11-29-2014 02:31 PM
49 12
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  1. TechFreak1's Avatar
    Well that shows that the simple, fluid & elegant UI of windows phone is really easy to use and to be honest most of these so called "techies" probably haven't even jail broken their iphone or rooted an android phone.

    To get the best out of an iphone you have to jail break it otherwise there is really no point in buying a smartphone with a 64bit arm soc just to use make calls, text, use social media & take the pictures / videos. Any low end windows phone can do that and last longer than your average iphone.
    prasath1234 likes this.
    11-26-2014 11:56 PM
  2. iamtim's Avatar
    ...most of these so called "techies" probably haven't even jail broken their iphone or rooted an android phone. To get the best out of an iphone you have to jail break it...
    I don't know if it's possible to roll my eyes any harder than I did after reading that. No, seriously, I think I sprained my ocular nerve rolling my eyes so hard.
    11-27-2014 12:20 AM
  3. Keith Wallace's Avatar
    You've misunderstood the statement. The reason people say it is that it's an interface with big, bright icons. It's easy for older people and younger people to grasp and do basic things right away. You don't have to worry about app pages and app drawers, just two screens.

    It's not said to mean that the technologically inclined would shun the platform, it's to say that it is a very easy platform to pick up on. You can remove the bloatware without knowing how to root a device, like on Android, which helps grandma avoid mistakenly using data on stuff she doesn't understand. It just has such a simplistic, personalized approach, that you don't need to do as much coaching of a newer smartphone user, as opposed to iOS or Android (particularly the latter, where you have the bloatware and background processes running amok and such).
    11-27-2014 03:27 AM
  4. prasath1234's Avatar
    It's for first time smart phone users who still haven't spent much on other ecosystems.

    But again, Windows Phone is for everyone who wants a different and smooth experience.

    These so-called "experts" that say this are the same people who said Windows Phone 8 was dead on arrival and 2 years after the launch of WP8, Lumia sales are at an all time high even without a flagship.
    What sales high I heard wp even in low end is being beaten by Chinese android.Is it so ha haaa
    11-27-2014 04:23 AM
  5. CapoFantasma97's Avatar
    Windows Phone is perfect for everyone, from the people who never had contacts with smartphones and PCs before, to the most advanced users.

    The ignorance to this platform and the false believes like "WP sucks and it's difficult" "WP lacks tons of important apps like Whatsapp" (really? Wat? Yes, I heard that not long time ago, blasphemies!), doesn't make a good reputation to the ones who want to buy a good phone.



    Seriously, around 3 months passed since I attend this new school (I moved during summer) and my classmates are still asking me "How many mpxl has your Nokia? 42? 85?" "let me see the camera" "try to make a photo" "oh yeah that makes great photos, but it has so few apps..."
    11-27-2014 04:39 AM
  6. petergoogle's Avatar
    Based on experimenting with family members and friends, WP is the easier to learn. The UI is very clean, minimalist and focusing on readability. iOS is a close 2nd, and Android is the most difficult. (due to the wide range of customization depending on manufacturer)
    11-27-2014 01:54 PM
  7. thesachd's Avatar
    Based on experimenting with family members and friends, WP is the easier to learn. The UI is very clean, minimalist and focusing on readability. iOS is a close 2nd, and Android is the most difficult. (due to the wide range of customization depending on manufacturer)
    Actually that is mostly incorrect.

    iOS and Android and Windows Phone are pretty easy to set up after setting up when your apps from the Play Store they show up on your home screen, on both iOS and Android making it easier for people to reach their favourite apps.

    On Windows Phone you no apps are automatically pinned and most people either need to learn how to pin an app or swipe right and always scroll to find it.

    Not to mention the complicated mess of Windows Phone that is the settings app, and setting up lock screen notifications is also harder than Android and iOS.

    So no Windows Phone isn't easier to use.

    There are other reasons why Windows Phone is good for people being introduced to smart phones, but ease of use is definitely not one of them.
    11-28-2014 12:55 AM
  8. tapehead's Avatar
    This very much depends on what you've already been exposed to. If you're used to the iOS paradigm (or even say WebOS), you might find Windows Phone a little difficult at first. But my mother still doesn't fully Android after using it for three years, jumped to Windows Phone and had it down pat in five minutes. Your argument is really theoretical.
    11-28-2014 06:01 AM
  9. MDK22's Avatar
    Actually that is mostly incorrect. Mostly ?

    iOS and Android and Windows Phone are pretty easy to set up after setting up when your apps from the Play Store they show up on your home screen, on both iOS and Android making it easier for people to reach their favourite apps. YES, apps DO show up, cluttering up your home screen. EVERY app gets pinned, thus you have to unpin some (much like you have to pin them in Windows Phone)

    On Windows Phone you no apps are automatically pinned and most people either need to learn how to pin an app or swipe right and always scroll to find it. INCORRECT - to pin an app, you long press (like a right click) & it shows up on the home screen. Your Start screen has apps on it, when you first setup.

    Not to mention the complicated mess of Windows Phone that is the settings app, and setting up lock screen notifications is also harder than Android and iOS. My answer to that, is RTFM. Android settings are somewhat complicated / sophisticated - with the added caveat of conflicting settings breaking your device. iPhone requires some digging to uncover certain settings (or RTFM, as I said before)


    So no Windows Phone isn't easier to use.

    There are other reasons why Windows Phone is good for people being introduced to smart phones, but ease of use is definitely not one of them. Small use case, but I've seen the ease of use of Windows phone. My wife likes her Windows Phone better than her (old) iPhone. My SiL (not tech savvy) had it down in a half hour.
    My reply to your silly assertions in RED (above).
    I have to question whether you've actually used a Windows Phone (or just parroting what you read)


    Let's go the other way, let's give (a typical) grandma a Samsung Galaxy S5 & let her have at it. YOU can be tech support & field all the questions, configure everything (that should be configured) remotely, over the phone. Sound like FUN ?
    Can grandma get into a bigger mess with the SGS5 or a Windows Phone (say a Lumia 830) ?
    11-28-2014 08:17 AM
  10. MDK22's Avatar
    This very much depends on what you've already been exposed to. If you're used to the iOS paradigm (or even say WebOS), you might find Windows Phone a little difficult at first. But my mother still doesn't fully Android after using it for three years, jumped to Windows Phone and had it down pat in five minutes. Your argument is really theoretical.
    Theoretical is putting it nicely, I call BS on him & very strongly agree with you.

    At a friends party, with some of her senior relatives - woman pulls out an SGS4 & starts asking rudimentary questions (how do you do this, how do you do that, etc) about it (after she found out I knew phones). My comment was '...is this NEW ? ...'. Her reply ' ... NO, I've had it for 8 months.'
    tapehead likes this.
    11-28-2014 08:20 AM
  11. thesachd's Avatar
    Unless you could logically disprove of what I've said you can't call BS. Also I have used Windows Phone devices, I haven't used Samsung devices a whole lot though but Samsung devices do have an "Easy Mode" which essentially makes it easier to use than any other OS out there.

    My point was that Windows Phone, may be easy to use, but not as easy to use as you guys make it out to be.

    What makes iOS easier than Android and Windows Phone is the fact that it is basically just a sea of icons, of which some are live and the icons arrange automatically by the time you downloaded them. Thing could get more complicated if you got into iOS widgets, but that's another story.

    Nonetheless Android works much the same way and when you set up the phone and download applications from the Play Store end up on your homescreen, so that you don't constantly have to go into the app tray. This setup is almost exactly like iOS! Thus easier to use, again if you got into widgets then it would become more complicated but Android doesn't force you to use widgets!

    Also you can disable automatic app pinning on home screen from the Play Store, but this is a very helpful feature for less tech savvy individuals.

    Windows Phone just an year ago was a terribly clustered OS, and people even then believed it was easier to use and I don't see how.

    Windows Phone basically forced you to pin live tiles to your home screen, because if you didn't good luck to receiving notification (as there was no notification centre), also you had to set up notifications for the lock screen(something you don't have to do on android or iOS) and lastly that settings app was a hell of a mess. Not to mention the Windows Phone Store which is a mess compared to the Play Store or iOS store(you can't easy Email a dev, can't easily find other apps the dev has made and the UI just ain't as intuitive).

    Since then some progress has been made, a notification centre has been added but still there is no automatic way for app pinning, you still have to set up lock screen notifications and the store still ain't as good.

    In fact the UI is so "alien" to people using Android or iOS, or even BlackBerry, that I lended my phone to a friend to text and he couldn't even figure out how to send it on his Windows Phone!(because the "send" button was located at an odd place)
    11-28-2014 10:37 AM
  12. LockOnTech's Avatar
    I disagree, because my first smartphone that set the benchmark on the phones I use today was a blackberry. Blackberry was not a particular choice as a good first smartphone, but It was adaptable; it should be Windows Phone is a good alternative to iOS, android, or blackberry.


    Sent from my iPhone 5s using Tapatalk
    11-28-2014 11:28 AM
  13. anon(9057135)'s Avatar
    That's just one of those "tags" that seem to stick.


    Same as:
    iOS is for people wanting premium devices or Android is for people who like to root and customize.

    People don't mean anything by it...it's just what they've heard from someone else who has no idea either.
    Are you a previous android owner? xD I rooted and customized my old phone all the time xD
    11-28-2014 01:27 PM
  14. anon(9057135)'s Avatar
    I don't know why... I think BlackBerry would be a good starter phone. Then iOS, Then WP, Then Android (For Advanced users or customization freaks like me)
    11-28-2014 01:28 PM
  15. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I don't know why... I think BlackBerry would be a good starter phone. Then iOS, Then WP, Then Android (For Advanced users or customization freaks like me)

    I'd think BlackBerry would be the worst choice for someone new to smartphones. Most apps don't exist in BlackBerry World store. If a user wants any of the popular apps such as Netflix it is necessary to sideload the Android versions. That's not easy for non-technologically inclined persons.
    Guytronic likes this.
    11-28-2014 01:47 PM
  16. EBUK's Avatar
    The reason people say it is that it's an interface with big, bright icons.
    My icons are smaller on WP than on Android thanks to the ability to resize them. Combined with being able to reposition the tiles, this makes WP much more customisable than Android.

    iOS and Android and Windows Phone are pretty easy to set up after setting up when your apps from the Play Store they show up on your home screen, on both iOS and Android making it easier for people to reach their favourite apps.
    Having app icons appear automatically on the homescreen can be very annoying, but fortunately Android allows you to turn this function off. I prefer WP's way NOT placing tiles on the screen.

    But of course, different people like different things... It's been said before, but it's worth repeating: use whatever works best for you.
    11-28-2014 02:35 PM
  17. MDK22's Avatar
    Unless you could logically disprove of what I've said you can't call BS. Also I have used Windows Phone devices, I haven't used Samsung devices a whole lot though but Samsung devices do have an "Easy Mode" which essentially makes it easier to use than any other OS out there.

    My point was that Windows Phone, may be easy to use, but not as easy to use as you guys make it out to be.

    What makes iOS easier than Android and Windows Phone is the fact that it is basically just a sea of icons, of which some are live and the icons arrange automatically by the time you downloaded them. Thing could get more complicated if you got into iOS widgets, but that's another story.

    Nonetheless Android works much the same way and when you set up the phone and download applications from the Play Store end up on your homescreen, so that you don't constantly have to go into the app tray. This setup is almost exactly like iOS! Thus easier to use, again if you got into widgets then it would become more complicated but Android doesn't force you to use widgets!

    Also you can disable automatic app pinning on home screen from the Play Store, but this is a very helpful feature for less tech savvy individuals.

    Windows Phone just an year ago was a terribly clustered OS, and people even then believed it was easier to use and I don't see how.

    Windows Phone basically forced you to pin live tiles to your home screen, because if you didn't good luck to receiving notification (as there was no notification centre), also you had to set up notifications for the lock screen(something you don't have to do on android or iOS) and lastly that settings app was a hell of a mess. Not to mention the Windows Phone Store which is a mess compared to the Play Store or iOS store(you can't easy Email a dev, can't easily find other apps the dev has made and the UI just ain't as intuitive).

    Since then some progress has been made, a notification centre has been added but still there is no automatic way for app pinning, you still have to set up lock screen notifications and the store still ain't as good.

    In fact the UI is so "alien" to people using Android or iOS, or even BlackBerry, that I lended my phone to a friend to text and he couldn't even figure out how to send it on his Windows Phone!(because the "send" button was located at an odd place)
    I'll let your convoluted missive speak for itself ... ' ... because the "send" button was located at an odd place ... '

    & YES, I do disapprove of what you've said.

    Bottom Line - an entry level Windows Phone is much more functional than an entry level (cheaper) Android phone, which could / would / should probably be the weapon of choice for a noob. There's NO such thing as an entry level iPhone (iPhone 5C ?), they're all relatively expensive.

    You've lost sight of the original premise - First Smartphone. SMH
    Last edited by MDK22; 11-28-2014 at 07:43 PM.
    11-28-2014 07:31 PM
  18. Guytronic's Avatar
    Are you a previous android owner? xD I rooted and customized my old phone all the time xD
    Yes...
    Rooted changed ROMs many times.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    11-28-2014 07:56 PM
  19. thesachd's Avatar

    Bottom Line - an entry level Windows Phone is much more functional than an entry level (cheaper) Android phone, which could / would / should probably be the weapon of choice for a [I]noob.
    An entry level Windows Phone is much more functional than an entry level Android phone? Lol, you really need to get off the Microsoft Kool Aid.
    11-29-2014 04:21 AM
  20. tapehead's Avatar
    An entry level Windows Phone is much more functional than an entry level Android phone? Lol, you really need to get off the Microsoft Kool Aid.
    I'll support that statement, and if you look at my track record, I am not on the Microsoft Kool Aid (aside from WP, I dislike the company, use a Macbook, and haven't used a Windows PC in years).

    If you really want to compare the HTC 8S, Nokia Lumia 520, 525, 530, 535, 620 to any Alcatel, Pantech, LG, or Sony entry level device piece of garbage be my guest. But it would be an exercise in futility, because no entry Android smart phone aside from MAYBE the Moto G even comes close to the entry level Windows Phone devices. My boyfriend has the basic Sony Xperia as did a co-worker, and they're slower than molasses.
    MDK22 likes this.
    11-29-2014 06:37 AM
  21. raphok's Avatar
    i chose because metro ui... but microsoft is killing it

    I dont know what will be my next smartphone
    11-29-2014 07:12 AM
  22. travis_valkyrie's Avatar
    i chose because metro ui... but microsoft is killing it

    I dont know what will be my next smartphone
    Same. After staying with the platform for 4 years I never thought I'd switch to another platform... well not yet anyway nor planning to, but I recently bought a blackberry z3 for the experience, and I must say this is what android should've been. Sure it's not for the first time smartphone users, but blackberry of today definitely brings out that inner techie in terms of installing leaks and sideloading apps (WP is quite straight forward, but this is a step up challenge). Still not recommended for a daily driver if you're into apps, as running android apps won't take full advantage of native functions, so you're def gonna miss out on a lot of notifications.
    LockOnTech likes this.
    11-29-2014 07:24 AM
  23. thesachd's Avatar
    I'll support that statement, and if you look at my track record, I am not on the Microsoft Kool Aid (aside from WP, I dislike the company, use a Macbook, and haven't used a Windows PC in years).

    If you really want to compare the HTC 8S, Nokia Lumia 520, 525, 530, 535, 620 to any Alcatel, Pantech, LG, or Sony entry level device piece of garbage be my guest. But it would be an exercise in futility, because no entry Android smart phone aside from MAYBE the Moto G even comes close to the entry level Windows Phone devices. My boyfriend has the basic Sony Xperia as did a co-worker, and they're slower than molasses.
    That is a completely genuine point. One reason why Windows Phones can be more easily recommended is because there are a limited number of entry level devices which ensure nearly identical software experiences.

    In Android the choice stretches much further and makes it harder to make a decision, you could get an extremely slow and complicated phone like the Samsung or Sony devices you people mention or a good quality and easy to use Moto E or G.

    And on devices like the Moto E or G, the software is just as easy to use as Windows Phone, if not significantly easier.

    But yes choice is a factor, and the limited number of low end Windows Phones definitely is a benefit for people new to smart phones.

    However as Microsoft works with more OEMs on Windows Phone, the standard will likely fall and the choice will be nearly infinite much like Android(if WP doesn't fail before that).

    Again, what MDK22(or whatever his name was) said about low end Windows Phone being more functional than low end Android devices is still untrue. But your point may we'll be logical and reasoned.
    tapehead likes this.
    11-29-2014 02:15 PM
  24. MicrosoftRulesAll's Avatar
    I see the 630 being good for a first device. But look at premium like the HTC One, or 1520... So it really depends on phone.
    11-29-2014 02:31 PM
49 12

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