1. shamrockhead's Avatar
    So I've downloaded this (with thanks for link to maflynn)

    https://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det...24075&lang=eng

    I ran the graphics stress test and my CPU was running at 90 degrees C! This bit of equipment is going to be frazzled in no time, unless somebody can tell me of a Microsoft fix apart from the updates already posted by Microsoft.......
    02-11-2015 06:56 PM
  2. jojoe42's Avatar
    So I've downloaded this (with thanks for link to maflynn)

    https://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det...24075&lang=eng

    I ran the graphics stress test and my CPU was running at 90 degrees C! This bit of equipment is going to be frazzled in no time, unless somebody can tell me of a Microsoft fix apart from the updates already posted by Microsoft.......
    This is what I read from the Intel site: "Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility (Intel® XTU) is a simple Windows*-based performance tuning software for novice and experienced enthusiasts to overclock, monitor, and stress a system. The software interface exposes a set of robust capabilities common in most enthusiast platforms along with special new features available on new Intel® Processors and Intel® Motherboards."

    So of course if you're going to stress test a system, it will put it under a large workload and thus won't it always generate a lot of heat? My desktop, which is well-ventilated and has several fans in it still gets super hot when I run stress-tests. Which is why I tend to avoid them. Of course, a tablet that is almost as thin as an iPad except with an x64 processor and a small fan in it made of metal (which conducts heat) is going to get warm! If my desktop gets to 70 degrees, 90 degrees for a small tablet seems reasonable. Unless you plan on trying to play Crysis on the SP3 for several hours, or want to keep running stress tests (not recommended for ANY computer), most users won't break their Surfaces from overheating it too often :P
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    02-12-2015 12:16 AM
  3. NATOuk's Avatar
    It's actually impressive it only gets to 90C.

    When I built my gaming PC, I ran the same benchmark on my Core i7 4770k before my aftermarket CPU cooler arrived and it almost instantly hit 100C and the CPU started throttling its clockspeed to keep the temperature below the 100C threshold. Even now with a MASSIVE heatsink my 4770k hits about 65-70C under stress-test scenarios

    I wouldn't be worried at all about your results, it's only under unusual loads you'll see that sort of temperature, even gaming wouldn't put it under that much stress as that utility does.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    02-13-2015 02:45 AM
  4. Darth_Bane's Avatar
    90c is pretty hot, If the chipset senses it getting too hot, it throttles itself and then shuts itself down.

    I find, that I run in the high 50 to 60c range, though if I view a video, the temps spike up a bit. I hadn't noticed anything near 90c for normal type work.
    02-13-2015 09:12 AM
  5. CliveSinclair's Avatar
    It's designed for those temperatures. Add in a safety margin (around 10%) and you will have nothing to worry about. Throttling is the safe way to protect the CPU. You can't have powerful computers without heat - that is a fact.

    Unlike a desktop, you don't have space for huge fans or watercooling - so throttling it is in a form factor such as the ~SP3.
    02-13-2015 03:30 PM

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 02-13-2015, 01:21 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2015, 05:53 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2015, 05:36 PM
  4. Get another Nokia 1520 or wait for newer phone?
    By WPCentral Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2015, 04:45 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD