03-23-2015 01:40 PM
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  1. Visa Declined's Avatar
    The app gap has as much to do with an app being much less quality & updated compared to iOS counterparts as not being in the Windows Store itself.
    Much of the quality problem stems from the fact that Microsoft is paying developers to make apps for Windows Phone. Developers are doing a "good enough" job to get paid, and then they ignore the app or game from that point on. That's what happened with Instagram, and it won't ever get an update.
    08-11-2014 12:27 AM
  2. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    Much of the quality problem stems from the fact that Microsoft is paying developers to make apps for Windows Phone. Developers are doing a "good enough" job to get paid, and then they ignore the app or game from that point on. That's what happened with Instagram, and it won't ever get an update.
    Honstly, I've lost respect for these popular multibillion dollar services which either ain't developing for WP or if they are, that is bad quality, like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Soundcloud, Google maps, Youtube. And honestly if MS ever came out with native apps on its platform as an alternative, I'm totally jumping ship from them. Business strategy or not, there is no pretext for ignoring 2.4% which actually forms millions of people. And although they have millions of dollars of business, they can't reassign some of it to develop for millions of people. F*** them.
    08-12-2014 06:58 PM
  3. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    Back in the WP7-Mango days it was pretty obvious why the OS wasn't successful: it was missing many features and the app gap was massive. Nowadays, most of the important features are there (Digital Assistant, Folders, Notification Centre...) and the app gap is lessening. Yes the app gap still exists, anyone denying this is a fool but because many official apps are now available I would say most people could carry a WP as their daily driver. So why don't they? The obvious answer for me is hardware. Sure Nokia has released some great phones over the last 2 years but let's be honest, they are all rehashed designs, improved iterations of the Lumia 800. I can already hear the screams about Apple and Samsung doing the exact same thing but the thing is Apple is in a world of its own so you can't really compare to them. They could sell 50 toothpicks and get away with it. As for Samsung, sure they keep the same design but every new phone comes with its own suit of new (albeit mostly useless) features that look great on TV or at the phone shop. But more importantly, from a user's perspective, if you don't like the Galaxy S5 design you can go with the HTC One, Xperia Z or LG G3. If you don't like the Lumia design, what are you left with? Well, you're left with checking out the android line-up.
    Some will blame the employees in the aforementioned phone shops but really can you blame them? On one end you could present your customer with 4-5 state of the art phones or on the other end you could convince them to go with that Nokia phone that's mostly the same as that other one but takes better pictures unless they want that old HTC/Samsung phone that may or may not be still supported. What would you do?
    I'm not even going to enter the mess that is the American carrier business but the bottom line is this: more than additional official apps, Windows Phone needs to bring back Samsung and LG so they release truly modern and feature packed high phones like they are on android. They also need to get Sony on board and HTC committed beyond the HTC One W8. Great hardware sells and great sales attract developers. It's up to Microsoft to sell that message to other OEMs.
    I agree. I mean, there are currently two main flagships to choose from (as the Ativ SE is a Verizon exclusive), the 930/Icon and 1520. But if those don't appeal to people, like me, then you are screwed. I am glad there will be more devices from other OEM's, but it would be nice if they weren't exclusives. Another reason why WPs don't sell as much. In many places, ESPECIALLY the US, every Windows Phone we have here is either an exclusive to one or two carriers, and the other carrier might get the same phone, but different design.

    No exclusivity+more devices to choose from=better sales
    08-12-2014 07:05 PM
  4. janil17's Avatar
    No exclusivity+more devices to choose from=better sales
    Definitely! I really like the Nokia 930/Icon phone, and the HTC One for Windows looks great, but neither of those are available or predicted to be available on T-Mobile (U.S.)

    Having a choice between a Lumia 635 and a Lumia 625 is not good enough for me.

    So I either need to switch carriers to get a decent phone, or I need to switch to another phone OS. I don't think I should have to make that choice, and I am not currently happy with T-Mobile or Microsoft at the moment.

    My phone (HTC 8x) is falling apart, including a missing volume button. I can keep it working until IFA.. I hope I have better choices at that time. I've used Windows Phone for 4 years in December and don't want to switch to another OS.
    08-12-2014 08:13 PM
  5. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    Definitely! I really like the Nokia 930/Icon phone, and the HTC One for Windows looks great, but neither of those are available or predicted to be available on T-Mobile (U.S.)

    Having a choice between a Lumia 635 and a Lumia 625 is not good enough for me.

    So I either need to switch carriers to get a decent phone, or I need to switch to another phone OS. I don't think I should have to make that choice, and I am not currently happy with T-Mobile or Microsoft at the moment.

    My phone (HTC 8x) is falling apart, including a missing volume button. I can keep it working until IFA.. I hope I have better choices at that time. I've used Windows Phone for 4 years in December and don't want to switch to another OS.

    I completely understand. Since Microkia only cares about budget phones now, we probably wont see a high end flagship from them for awhile. That leads me to wanting the W8, but I'm on AT&T, so that leads me to switching to Android, probably for the Moto X+1.
    08-12-2014 08:47 PM
  6. spaulagain's Avatar
    I completely understand. Since Microkia only cares about budget phones now, we probably wont see a high end flagship from them for awhile. That leads me to wanting the W8, but I'm on AT&T, so that leads me to switching to Android, probably for the Moto X+1.
    People really need to stop jumping to conclusions. You think maybe MS is waiting for threshold to launch new flag ship devices?

    I was hoping for a new flagship this fall too, but I certainly wouldn't jump ship to Android because I might have to wait a few more months for more robust flagship with the next big version of Windows.
    08-13-2014 12:34 AM
  7. Torcher Death's Avatar
    People really need to stop jumping to conclusions. You think maybe MS is waiting for threshold to launch new flag ship devices?

    I was hoping for a new flagship this fall too, but I certainly wouldn't jump ship to Android because I might have to wait a few more months for more robust flagship with the next big version of Windows.
    & the odds of them releasing it with flaming hot, outdated hardware are very high.
    unstoppablekem likes this.
    08-13-2014 12:46 AM
  8. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    People really need to stop jumping to conclusions. You think maybe MS is waiting for threshold to launch new flag ship devices?

    I was hoping for a new flagship this fall too, but I certainly wouldn't jump ship to Android because I might have to wait a few more months for more robust flagship with the next big version of Windows.

    Oh YAY, the Waiting Game (trademarked by Microsoft/Nokia), YAY! I guess I'll keep holding on to my 920 for EVEN longer and wait till Spring 2015! It will probably have the Snapdragon 805, wow! By then Android phones will have the Snapdragon 808 and 810, but who cares, Android needs so much power because it's LagDroid! I have proof, as I just used the Samsung Galaxy S1, and BOY it's laggy! That means for sure Android is still laggy on all phones! BEFORE MWC 2014, I was hoping there would be new devices at //build. And there was, the 6 month old Icon, just a global variant! So revolutionary! Who cares that it's too fat, too heavy, too big, no microSD, and only on one carrier in the US, because I'll be willing to spend $1000 on a phone that isn't worthy of replacing my 920, even if it doesn't work 100% with my network!

    Sorry for the over sarcasm, but I had to get it out. You have to feel us 920 users' pain.
    AG VK likes this.
    08-13-2014 01:27 AM
  9. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    & the odds of them releasing it with flaming hot, outdated hardware are very high.

    And the first 10 batches of phones will have some kind of issues, lol. Nokia hasn't still gained my trust with their quality checks.
    08-13-2014 01:29 AM
  10. Tahiti Bob's Avatar
    That's the issue, its not a lack of hardware choice, it's a lack of carrier support. Hopefully now with Microsoft in charge, they can throw some muscle at the carriers and get them to support a wide range of WP devices.

    I purposefully didn't address the issues of the US market, this goes beyond Windows Phone or Microsoft. The whole way of buying and selling phones over there is messed up and the US government really should take a proper look at it. So I'm looking at it from a European perspective where I can buy pretty much any phone and use it on any carrier and still I can only go with Nokia if I want a relatively new Windows Phone device. That or I can have a look at the much more varied Android line-up.
    08-13-2014 04:03 AM
  11. fatclue_98's Avatar
    I purposefully didn't address the issues of the US market, this goes beyond Windows Phone or Microsoft. The whole way of buying and selling phones over there is messed up and the US government really should take a proper look at it. So I'm looking at it from a European perspective where I can buy pretty much any phone and use it on any carrier and still I can only go with Nokia if I want a relatively new Windows Phone device. That or I can have a look at the much more varied Android line-up.
    There are those who say the government interferes too much in the affairs of the private sector. This is not an indictment or an endorsement of this view, just a tip to someone who's perplexed regarding carriers and how they operate in the US.


    Sent from my iPhone using WPCentral Forums
    08-13-2014 01:17 PM
  12. radmanvr's Avatar
    Skimmed through most of the stuff.

    What is this attitude that there has to be a be-all-end-all, alpha-omega, one phone to rule them all.

    You get the phone that fits you the most and I think Microsoft's Windows Phone is a niche phone which will only attract the people its designed for. Why does WP need to be the one phone to rule them all. Let that be Android.

    Also saw some folks talking about people who buy by the numbers not quality this is true for me also I bought an FX-8320 because it was 8-Core CPU and it was so slow at single core compute power that I had to get an i5 4670k 4 core. I originally thought 8core > 4core but that wasn't the case. Maybe its different with phones idk not a phone expert.

    P.S I'd rather see people argue over which Burger is the one burger to rule them all. I choose Fuddruckers.
    08-13-2014 01:45 PM
  13. tgp's Avatar
    P.S I'd rather see people argue over which Burger is the one burger to rule them all. I choose Fuddruckers.
    Good idea. Five Guys for my burger!
    08-13-2014 01:46 PM
  14. Tahiti Bob's Avatar
    Skimmed through most of the stuff.

    What is this attitude that there has to be a be-all-end-all, alpha-omega, one phone to rule them all.

    You get the phone that fits you the most and I think Microsoft's Windows Phone is a niche phone which will only attract the people its designed for. Why does WP need to be the one phone to rule them all. Let that be Android.

    Also saw some folks talking about people who buy by the numbers not quality this is true for me also I bought an FX-8320 because it was 8-Core CPU and it was so slow at single core compute power that I had to get an i5 4670k 4 core. I originally thought 8core > 4core but that wasn't the case. Maybe its different with phones idk not a phone expert.

    P.S I'd rather see people argue over which Burger is the one burger to rule them all. I choose Fuddruckers.

    You skimmed through the wrong posts, the OP is absolutely not about specs war.
    08-13-2014 03:16 PM
  15. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    Good idea. Five Guys for my burger!


    Oh HELL NO! In N Out FTW! :P
    tgp likes this.
    08-13-2014 09:10 PM
  16. fatclue_98's Avatar
    How 'bout the Royale with cheese or the Kahuna burger?


    Sent from my iPhone using WPCentral Forums
    08-14-2014 12:44 PM
  17. Tahiti Bob's Avatar
    Windows Phone share down to 2.5%, everything is going great.
    Sent from my Lumia 1520 using Tapatalk
    08-14-2014 04:31 PM
  18. tgp's Avatar
    Oh HELL NO! In N Out FTW! :P
    No In N Out where I live unfortunately! I've never been to one. I'd like to go to the famous one, at least famous among planespotters, near LAX. I'm interested in commercial aviation as well.
    08-15-2014 09:56 AM
  19. fatclue_98's Avatar
    "You mind if I have some of your tasty beverage to wash this down?"
    What?


    Sent from my iPhone using WPCentral Forums
    08-15-2014 10:25 AM
  20. Visa Declined's Avatar
    What?
    Say WHAT again, I dare you, I double dare you mother f*#**r!
    08-15-2014 11:59 AM
  21. fatclue_98's Avatar
    Do I look like a b***h?
    08-15-2014 12:04 PM
  22. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    No In N Out where I live unfortunately! I've never been to one. I'd like to go to the famous one, at least famous among planespotters, near LAX. I'm interested in commercial aviation as well.

    It's SO GOOD!
    08-15-2014 04:55 PM
  23. anony_mouse's Avatar
    There are those who say the government interferes too much in the affairs of the private sector. This is not an indictment or an endorsement of this view, just a tip to someone who's perplexed regarding carriers and how they operate in the US.
    I'm also confused about the situation in the US. In Europe, and as far as I know pretty much anywhere else in the world, you have up to four choices:
    1. Get a contract with an operator, including a phone. The phone may be tied to that operator and may have been customised by that operator (although that's not always the case, and operator bloatware is rather unpopular these days). The contract will typically run for 1-2 years, and the cost of the phone is paid over the life of the contract, sometimes with an upfront payment.
    2. Get a pay as you go phone via an operator. This may have some discount on the full price of the phone, and some operator lock, bloatware, and/or bundled credit.
    3. Buy a generic phone, unlocked and without carrier bloatware, and a SIM only contract with an operator. You pay the full price of the phone upfront, and it belongs to you and can be used with any compatible operator (which will usually be all of them across most countries in the world). The contract will typically run month by month (although you may get a discount for a longer term) and prices are often very low.
    4. Buy a phone outright as in 3, and get a pay as you go SIM.

    Depending on local regulation, 1 and 2 may not be available in all countries. The system is underpinned in some cases by local regulation requiring operators to use certain standards, such as the GSM family, which covers not only the air interface but also the SIM and certain other features. Number portability is available in many countries so customers can move between operators without changing their phone number. This provides for a degree of ongoing competition between operators and limits, to some degree, restrictive practices and lock in. The cheap availability of GSM equipment (both phones and network equipment) means that even where regulation doesn't exist, a similar model is usually followed.

    Personally I go for option 3, as it works out cheaper overall (although with greater upfront cost) and is much more flexible. My monthly cost is around 10-15 euros. I could probably do even better by changing operators every few months (while keeping the same phone), but generally I have better things to do.

    How are things different in the US? Which options are not available, and are additional options available?
    08-21-2014 07:08 AM
  24. fatclue_98's Avatar
    I'm also confused about the situation in the US. In Europe, and as far as I know pretty much anywhere else in the world, you have up to four choices:
    1. Get a contract with an operator, including a phone. The phone may be tied to that operator and may have been customised by that operator (although that's not always the case, and operator bloatware is rather unpopular these days). The contract will typically run for 1-2 years, and the cost of the phone is paid over the life of the contract, sometimes with an upfront payment.
    2. Get a pay as you go phone via an operator. This may have some discount on the full price of the phone, and some operator lock, bloatware, and/or bundled credit.
    3. Buy a generic phone, unlocked and without carrier bloatware, and a SIM only contract with an operator. You pay the full price of the phone upfront, and it belongs to you and can be used with any compatible operator (which will usually be all of them across most countries in the world). The contract will typically run month by month (although you may get a discount for a longer term) and prices are often very low.
    4. Buy a phone outright as in 3, and get a pay as you go SIM.

    Depending on local regulation, 1 and 2 may not be available in all countries. The system is underpinned in some cases by local regulation requiring operators to use certain standards, such as the GSM family, which covers not only the air interface but also the SIM and certain other features. Number portability is available in many countries so customers can move between operators without changing their phone number. This provides for a degree of ongoing competition between operators and limits, to some degree, restrictive practices and lock in. The cheap availability of GSM equipment (both phones and network equipment) means that even where regulation doesn't exist, a similar model is usually followed.

    Personally I go for option 3, as it works out cheaper overall (although with greater upfront cost) and is much more flexible. My monthly cost is around 10-15 euros. I could probably do even better by changing operators every few months (while keeping the same phone), but generally I have better things to do.

    How are things different in the US? Which options are not available, and are additional options available?
    I was responding to a previous post from a European brother who couldn't understand why the US government doesn't get involved with the telecoms and their business practices.


    Sent from my iPhone using WPCentral Forums
    08-21-2014 01:17 PM
  25. anony_mouse's Avatar
    I was responding to a previous post from a European brother who couldn't understand why the US government doesn't get involved with the telecoms and their business practices.


    Sent from my iPhone using WPCentral Forums
    Thanks for that. But maybe you could help explain the situation in the US so that the rest of us can understand it?
    Felix Bank likes this.
    08-21-2014 03:45 PM
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