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06-13-2016 03:13 PM
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  1. Indistinguishable's Avatar
    I think there would be less of a market for that device than an actual Windows phone... which is already pretty low. The best thing Microsoft could do is create an actual phone and begin marketing it with it's Surface Pro in commercials and online ads. The Surface Pro has a positive, "cool" connotation attached to it... much in the way of Apple during the 90's. That's something they can build off of.
    I don't care what the tech is, a phone has to be able to fit in my pocket, period. I already have a Surface Pro 4 in my bag... making a mini one isn't really an attractive proposition for me, and definitely will not help Microsoft to replace my Nexus phone. Now, if they come up with an innovative way to make watches, or wearables in general, more productive... I could see that being a device that could replace a phone.
    Well it sounds like you're not Microsoft's new target market. They're going for businesses and business minded people. The days of trying to appeal to the common consumer with a mobile device from Microsoft's hardware division are over.
    libra89 and aximtreo like this.
    05-31-2016 07:43 AM
  2. wpfan86's Avatar
    Well it sounds like you're not Microsoft's new target market. They're going for businesses and business minded people. The days of trying to appeal to the common consumer with a mobile device from Microsoft's hardware division are over.
    How does a mobile device that doesn't fit in your pocket appeal to ANY target market, especially enterprise users in terms of needs that aren't already met with other devices? Enterprise users are currently carrying around a phone and a laptop. How does Microsoft releasing a 7 or 8-inch device appeal to them? If it doesn't fit into their pocket, then it doesn't replace their phone, and if it doesn't replace their phone then they are still stuck carrying around two devices (their phone and their Surface mobile device). Laptops, Ultrabooks, and Tablets/2-in-ones already fill the "portable devices that are also productive but aren't a phone" need. A Surface device that fails to fit in a pocket (and therefore fails to be useful as a phone) meets no needs that the Surface and Surface Pro products don't already fulfill.
    05-31-2016 08:40 AM
  3. Johnny Tremaine's Avatar
    Hi folks...I wrote a piece last year (Nov 2015) "Will the rumored Surface Phone be a reimagined Surface Mini" where I posited how Pansy still uses his Mini as a Molesting or digital notepad. I posited that he's going to keep what's good about the Mini and put it in a form of a small Surface that sits at the lowest end of the Surface line - The Surface Book is a Laptop and Digital Clipboard, the Surface is a Tablet and Laptop and the Surface "Phone"(Which wont in my opinion be called a phone but a ultramobile PC with telephony) will function as a phone and Digital Notepad. The inking platform will really come to play here I believe. You can read a the piece here: Will Microsoft's rumored 'Surface Phone' be a re-imagined Surface Mini? | Windows Central

    I actually also talked about it in a piece I wrote in January of 2015, Is a 7" Surface phone on the horizon?
    Both Jason's comment and the hints of what Mary Jo's been hearing, I have a strong feeling that a 'Surface Phone' won't have a pocketable phone form factor. I suspect it'll be a mini tablet that also happens to make phone calls, and it won't be something that can you get from your neighborhood carrier store.
    i.e. this is going to be a very niche device, if it does see a release.
    libra89 likes this.
    05-31-2016 09:18 AM
  4. theefman's Avatar
    How does a mobile device that doesn't fit in your pocket appeal to ANY target market, especially enterprise users in terms of needs that aren't already met with other devices? Enterprise users are currently carrying around a phone and a laptop. How does Microsoft releasing a 7 or 8-inch device appeal to them? If it doesn't fit into their pocket, then it doesn't replace their phone, and if it doesn't replace their phone then they are still stuck carrying around two devices (their phone and their Surface mobile device). Laptops, Ultrabooks, and Tablets/2-in-ones already fill the "portable devices that are also productive but aren't a phone" need. A Surface device that fails to fit in a pocket (and therefore fails to be useful as a phone) meets no needs that the Surface and Surface Pro products don't already fulfill.
    Well said. A Surface Phone that isn't a phone literally means you still have to carry your phone, then whatever this magical device will be then all the paraphernalia you will need to make the magic device be something useful. Sounds like a best seller, especially since it also has the uber magical "Surface" label....
    Jeddic likes this.
    05-31-2016 09:49 AM
  5. Gregory Newman's Avatar
    A lot of people put down Windows 10 mobiles Continuum function but one great reason to have it is putting your smart phones screen on a larger screen to edit and change or add things on your smart phone with a mouse and keyboard rather than using you small *** fingers on smart phones screens. I do not play games on a smart phone because the screen is to small to me.
    an 8 inch smart phone tablet hybrid is a better device to do that on.
    Chintan Gohel likes this.
    05-31-2016 12:11 PM
  6. houkoholic's Avatar
    What people want and what they get are two different things. Here in the USA BYOD is the only way at most companies--the company figured out that this makes employees happy and keeps corporate costs lower. A thing to keep in mind is that in the USA businesses with less than 500 employees account for more than half of the jobs. These small businesses don't have the budget to supply workers with phones, and why should they bother when employees are happier using their own phones? Despite press about getting away from employment demands outside of work it is just getting worse and worse in the USA--the lowliest job now includes the expectation that you are on call via email and text 24/7.
    Small business and low paying jobs won't be the target of enterprise level solutions that MS is offering. These businesses are probably already outsourcing the majority of their IT services and relies mostly on cloud for things like email, has NO internal IT guy etc, in which case they also probably have no attachment to things like x86 apps or maybe even Windows to begin with. That battle front is not where MS wants to fight anyway, because this market is as fickle to change as the normal consumer market.

    If you start moving up the chain where actual IT has any say in the company's BYOD operation, you'll begin to see that BYOD is hardly the wild west free for all - most companies' IT will certify a couple of phones which the employee can choose from - most likely iPhones, then some top end and well understood/supported Androids like a flagship Samsung Galaxy - but they won't let you bring in some no-frills device in to ensure maximum compatibility with internal systems to reduce support headaches as well as meeting auditing requirements - I work in a medium size company and IT offers either company issued BlackBerry, or you can BYO iPhone, no Androids allowed due to security concerns. Now this is where Microsoft can make inroads and that's what they are targeting with the partnership with companies like HP. And of course, more than a few sales people WILL turn off their company phones/number after hours, not everyone just rolls over when the company tries to screw them out of their private time without paying.

    And if move away from the US, plenty of countries are shunting BYOD altogether either because of personal reasons or company policy. The world doesn't revolve around US cultures. I deal with a lot of large Japanese companies and they are still issuing flip phones for their employees for example and are still sitting out on the transition to smartphones. Large business is known to be slow to adopt new technology, so BYOD is hardly the future standard set in stone.
    Last edited by houkoholic; 06-01-2016 at 04:24 AM.
    theefman and libra89 like this.
    06-01-2016 04:14 AM
  7. Johnny Tremaine's Avatar
    Small business and low paying jobs won't be the target of enterprise level solutions that MS is offering. These businesses are probably already outsourcing the majority of their IT services and relies mostly on cloud for things like email, has NO internal IT guy etc, in which case they also probably have no attachment to things like x86 apps or maybe even Windows to begin with. That battle front is not where MS wants to fight anyway, because this market is as fickle to change as the normal consumer market.

    If you start moving up the chain where actual IT has any say in the company's BYOD operation, you'll begin to see that BYOD is hardly the wild west free for all - most companies' IT will certify a couple of phones which the employee can choose from - most likely iPhones, then some top end and well understood/supported Androids like a flagship Samsung Galaxy - but they won't let you bring in some no-frills device in to ensure maximum compatibility with internal systems to reduce support headaches as well as meeting auditing requirements - I work in a medium size company and IT offers either company issued BlackBerry, or you can BYO iPhone, no Androids allowed due to security concerns. Now this is where Microsoft can make inroads and that's what they are targeting with the partnership with companies like HP. And of course, more than a few sales people WILL turn off their company phones/number after hours, not everyone just rolls over when the company tries to screw them out of their private time without paying.
    Yup, my current position, I'm on contract and paid by the hour, so as soon as the workday is done, my work phone (I'm issued an iPhone 5S) gets turned off. Any time spent answering emails after hours, the company gets dinged as time on the clock; they're cheapskates, so it never happens.
    06-01-2016 12:38 PM
  8. Ten Four's Avatar
    Small business and low paying jobs won't be the target of enterprise level solutions that MS is offering.
    Then they are not targeting a very big market. Lots of very large enterprises are BYOD too--maybe some of the highest paid executives and salespeople get company phones, but not most employees. I know that most people at Microsoft are BYOD. My company has about 100 employees and we have a small IT department, and we are 100% BYOD.
    06-05-2016 04:50 PM
  9. Krystianpants's Avatar
    The question is, will the surface phone be able to even compete. Samsung is already planning to launch foldable tablet/phones in 2017.

    Samsung will reportedly launch devices with foldable and rollable screens in 2017 | VentureBeat | Mobile | by Evan Blass

    That is impressive. It would be great if these devices were strictly windows 10 mobile, it could also get Samsung in the enterprise world. But that's just a dream hehe.

    2 different variations.

    One that slides out.

    fold.jpg

    One that folds:

    fold2.jpg
    06-07-2016 01:26 PM
  10. cracgor's Avatar
    The question is, will the surface phone be able to even compete. Samsung is already planning to launch foldable tablet/phones in 2017.

    Samsung will reportedly launch devices with foldable and rollable screens in 2017 | VentureBeat | Mobile | by Evan Blass

    That is impressive. It would be great if these devices were strictly windows 10 mobile, it could also get Samsung in the enterprise world. But that's just a dream hehe.

    2 different variations.

    One that slides out.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    One that folds:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    There area lot of neat phones planned and demonstrations, sadly none are the surface phone. Just more wait and see.
    06-07-2016 10:00 PM
  11. Vittorio Vaselli's Avatar
    would be perfect for UWP apps...phone + tablet in the same device...

    Unfortunately i don't think it will never happen or at least not in the first surface phone.
    06-08-2016 07:51 AM
  12. ClixT's Avatar
    Define "Mini" :P

    As RumoredNow said above, it has to be pocket-able...a 9-inch "mobile" isn't.
    Unless somehow the Surface team managed to work with Samsung with their new foldable/bendable display.
    Samsung flexible foldable phone to launch in 2016 - Business Insider

    They did show a foldable screen with Windows Phone OS in it back on CES 2014 so it's plausible.
    Samsung Flexible Display Phone Coming In 2015? Manufacturer Secretly Showcases Foldable AMOLED Display At CES 2014 [VIDEO]
    06-12-2016 11:33 PM
  13. clitrenta's Avatar
    I think that marketing a device for enterprise rather than consumers is a bad idea nowadays. The days of carrying 2 phones, 1 work-issued and 1 personal, are pretty much over.

    BlackBerry hasn't had any success by concentrating on the enterprise market.
    Not for Government Workers.
    06-13-2016 03:13 PM
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