1. valeriolucciola's Avatar
    I just purchased a surface pro but mu decision leading up to my purchase was full of misguided reviews. People would complain that its not a great tablet and its not a great laptop. Too many tradeoffs they said. But these dummies miss the whole point because they are so stuck in their labels (and probably anxious to down MS) that they won't do the surface justice.

    It isn't a laptop because laptops are big, bulky, and usually touchless. It isn't a tablet because tablets are limited-function e-readers and cell phone OSs on a larger screen.

    So why don't we put the surface pro in a category all to itself--the Ultratablet. It has the functionality of an ultrabook with the form factor of a tablet.

    Has anyone else attempted to reclassify the surface pro into a new category between a tablet and a laptop? What do you all think of calling the category Ultratablet? Got a better classification?
    09-15-2013 10:13 AM
  2. crash1989's Avatar
    Yes, it is sad to see such bad reviews, I guess it is mostly due to bad word of mouth. Someone has give it a bad review and people tend to base their opinion on something without using it. It is common, I hope you can do your bit in spreading the word on why you like it.

    Aren't these called Hybrids?
    09-15-2013 10:49 AM
  3. stephen_az's Avatar
    I just purchased a surface pro but mu decision leading up to my purchase was full of misguided reviews. People would complain that its not a great tablet and its not a great laptop. Too many tradeoffs they said. But these dummies miss the whole point because they are so stuck in their labels (and probably anxious to down MS) that they won't do the surface justice.

    It isn't a laptop because laptops are big, bulky, and usually touchless. It isn't a tablet because tablets are limited-function e-readers and cell phone OSs on a larger screen.

    So why don't we put the surface pro in a category all to itself--the Ultratablet. It has the functionality of an ultrabook with the form factor of a tablet.

    Has anyone else attempted to reclassify the surface pro into a new category between a tablet and a laptop? What do you all think of calling the category Ultratablet? Got a better classification?
    Does Microsoft sell it with a keyboard or do you have to buy one separately? All of these comments always ignore the fact it is sold by Microsoft specifically as a tablet. Until that changes, it is only a convertible or hybrid or whatever people want to invent as a label if you buy a (not cheap) accessory; therefore claiming it as one is very dubious. If you go into a restaurant, and order a BLT, would you expect that including the bacon will cost extra? It is a very nice device that is more powerful than the average laptop; gets reasonable battery life with a few power plan adjustments; and certainly can have added convenience\utility due to form factor. Nevertheless, it is sold as a tablet and that is how it should be classified. To reinvent reality, from my perspective, is something I mostly expect from BlackBerry users. BTW, yes I do own a Surface Pro....
    09-15-2013 11:04 AM
  4. stephen_az's Avatar
    Until/unless they sell It with a keyboard cover as the standard configuration (at no extra charge) it is not a hybrid. That is the equivalent of saying it is a sub-meter accuracy GPS unit because you can buy a Bluetooth or USB GPS device that will work with it.
    09-15-2013 11:09 AM
  5. dstrauss's Avatar
    I have to agree with stephen_az (and I'm a confirmed Surface Pro zealot from release day) - it is a tablet as long as the keyboard, which is also its screen cover, is an extra cost item. Otherwise, is the iPad a limited ultraportable because you can buy a Logitech, Zagg, or Belkin keyboard/cover?
    09-16-2013 09:03 AM
  6. valeriolucciola's Avatar
    I agree that it is, in fact, a tablet, but I believe this type of tablet deserves its own sub-classification. For example, a "tablet PC" (i.e., turn of the century tablet running a full PC OS but using mostly pen input and not touch centered) is different from an "e-Reader" (i.e., tablet initially made with the primary purpose of consuming literature). Both are different from the modern "tablet" (i.e., tablet with a limited OS distinctly different from laptop and desktop counterparts) like the iPad, Nexus 7, and Surface RT. All of which are different from the Surface Pro and other tablets running full windows 8.

    By calling it a "tablet" we leave it up to the nave consumer to define it with the terms they have on hand. The logical conclusion is reviewers must say it is more than a "tablet" (today "tablet" is to iPad as "PC" is to windows desktop) but less than an laptop or ultrabook with the additional caveat that it is also not a "hybrid" because it doesn't come with a keyboard. So it is more often defined as what it is not rather than what it is. Comparisons put it squarely in between tablets and ultrabooks and hybrids because it looks like a tablet but runs like an ultrabook.

    It also encourages people to confuse the Surface Pro with the Surface RT because they are both tablets. But the RT is closer to an iPad so it is appropriately called a "tablet" but the Surface Pro and other tablets that run full w8? It is funny to listen to people try to explain the differences to people who don't keep up with this stuff. Reminds me of the motorcycles(?) with three wheels. Are they "motorcycles" or "tricycles" or does it matter if they have two wheels on the front or back or if there is a motor or only two wheels...

    So I think with any new type of product people must have a definition or category that can aid understanding. The surface pro is mostly a revolutionized "tablet PC" but why not identify a new class of touch-centered tablets that also function like a full computer so that consumers and salespeople can have a clear way of distinguishing these new machines from those of the past and present day? I think it could only help.
    09-18-2013 08:16 AM
  7. fatclue_98's Avatar
    History is on the side of the OP for wanting to call it a hybrid. The HP TC1000 & TC1100 series from the early 00's were considered hybrids because of the detachable keyboard. A non-removable keyboard made this device type a "convertible" such as the later TX1000 and the IBM/Lenovo X61 series.
    09-18-2013 02:45 PM
  8. Connert's Avatar
    I tend to agree with the op that the pro should be looked at in a different class. I think an included keyboard is not as important as the type of OS the device is running. I tell people the RT is competition for the ipad and Android tablets and the Pro really doesn't have any competition. It really is in a class of it's own. As a systems/network admin that travels over 100 miles a day between sites, it has easily replaced my laptop as my "take with me" device. Laptop stays home now and is my primary work device when working from home. The Surface Pro travels everywhere with me, from the soccer fields on the weekends, training days out of town and vacations as well.

    Surface Pro is truly in a class all by itself, no matter how you label it.

    Sent from my SPH-L900 using WPCentral Forums mobile app
    09-28-2013 08:24 PM
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