08-22-2014 06:33 PM
30 12
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  1. theefman's Avatar
    Makes a nice change from the usual click bait, pros and some cons discussed.

    http://www.zdnet.com/the-windows-pho...er-7000032820/
    08-21-2014 12:04 PM
  2. salmanahmad's Avatar
    Makes a nice change from the usual click bait, pros and some cons discussed.

    http://www.zdnet.com/the-windows-pho...er-7000032820/
    I've read one of her previous articles since trying out Windows Phone she talks to negatively about Android, often telling lies about Android during the process.

    She's not balanced and I don't see why she works at Zdnet.
    08-21-2014 12:49 PM
  3. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    So anyone who talks about android's security problems(even when google execs themselves admit android wasn't developed with security in mind), tells lies?
    Or if someone doesn't like google services because they poach your personal data to better target users with data is a lie?
    elmacho and Guytronic like this.
    08-21-2014 01:14 PM
  4. salmanahmad's Avatar
    So anyone who talks about android's security problems(even when google execs themselves admit android wasn't developed with security in mind), tells lies?
    Or if someone doesn't like google services because they poach your personal data to better target users with data is a lie?
    Every operating system has its share of faults and flaws but she isn't simply balanced. I'm pretty sure that tomorrow if her Windows Phone breaks and she moves onto an Android she is start going to say things against Windows Phone.

    The Google executive never said that Android wasn't built with security in mind, he was implying that security wasn't the biggest concern in the operating system not that it was never in mind.

    If you are really afraid of your data being poached, that can also be done on iOS and Windows Phone. Android actually has dedicated solutions for privacy.

    Ever heard of Blackphone? Or about Cyanogenmod's secure SMS encryption? If Google really wanted to poach your data why would it allow these operating systems and OEMs to run on it?

    My point still stands, she's not balanced in her criticism, read her previous article as well. She said something about Android having "unfinished BETAs" and I have yet to find any apps like that.
    colinkiama likes this.
    08-21-2014 02:04 PM
  5. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    And I specifically said google poaches data through google services. Ofcourse, not many people care about it. But for those who do, it doesn't make any less of a concern as google make it be.

    I'm sure there are 3rd party solutions for security. And wasn't black phone was the one that got hacked within five minutes on its first encounter? Lol.

    And I'm not defending her. Like she said, "Everything is hackable. It is only a matter of how much time and resources it takes."
    And as you said, "Every OS has its share of goods and flaws." But for google, security isn't much of a concern. Of course, personal preferences differ.
    08-21-2014 02:39 PM
  6. salmanahmad's Avatar
    And I specifically said google poaches data through google services. Ofcourse, not many people care about it. But for those who do, it doesn't make any less of a concern as google make it be.

    I'm sure there are 3rd party solutions for security. And wasn't black phone was the one that got hacked within five minutes on its first encounter? Lol.

    And I'm not defending her. Like she said, "Everything is hackable. It is only a matter of how much time and resources it takes."
    And as you said, "Every OS has its share of goods and flaws." But for google, security isn't much of a concern. Of course, personal preferences differ.
    People hack the operating system that is used the most, which is mostly the case.

    Windows Phone can also be hacked but since a very small majority uses it, no one cares(which is a good thing)

    Google does offer OTA security patches via Google Play Services, it isn't meant to poach data.
    08-21-2014 02:44 PM
  7. colinkiama's Avatar
    Every operating system has its share of faults and flaws but she isn't simply balanced. I'm pretty sure that tomorrow if her Windows Phone breaks and she moves onto an Android she is start going to say things against Windows Phone.

    The Google executive never said that Android wasn't built with security in mind, he was implying that security wasn't the biggest concern in the operating system not that it was never in mind.

    If you are really afraid of your data being poached, that can also be done on iOS and Windows Phone. Android actually has dedicated solutions for privacy.

    Ever heard of Blackphone? Or about Cyanogenmod's secure SMS encryption? If Google really wanted to poach your data why would it allow these operating systems and OEMs to run on it?

    My point still stands, she's not balanced in her criticism, read her previous article as well. She said something about Android having "unfinished BETAs" and I have yet to find any apps like that.
    The article is totally biased but I'm happy about that. Writers are usually biased against windows phone in the first place, which make users steer away from the platform. The writer probably wants the market share to increase. Can't you understand that?
    Nerdy Woman and Guytronic like this.
    08-21-2014 02:53 PM
  8. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    It can be but it is more difficult for it since it is more secure than android.

    And those security patches are for general use. Everyone knows about Gmail being scanned and all. Most people aren't aware of it and most may not care at all. But for those who think it is creepy, you can't tell them that it is a lie.
    mtmt88 likes this.
    08-21-2014 02:54 PM
  9. salmanahmad's Avatar
    The article is totally biased but I'm happy about that. Writers are usually biased against windows phone in the first place, which make users steer away from the platform. The writer probably wants the market share to increase. Can't you understand that?
    No, you can't say that. There are some writers that could be biased, like the retards in the CNET podcast.

    But the mainstream reviewers, even those who absolutely love Google and it's services have still given very positive reviews about Windows Phone that are not biased.

    Go watch Marques Brownlee's review of the Lumia 920, 1020 and 1520. He talks a lot about how amazing the camera is and how the Windows Phone Store gets better day by day.

    Pocketnow also speaks very positively about most Windows Phones.

    You don't have to biased to get people to buy a device.

    It can be but it is more difficult for it since it is more secure than android.

    And those security patches are for general use. Everyone knows about Gmail being scanned and all. Most people aren't aware of it and most may not care at all. But for those who think it is creepy, you can't tell them that it is a lie.
    Your assumption about Windows Phone is just that, an assumption. What makes you think Windows Phone is more secure?

    If you think Gmail is being scanned, don't use it. Use Outlook.com or Yahoo.
    08-21-2014 03:18 PM
  10. DoctorSaline's Avatar

    Your assumption about Windows Phone is just that, an assumption. What makes you think Windows Phone is more secure?

    If you think Gmail is being scanned, don't use it. Use Outlook.com or Yahoo.
    ...
    Got ya!
    08-21-2014 03:44 PM
  11. bilzkh's Avatar
    Android's security problems have more to do with the reality that people aren't great with their technology than the inherent issues with Android. It's just like Windows in that if you know what you're doing, it's a generally pleasant experience. In fact, some iterations of it, e.g. Xiaomi MIUI, look really nice.
    salmanahmad likes this.
    08-21-2014 04:47 PM
  12. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    Android's security problems have more to do with the reality that people aren't great with their technology than the inherent issues with Android. It's just like Windows in that if you know what you're doing, it's a generally pleasant experience. In fact, some iterations of it, e.g. Xiaomi MIUI, look really nice.
    So, you mean Android as an OS (in a pure form, without 3rd party protection software) is as secure as windows phone? We are not talking about user experience either.
    08-21-2014 05:00 PM
  13. bilzkh's Avatar
    So, you mean Android as an OS (in a pure form, without 3rd party protection software) is as secure as windows phone? We are not talking about user experience either.
    Well I'd say the word "secure" for Windows Phone also refers to it being "locked down" compared to Android. If someone wants more granular control, options, versatility, etc, they'd probably prefer Android and its insecurity (which they know how to deal with) than Windows Phone, which is - in their view - "limited."

    But to answer your question, I'd say Android should be a no-no for a person who isn't a tech enthusiast, but I'd have to apply the same rationale to Windows (hence my suggestion in another thread to have an opt-in locked-down mode for the OS which only installs white-listed applications).
    08-21-2014 11:06 PM
  14. AG VK's Avatar
    The article is totally biased but I'm happy about that. Writers are usually biased against windows phone in the first place, which make users steer away from the platform. The writer probably wants the market share to increase. Can't you understand that?
    So first of all, I don't know if you're just an extreme fanboi or a paid astroturfer. You're ok with writers being biased as long as the bias is in favour of WP? And why should the writer or readers care about market share?
    08-22-2014 01:36 AM
  15. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    Well I'd say the word "secure" for Windows Phone also refers to it being "locked down" compared to Android. If someone wants more granular control, options, versatility, etc, they'd probably prefer Android and its insecurity (which they know how to deal with) than Windows Phone, which is - in their view - "limited."
    Exactly. Windows phone is more secure than android because it is locked down. It is one of the key distinction of windows phone from android. Albeit at the cost of less power to the developers which might in turn means less than favorable experience for the users but that is another story.

    Thus, it is a fact that windows phone is more secure than android.
    Although, yes, windows phone can also be breakable albeit with more difficulty while anyone can have a safe experience on android if they are careful in their use.
    08-22-2014 02:23 AM
  16. salmanahmad's Avatar
    Exactly. Windows phone is more secure than android because it is locked down. It is one of the key distinction of windows phone from android. Albeit at the cost of less power to the developers which might in turn means less than favorable experience for the users but that is another story.

    Thus, it is a fact that windows phone is more secure than android.
    Although, yes, windows phone can also be breakable albeit with more difficulty while anyone can have a safe experience on android if they are careful in their use.
    Windows Phone is locked down in what sense? Not being unlock the bootloader and rooting? Or something else?
    08-22-2014 05:48 AM
  17. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    Windows Phone is locked down in what sense? Not being unlock the bootloader and rooting? Or something else?
    Yes, that. And modern apps/games in windows phone/windows RT/PCs run in a sandbox environment with less to no files access and permissions.
    elmacho likes this.
    08-22-2014 06:07 AM
  18. salmanahmad's Avatar
    Yes, that. And modern apps/games in windows phone/windows RT/PCs run in a sandbox environment with less to no files access and permissions.


    Access to what files and permissions? Dude do you even know what you are talking about? What extra files and permissions does Android give to apps?Android being open does not mean it's easier to viruses in it.
    08-22-2014 06:55 AM
  19. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    Access to what files and permissions? Dude do you even know what you are talking about? What extra files and permissions does Android give to apps?Android being open does not mean it's easier to viruses in it.
    I know what I'm talking about, do you? What do you think rooting or root access means? Or how it is able to change so many things things about pure android? Or let users bypass OS restrictions? Do you think hackers and malwares can't get advantage of that? Openness of android while advantageous has also a major flaw in terms that it can be exploited by any coder in the world.
    elmacho likes this.
    08-22-2014 07:08 AM
  20. salmanahmad's Avatar
    I know what I'm talking about, do you? What do you think rooting or root access means? Or how it is able to change so many things things about pure android? Or let users bypass OS restrictions? Do you think hackers and malwares can't get advantage of that? Openness of android while advantageous has also a major flaw in terms that it can be exploited by any coder in the world.
    Of course I know about this. But you are saying that "rooting" makes an Android device less secure, so pretty much everyone who doesn't root won't get viruses?Nope. iOS, Android and Windows Phone all can get viruses.As far as the rooting argument goes, you have to grant apps superuser before they can add malware to your device, why would you even allow an app that doesn't need root? Plus people who root are often smarter than the average person.

    Android's openness doesn't mean it can get more viruses. People target it because it's the operating system being used the most around the world.
    08-22-2014 07:11 AM
  21. DoctorSaline's Avatar
    I'm saying that the very reason that android can be rooted implies that it is less secure than say windows phone. You might want to read that less secure part again. I never said that windows phone is unbreakable. But the very reason that windows phone is locked means that hackers and people targeting malware will have to make extra effort and work arounds before they can actually harm a device and that means they need more resources and more time consumption and more difficulty. You don't want to accept that fact, it is totally fine with me.
    Of course, I know that android is more targeted because like developers, hackers are targeting OS with more user base.
    08-22-2014 07:22 AM
  22. osallent's Avatar
    Someone mentioned the Blackphone as an example of Android security. It's only one of the laggiest and most restrictive phones in the market, and for all the security hackers were able to root one in 5 minutes.
    elmacho and Laura Knotek like this.
    08-22-2014 08:41 AM
  23. Jazmac's Avatar
    Makes a nice change from the usual click bait, pros and some cons discussed.

    The Windows phone: One month later | ZDNet
    I had to look up a few times to make sure I wasn't on WPCentral reading this. "Brave" is the word that comes to mind. Good read.
    Guytronic likes this.
    08-22-2014 08:53 AM
  24. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Someone mentioned the Blackphone as an example of Android security. It's only one of the laggiest and most restrictive phones in the market, and for all the security hackers were able to root one in 5 minutes.

    http://crackberry.com/blackphone-no-...thin-5-minutes
    08-22-2014 08:59 AM
  25. realwarder's Avatar
    Access to what files and permissions? Dude do you even know what you are talking about? What extra files and permissions does Android give to apps?Android being open does not mean it's easier to viruses in it.
    Even the most diehard Android fan acknowledges that Windows Phone 8 is more secure. I have never heard of a Windows Phone 8+ device being 'rooted'. No app has broken out of the multi-layer sandbox mechanism that exists. Apps cannot 'listen' for data from other apps as there are no APIs that enable that. Each app basically runs isolated and that's it. End of story. No viruses, nothing. Which equates to more secure.

    I could list about a billion articles about Android being rooted, stealing info from other apps etc. Let's look at CBS News today:

    New hack could steal personal information from Gmail, other popular apps - CBS News

    Didn't have to go far.
    08-22-2014 10:10 AM
30 12

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