1. Stantowski's Avatar
    I would like to replace the existing 512gb SSD in my Surface Book with a 2TB. I am assuming that this is possible...if so, what recommendations/guidance is there on this?
    07-08-2019 11:15 AM
  2. xandros9's Avatar
    Possible, yes. Easy? No.

    https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Micr...Teardown/51972

    This is a taste of disassembling the original 2015 model and I can't imagine it becoming easier in subsequent models.
    07-08-2019 07:16 PM
  3. ochhanz's Avatar
    I would like to replace the existing 512gb SSD in my Surface Book with a 2TB. I am assuming that this is possible...if so, what recommendations/guidance is there on this?
    , I am not sure if it is soldered on or not but it would be very difficult either way. If the current ssd broke, try to claim a replacement. If not, get a fast micro sd card and use that as 2nd harddisk (/just leave it plugged in).
    07-09-2019 06:03 AM
  4. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    , I am not sure if it is soldered on or not but it would be very difficult either way. If the current ssd broke, try to claim a replacement. If not, get a fast micro sd card and use that as 2nd harddisk (/just leave it plugged in).
    My guess here is they want a larger SSD and was hoping to change it 'easily'.

    Yeah I'd be nervous opening the Surface Book up. iFixit gives it a 1/10 score for repairing that's not something I want to touch.

    Truth is no hard drive is easy to replace these days in laptops. They're all a pain, though not to the level of the Surface Book.
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 07-10-2019 at 02:25 AM.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    07-10-2019 02:14 AM
  5. ochhanz's Avatar
    Truth is no hard drive is easy to replace these days in laptops. They're all a pain, though not to the level of the Surface Book.
    , to be frank for the computer enthusiasts this is not true. With most laptops it is a matter of unscrewing ~10 screws, prying the back open with a (plastic) business card and than possibly disconnecting the battery by unplugging a cable. It is even easier for Business line, Clevo and the bulkier Acer models. (it may look hard on your 1st try but remember that you only need to do it once or twice in your laptop lifetime, and than you are really happy you have the option to do so)

    Recently I replaced a ssd for the pavillion x360 (2019 version) and it went it bit more difficult but still relatively easily; with only as extra step carefully removing rubber stripes on the back (that were blocking some screws) and repositioning them when I was done.

    While I do really love the features and design of Surface devices, I personally would never pay lots of money for them (same goes for Macbooks). Just to big of a risk that either the ssd or battery (or even memory) fails and than your devices is a brick if you are out of warranty.
    07-10-2019 05:47 AM
  6. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    , to be frank for the computer enthusiasts this is not true. With most laptops it is a matter of unscrewing ~10 screws, prying the back open with a (plastic) business card and than possibly disconnecting the battery by unplugging a cable. It is even easier for Business line, Clevo and the bulkier Acer models. (it may look hard on your 1st try but remember that you only need to do it once or twice in your laptop lifetime, and than you are really happy you have the option to do so)

    Recently I replaced a ssd for the pavillion x360 (2019 version) and it went it bit more difficult but still relatively easily; with only as extra step carefully removing rubber stripes on the back (that were blocking some screws) and repositioning them when I was done.

    While I do really love the features and design of Surface devices, I personally would never pay lots of money for them (same goes for Macbooks). Just to big of a risk that either the ssd or battery (or even memory) fails and than your devices is a brick if you are out of warranty.
    I was going by experience when I said that. I remember the days when you could just drop the HD out of the bottom. Also upgrading the RAM was a breeze. Now you have completely sealed laptops and you basically need to disassemble them to get to anything.

    I'm going to be replacing a HD in my wife's laptop. I've looked at the instructions and it's a pain.

    Regardless if you're an enthusiasts or not. Having to basically take your laptop apart to replace RAM or a HD is ridiculous. I get it if it's the keyboard, which I've done, but not basic things like this.

    As for the Surface. They're not designed to take apart and are basically throw away when done.
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 07-10-2019 at 08:39 AM.
    07-10-2019 06:01 AM
  7. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    It's going to depend on the laptop in question if the SSD/HDD is easy to swap. I've noticed more OEMs are making the bottom of the cases seem like they are sealed in. I would be somewhat nervous to upgrade anything in a modern laptop.

    As for the Surface....I wouldn't alter it unless I had nothing to lose. 14-17 steps (some steps listed on the iFixit site may not be needed) just to get to the SSD, with the risk of damaging the display just to do it. Risks outweigh the gains in my opinion.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    07-10-2019 10:39 AM
  8. ochhanz's Avatar
    It's going to depend on the laptop in question if the SSD/HDD is easy to swap. I've noticed more OEMs are making the bottom of the cases seem like they are sealed in. I would be somewhat nervous to upgrade anything in a modern laptop.

    As for the Surface....I wouldn't alter it unless I had nothing to lose. 14-17 steps (some steps listed on the iFixit site may not be needed) just to get to the SSD, with the risk of damaging the display just to do it. Risks outweigh the gains in my opinion.
    , agreed for the SB, it is not worth it if it still works.
    The thing with the bottom sealed looks tricky but it actually is not too bad just take your time when prying it open with a business card (and a screwdriver that matches the size of the screws of course). The real annoyance is soldered on parts, because that makes it practically impossible to replace parts. OEMs are already doing it with ram now, won't (probably) be long before they do the same for SSD, wifi and battery etc. Planned obsolescence :(
    07-10-2019 03:09 PM
  9. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    OEMs are already doing it with ram now, won't (probably) be long before they do the same for SSD, wifi and battery etc. Planned obsolescence :(
    Apple already is soldering the SSD in the MacBooks. I agree, I don't like it. The downside is, laptop parts are difficult to come by, so custom building your own is practically impossible.
    ochhanz likes this.
    07-11-2019 09:38 AM

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