1. MP3Mike's Avatar
    I've noticed today that if I touch my Surface Book lightly next to the track pad that I can feel a slight tingling, that appears to be a grounding problem/voltage leak. It goes away if I unplug the power supply or I reverse the cord in either the wall or the power supply brick.

    It isn't polarized so it isn't a problem with it being plugged in "wrong".

    I checked and if I undock the clipboard with the base still plugged in the base still gives the tingle, and if I move the power supply connector to the clipboard then the clipboard will give the tingle. (You have to touch lightly with just one finger you can't be holding it with your other hand.)

    So my question is: has anyone else noticed this? If not I wonder if it is the power supply or the Surface Book that is a problem. (It seems from my tests that it is most likely the power supply.)
    11-12-2015 04:20 PM
  2. MP3Mike's Avatar
    I was able to test with another persons Surface Book with the same results. So whatever the issue is both of our devices have it.
    11-12-2015 04:31 PM
  3. Chuck Foltz's Avatar
    I'm not sure where you are doing this but I lightly touched around all 4 sides of the trackpad and I do not have this. Could it be a ground issue with your outlet? Try moving outlets etc.
    11-16-2015 02:46 PM
  4. zerospace-net's Avatar
    Sorry, I can't reproduce this either. My trackpad does not do this.
    11-16-2015 03:03 PM
  5. worwig's Avatar
    My Surface Pro 1 does this, as does my Surface Book.
    The power brick is two wire. No ground. Yet, they want a path to drain any static, to prevent static build up, which can damage the unit. So they put a very low current path, to the HOT and the NEUTRAL lines, both, to keep it non-polarized. So in the US, where we run 120 volts, there is close to 60 volts on the metal parts of the Surface. It is a very low current, and not a safety issue. But, if you touch the metal with a very sensitive part, like the back side of a finger, you will feel a tingle.
    It reduces the risk of damage due to static, but it can be annoying.
    11-16-2015 11:38 PM
  6. zerospace-net's Avatar
    My Surface Pro 1 does this, as does my Surface Book.
    The power brick is two wire. No ground. Yet, they want a path to drain any static, to prevent static build up, which can damage the unit. So they put a very low current path, to the HOT and the NEUTRAL lines, both, to keep it non-polarized. So in the US, where we run 120 volts, there is close to 60 volts on the metal parts of the Surface. It is a very low current, and not a safety issue. But, if you touch the metal with a very sensitive part, like the back side of a finger, you will feel a tingle.
    It reduces the risk of damage due to static, but it can be annoying.
    This sounded rather curious to me, so I did a little digging. Here's an interesting discussion on the issue in the Surface Pro units: AC electrical leakage from Surface Pro 3! - Ars Technica OpenForum

    I'm not entirely sure it's much of an "issue", though, as I still cannot feel it even while my SB is charging. Perhaps some units "leak" more current into the casing than others (it sounds like that might be the case)? Note that my SB charges off of a properly grounded rather large battery backup unit in my office.

    It does sound like MS was replacing units that were shocking people in the past with the Surface Pros, so if it's an issue for the OP, you might opt to get your device replaced.
    11-17-2015 11:16 AM
  7. anon(10719881)'s Avatar
    Same here in 2020. I notice that the 'tingle' is reduced/removed when I use both hands - one making contact with the case and the other wiped across the top of the case. Seems like poor design more than anything else. Two wire PSU are insulated so do not use the earth connection. Since power is obtained from a switch mode power supply, it is possible that the DC:DC filtering is not up to scratch, leading to a ripple on the DC output.
    "Ripple (specifically ripple voltage) in electronics is the residual periodic variation of the DC voltage within a power supply which has been derived from an alternating current (AC) source. This ripple is due to incomplete suppression of the alternating waveform after rectification."
    12-05-2020 09:46 AM

Similar Threads

  1. The Windows 10 Mobile phone update list for Orange Poland may have been leaked
    By WindowsCentral.com in forum Windows Central News Discussion & Contests
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-09-2015, 10:25 AM
  2. A list of the Xbox 360 games that will be backward compatible on the Xbox One may have leaked
    By WindowsCentral.com in forum Windows Central News Discussion & Contests
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-05-2015, 10:20 AM
  3. Lenovo's ThinkPad product roadmap gets leaked, shows new X1 Tablet due in Feb. 2016
    By WindowsCentral.com in forum Windows Central News Discussion & Contests
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-03-2015, 10:20 AM
  4. 950 XL Ringtones leak? Sounds good just the same
    By Jazmac in forum Windows Phones
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-24-2015, 11:27 PM
  5. Leaked render allegedly shows Microsoft 'Saana' phone for 2016
    By WindowsCentral.com in forum Windows Central News Discussion & Contests
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-21-2015, 03:11 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD