows Mobile, and even though I was shocked about the featureless successor Windows Phone 7, I bought a Samsung Omnia 7. I moved from a small computer to a smartphone with by far the most limited feature set available on every OS.

    Back then I hoped things would improve fast. I bought a Lumia 800 and a Omnia W during this time. All we got was resizeable tiles and copy and paste before they discontinued it.

    Windows Phone 8 was from an user-perspective an exact copy of Windows Phone 7.8, only with features missing like FM radio (reintroduced later in a GDR update with great fanfare) and without Zune. Still, I bought the HTC 8X (which I think is a great phone actually) and later the Lumia 620 which I handed to my mother after a while.

    After all these years using Windows Phone right now the first real update is released with Windows Phone 8.1. An update that still has less features than Windows Mobile had. Of course, Windows Mobile needed a refresh, it needed to be made touch friendly, but Microsoft really just dumbed it down, and it's still suffering from that.

    You might now understand why I don't think Windows Phone is new and refreshing, I think it's old and stuck. You might now understand why I'm tired of waiting for the big thing to happen. I just did it for too long.
    Last edited by Chregu; 06-30-2014 at 12:11 PM.
    tgp likes this.
    06-30-2014 11:51 AM
  6. tgp's Avatar
    I think I should explain myself here, it might be a little offtopic, but I'll do it anyway.

    In 2002 I bought my first Microsoft phone, the Orange SPV. Since then I have only used Microsoft devices, with one exception, the original Motorola RAZR for a short period of time. I owned a ton of phones, from the SPV 9000 to the HP iPAQ Voice Messenger to the HTC HD just to mention a few examples. Then Microsoft decided to discontinue Windows Mobile, and even though I was shocked about the featureless successor Windows Phone 7, I bought a Samsung Omnia 7. I moved from a small computer to a smartphone with by far the most limited feature set available on every OS.

    Back then I hoped things would improve fast. I bought a Lumia 800 and a Omnia W during this time. All we got was resizeable tiles and copy and paste before they discontinued it.

    Windows Phone 8 was from an user-perspective an exact copy of Windows Phone 7.8, only with features missing like FM radio (reintroduced later in a GDR update with great fanfare) and without Zune. Still, I bought the HTC 8X (which I think is a great phone actually) and later the Lumia 625 which I handed to my mother after a while.

    After all these years using Windows Phone right now the first real update is released with Windows Phone 8.1. An update that still has less features than Windows Mobile had. Of course, Windows Mobile needed a refresh, it needed to be made touch friendly, but Microsoft really just dumbed it down, and it's still suffering from that.

    You might now understand why I don't think Windows Phone is new and refreshing, I think it's old and stuck. You might now understand why I'm tired of waiting for the big thing to happen. I just did it for too long.
    I went from WM to Android about 3 years ago. Feature-wise it was roughly similar, but Android was much more touch friendly. The only reason I switched was that I went from postpaid to prepaid. Android was pretty much the only smartphone option on prepaid back then. I had used WM for a couple years before switching to Android. So for me to take a step down in functionality from 5 years ago is difficult. That's part of why WP is still my 2nd, non primary device.
    Chregu likes this.
    06-30-2014 12:03 PM
  7. Dantekai14's Avatar
    All who thinks the app gap is closed
    Answer this

    Tell me a free video player for WP like vlc or mxplayer.

    As far as I know their is only one video player which cost you $4.

    Please do not spread wrong information. It is far from close
    06-30-2014 12:07 PM
  8. WillysJeepMan's Avatar
    In the past couple of days, its raining Official apps. And I'm sure once WP8.1 is released globally more and more Official apps will keep pouring into the WP store. Its all a matter of time and patience. With WP the word patience is very important. Over the past year a lot of progress has been achieved.
    It's all fun and games until Microsoft re-boots their mobile platform. Windows Phone 7 was released on Nov 8 2010 and on Oct 29 2012 Windows Phone 8 (which was incompatible with WP7) was released. (That wasn't the first, or even 2nd time, that Microsoft rebooted their mobile platforms)

    Other than wishful thinking and an emotional attachment to Microsoft, why should anyone buy a Windows Phone with the expectation and hope that it will someday reach a level of parity with Android and iOS?

    People should buy the device that works for them TODAY... not that MIGHT work for them 2 years from now IF things go favorably for Microsoft.

    I'm not saying or implying that Windows Phone 8 is not good, but if anyone finds it lacking, they should not gamble that those gaps will be filled.
    06-30-2014 01:03 PM
  9. MSFTisMIA's Avatar
    Personally, I never cared about the app gap. At the time MSFT was pushing the idea of better integration of services into task driven are as a called hubs. Inloked the idea of not having to jump from app to app in order to get things done. That's one of the primary reasons for joining WP after leaving iOS out of boredom and not liking how battery inefficient Android was at the time - Gingerbread going into ICS. Had a BB was getting long in the tooth.

    Now these days I only use WP and Android. There are still things on WP that has it as my daily driver, but personally I want more out of the OS itself. Yes, Apple has branded many folks into app loving consumers and on the one hand that's not a bad thing, but MSFT still hasn't done enough to both get in apps for those folks but to make sure that enough functionality exists for people like me who don't need or always want an app to do everything. Plus the hardware is uninspiring right now too - Lumia 1520, 930 and Ativ SE notwithstanding.

    Posted via Princely Purple Z Ultra
    06-30-2014 01:24 PM
  10. Keith Wallace's Avatar
    I don't think it'll be there for a while, maybe 2-3 years. We've seen this before, getting a small handful of official apps, then a few months of depression and complaining.
    MaxyBley likes this.
    06-30-2014 01:51 PM
  11. rodan01's Avatar
    The only way to close the app gap is implementing the Android runtime on Windows.
    oditius likes this.
    06-30-2014 02:52 PM
  12. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    The only way to close the app gap is implementing the Android runtime on Windows.

    I couldn't disagree more. BlackBerry has chosen to implement this strategy, and I think it will backfire on them for several reasons.

    First, while it does remove a big obstacle to people adopting the platform, it also removes a big reason to stay. Piggybacking on the Android app ecosystem makes it that much easier for people to be lured away to an Android device, because their favorite apps wil run (and run better) on it.

    Second, apps that depend on Google Services are not supported. So you will still not have access to some of the most popular Android apps out there. There will still be a perceived "app gap".

    Third, while some apps run fine in the Android runtime, others do not. There is a notable lag and drop in performance. No matter how much you improve the Android runtime performance it will still be inferior to a native app experience.

    Fourth, this will most likely kill native app development, and therefore, any hope of developing a robust native app ecosystem that will keep customers "hooked" and offer an experience other platforms cannot. MS would be foolish to kill the momentum it is gaining with WP app developers by abandoning them for the Android catalog.

    Fifth, Windows Phone has, by far, best design language, UI, and style of the 4 major platforms. It's one of the reasons my BlackBerry Z30 is sitting in a drawer right now while I try out a Lumia 822. The OS and app experience is more unified and stylistically consistent on WP, and it makes for a very fluid, pleasant user experience. Running Android apps would, in my opinion, cheapen the experience as it has with BlackBerry.
    Taigatrommel and Cleavitt76 like this.
    06-30-2014 03:25 PM
  13. Vitor Salvatore Pierce's Avatar
    Do not just have apps, must have quality apps.
    "Quantity is not quality."
    And still missing several apps, yes.
    06-30-2014 03:25 PM
  14. Pierre Blackwell's Avatar
    Windows mobile like Palm was a legacy network. Could MSFT have integrated it on the same kernel as Windows now like they're trying to do with WP8.1? I'm sure they could, but the question is resources, compatability, cost and other variables. I agree about Windows Mobile being highly functional, even better then iOS in the iPhone, but the iPhone changed all that. Its not about putting a computer in your hand, but extending a computer network to your hand. I don't think Windows mobile would've been as successful today if MSFT continues to push it. It wasn't too successful back then. Again, I understand the frustration and limit of unfulfilled expectations, but with the direction that mobile is going, I'd say MSFT is making an attempt to bring a more ambitious approach to WP. If you're using WP as your primary driver like me, or as a secondary driver like others, that position probably isn't going to change unless you find yourself either not needing the functionality of another OS or that functionality has been addressed. WP is like Hundai...in the mid to late 80's it was an appealing cheaper option to the Hondas, and Nissans of the world, but under the hood and performance wise it just didn't measure up. Hundai introduce the most aggressive warranty policy to date and began perfecting their product. Now they are one of the most successful car makers in the world. Obviously the evolution of computer technology occurs much faster, but I think WP is at a point where you're going to start to see a shift. Pick points of interest. Price, cheaper then the iPhone, and comparable to Andriod. Integration, there are more consumers out there running MSFT Os's on desktops and laptops then any other OS. Xbox 360 is the most popular gaming console. The tempation is there to complete the circle with a WP. Improve the product itself. WP8.1 is the first OS upgrade the is comparable to its competition, with some new platform exclusive applications like Cortana. The last ingredient is some good ol fashion luck, which in form of Blackberry tanking, might be the best sign for WP. Enterprises that used BB, are more compelled to gravitate to WP since many are already heavily indulged in MSFT. McLaren is going to be released on three carriers at the same time for the first time. What mark WP has in the next year will go a long way to determine the lasting impression it has and MSFT intends to into it.
    06-30-2014 03:31 PM
  15. WillysJeepMan's Avatar
    The only way to close the app gap is implementing the Android runtime on Windows.
    That's a common belief and I understand why it is appealing, but that would be the death knell for Windows Phone OS. If we examine the root cause for the app gap, we'll see that it isn't because the media is so pro-Apple, or that Google did anything underhanded to gain marketshare, but because Microsoft has repeatedly stumbled and fumbled in the mobile space.

    Many have forgotten, or were too young to remember, that the 2 big players in mobile were Palm and Microsoft. Microsoft's Windows CE, Pocket PC, and the rest were highly functional, highly flexible platforms. I developed for those early mobile platforms and did a lot of UI work as well. It had a level of ease of customization that Android still hasn't attained.

    But Microsoft squandered the lead it had. Even when Palm imploded, Microsoft found ways to snatch defeat out of the jaws of victory.

    I've lost count of how many developers got burned by putting their eggs in the Microsoft mobile basket. Once burned, twice shy. Apple seized on that distrust and rolled out the red carpet for developers. And Google later followed suit.

    Microsoft will have to work twice as hard for twice as long to regain even a fraction of the good will they wasted.

    There's no shortcut to that. There is no shortcut for establishing a good track record.
    06-30-2014 03:42 PM
  16. rodan01's Avatar
    That's a common belief and I understand why it is appealing, but that would be the death knell for Windows Phone OS. If we examine the root cause for the app gap, we'll see that it isn't because the media is so pro-Apple, or that Google did anything underhanded to gain marketshare, but because Microsoft has repeatedly stumbled and fumbled in the mobile space.

    Many have forgotten, or were too young to remember, that the 2 big players in mobile were Palm and Microsoft. Microsoft's Windows CE, Pocket PC, and the rest were highly functional, highly flexible platforms. I developed for those early mobile platforms and did a lot of UI work as well. It had a level of ease of customization that Android still hasn't attained.

    But Microsoft squandered the lead it had. Even when Palm imploded, Microsoft found ways to snatch defeat out of the jaws of victory.

    I've lost count of how many developers got burned by putting their eggs in the Microsoft mobile basket. Once burned, twice shy. Apple seized on that distrust and rolled out the red carpet for developers. And Google later followed suit.

    Microsoft will have to work twice as hard for twice as long to regain even a fraction of the good will they wasted.

    There's no shortcut to that. There is no shortcut for establishing a good track record.

    Microsoft should have stayed with DOS. Can you imagine a smartphone running DOS? That would be amazing for DOS developers.
    06-30-2014 03:52 PM
  17. ScottAB's Avatar
    I had a T-Mobile PocketPC a long time ago, that was my first experience with a mobile WinOS. It worked for me. I kept it until I excitedly bought a HD7 with WinPhone 7.0 in Nov '10. It was an improvement over what I had, but not impressive. In Jan '13 I bought a Lumia 920, I returned 13 days later because it was missing two apps I considered vital, my bank (present for WP7 but still not WP8) and MLB (ditto). I have an iPhone - yes it is a toy, however, the app experience (breadth, functionality, sheer numbers) blows away WinPhone to this day. I will keep my unlocked iPhone 5 for travels, but will most likely migrate back to WinPhone because it offers the business functions I desire.
    06-30-2014 03:57 PM
  18. XXNUZ's Avatar
    As a WP7 user, I still don't feel the app gap closing but I see it in places like WPCentral. I am planning to stick with WP for my next phone (hopefully a 925) because of what I see happening

    Sent from my purple velociraptor running Windows Phone 7.8
    06-30-2014 04:07 PM
  19. rodan01's Avatar
    BlackBerry is not a good comparison. That company has a lot of troubles and doesn't have the complementary assets that Microsoft has to build a platform.

    1. There are a lot of Android OEMs with minimal differentiation. MS would be the "Android app OEM" with more freedom to entice users with custom features.

    2. The Android ecosystem is too fragmented 30%-40%,of the Android phones can't access Google services. With X and amazon this will increase. And you have iOS too. Developers can't depend on Google services without losing billions of customers.

    3. I suppose MS will do better job than other implementations built by smaller companies.

    4. If native apps are better there is still a good incentive for native development.

    5. I think users prefer apps rather than look and feel. That's why WP has 2% of market share.
    06-30-2014 04:14 PM
  20. k0de's Avatar
    You've gotten awfully personal here. After all Microsoft is famous for releasing something and discontinuing it shortly after.

    A few examples: Zune Player , Kin phone , SPOT Smartwatch, WP7 and so on.



    That's not true. Things might change. The only thing that has changed so far is Microsoft looking for a person to make Bing usable in non-US countries. I'll believe it when I see it.
    My bad. I get excited and carried away at times.

    Things changed already at MSFT.
    06-30-2014 04:53 PM
  21. WillysJeepMan's Avatar
    You've gotten awfully personal here. After all Microsoft is famous for releasing something and discontinuing it shortly after.

    A few examples: Zune Player , Kin phone , SPOT Smartwatch, WP7 and so on.
    You might consider adding "Origami" to that list. Microsoft was making an awkward attempt at a viral campaign for this "world changing device" UMPC form-factor which fell flat. There were only a handful of over-priced underpowered devices that demonstrated just how little Microsoft's vision of mobile computing had changed since their foray into Windows tablets in late '99/early '00.
    06-30-2014 05:05 PM
  22. k0de's Avatar
    No the app gap will not close because the startup mobile developers target iOS exclusive 80% of the time, Android the other 20%. Windows OSes are literally frozen out for various reasons(poor APIs, low user base, hatred towards MS).
    True for startup apps. But not existing apps. And for how long will this hold ground?
    06-30-2014 06:05 PM
  23. WillysJeepMan's Avatar
    True for startup apps. But not existing apps. And for how long will this hold ground?
    For existing apps, developers are under even more pressure to focus on iOS and Android. Competition is fierce in those ecosystems. Manpower is always at a deficit. These developers are not going to risk diverting resource to create a WP version of their apps at the expense of refining and enhancing their iOS and Android versions.

    It comes down to, and always has come down to, the install base of WP users, Microsoft's track record of (lack of) commitment, and return on investment.
    k0de likes this.
    06-30-2014 06:10 PM
  24. k0de's Avatar
    For existing apps, developers are under even more pressure to focus on iOS and Android. Competition is fierce in those ecosystems. Manpower is always at a deficit. These developers are not going to risk diverting resource to create a WP version of their apps at the expense of refining and enhancing their iOS and Android versions.

    It comes down to, and always has come down to, the install base of WP users, Microsoft's track record of (lack of) commitment, and return on investment.
    ROI is the bottom line.

    IOS dev can continue developing for iOS. And Droids dev like wise.

    But Where is the lost when deploying a WP app? A WP team of dev perhaps are more productive other than Droid or iOS dev's.

    Please elaborate how there is a risk of a lost on ROI by developing for WP?
    06-30-2014 06:23 PM
  25. btgusto's Avatar
    Only way the gap closes is if devs stop creating apps for ios and android and focus on windows. The other platforms already have a million app lead on us. When we get one official app that they already have they get new apps that we wont get for months if at all. Apps rarely get simultaneous releases on all three platforms (blackberry's out ;P)

    I do believe the rate at which windows apps and official apps entering the store will increase. we currently have about 250,000+ apps right? Well I believe the next 250,000 will come at a faster rate that the first quarter million. and the subsequent 250,000 will come even faster at an exponential growth chart.

    But we won't catch ios. Apple has to fall flat on its face for that to happen. Or the "cool" factor needs to shift like it did for Facebook and Instagram. At one point Facebook was for everyone but then kids shifted their focus to Instagram because they saw Facebook as for only parents and grandparents or just older people in general. Windows needs that type of shift
    06-30-2014 06:29 PM
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