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  1. boscoosco's Avatar
    Are people all done with this thread, is there some solution I missed?
    I tried, but I failed. http://forums.windowscentral.com/nok...tm#post2490025

    If you do what I did, you can charge fine without opening the phone. However I could not get those 3 wires to stay on the phone in a way where the connection was stable. I thought about buying the case and modifying it, but as you can tell from the pictures, I'm terrible at these kinds of projects and making them nice.

    I was hoping a different solution would come to light. I don't own this phone so I cannot take it apart :( It's not worth getting fired over. If you find a way to mod the case I'll gladly send you a paypal donation for pictures/instructions :)
    05-12-2014 10:43 AM
  2. Lenn0x12's Avatar
    Has anyone tried this solution with the ATT lumia 1520?

    Universal QI Wireless Charging Receiver

    I figured the receiver can be hidden behind a case.
    05-13-2014 02:58 PM
  3. Dono Newcomb's Avatar
    Has anyone tried this solution with the ATT lumia 1520?

    Universal QI Wireless Charging Receiver

    That looks like it is worth a try, but it looks like it might be a bit inconvenient if it would occupy the slot all the time.

    I figured the receiver can be hidden behind a case.
    05-15-2014 09:30 AM
  4. Dono Newcomb's Avatar
    I tried, but I failed. http://forums.windowscentral.com/nok...tm#post2490025

    If you do what I did, you can charge fine without opening the phone. However I could not get those 3 wires to stay on the phone in a way where the connection was stable. I thought about buying the case and modifying it, but as you can tell from the pictures, I'm terrible at these kinds of projects and making them nice.

    I was hoping a different solution would come to light. I don't own this phone so I cannot take it apart :( It's not worth getting fired over. If you find a way to mod the case I'll gladly send you a paypal donation for pictures/instructions :)
    Its hard to say without buying the incipio case and seeing how they made the connection solid. I would imagine that they use a small board holding three pins and then backed that with a firm spongy cushion of some kind to keep constant pressure against the pin plate while the cover is on (I have seen similar setups on internals on laptops that use pressure connections). If that is the case then you would need to duplicate similar conditions by either re-using the incipio cover or by using a cover that has a rigid shell maybe like this:
    Black Rubber Hybrid Kickstand Cover Hard Case for Nokia Lumia 1520 | eBay
    05-15-2014 09:49 AM
  5. myrandex's Avatar
    Has anyone tried this solution with the ATT lumia 1520?

    Universal QI Wireless Charging Receiver

    I figured the receiver can be hidden behind a case.
    Thought about it, but I have heard negative reactions. Sonartech post something about many times the electronics used in those would be quite cheap and I have heard users complaining about issues with them such as slow charging and over heating. I think what was said is many times the wrong voltage might be fed to the phone. I didn't want to deal with the hassle.

    I have located someone local that has a good soldering setup and a magnification area and he and I will tackle this project one of these days.
    05-15-2014 04:29 PM
  6. Valkyrie-MT's Avatar
    So I just bought all the stuff to do the solartech mod to add Qi charging. I have the coil and charger pad right now and I was thinking. The most intimidating piece of the procedure is the exposing of the contacts on the PMA ribbon. Then I received the inductive coil part and I placed on my charger bare and sure enough it puts out 7V. More than the 5V I would have expected, but I'm sure the phone has some voltage regulator to knock that down to 5V. Then I read in the procedure "AVOID LONG WIRES" but why? At the point of connection, it's just voltage on the line. I don't see why length matters. So, then it dawned on me, well, if length doesn't matter, I can rotate the coil and just connect the contacts that are exposed on the outside but on the edge, inside the phone. And, this is essentially the exact same configuration you would have if you used a snap-on Qi cover. When I get all my kapton tape and torx drivers, I will be doing it this way. Seems like it's easier and lower risk this way.

    One question for those in the know. Shouldn't the external contacts be blocked with tape or something? Connecting another cover with this inside, I would think, would be bad.
    05-24-2014 04:50 PM
  7. Peter Savas's Avatar
    Everyone,

    There is a guy in Spain selling the Qi wireless battery cover for the 1520 for between $60-65 plus shipping. His eBay store is here:

    items in Original Parts Mobile store on eBay!

    He has the current color palette to choose from: black, white, red, yellow, and has told me you should just be able to remove the current battery cover and replace it with one of these to get Qi charging.

    pete
    05-29-2014 04:39 AM
  8. MDK22's Avatar
    Everyone,

    There is a guy in Spain selling the Qi wireless battery cover for the 1520 for between $60-65 plus shipping. His eBay store is here:

    items in Original Parts Mobile store on eBay!

    He has the current color palette to choose from: black, white, red, yellow, and has told me you should just be able to remove the current battery cover and replace it with one of these to get Qi charging.

    pete
    In a way that makes sense, in the exploded view of the AT&T Lumia 1520 (with the pins on the back, I assume for contact with addon charging case), there is NO connection to subvert / disconnect to remove the case from the innards of the phone. Begs the question, how does the power (obtained from the case) get to the battery. There must be some sort of contact (in the case) or it's (hmmm) induction. Don't know this for sure, what is certain, is ...

    viewing the video for taking the Lumia 1520 apart - there is NO connection to disconnect when removing the Lumia 1520 case !
    05-29-2014 08:56 PM
  9. Citizen X's Avatar
    Everyone,

    There is a guy in Spain selling the Qi wireless battery cover for the 1520 for between $60-65 plus shipping. His eBay store is here:

    items in Original Parts Mobile store on eBay!

    He has the current color palette to choose from: black, white, red, yellow, and has told me you should just be able to remove the current battery cover and replace it with one of these to get Qi charging.

    pete

    He lied to you
    . Read the thread. This has been discussed ad nauseam. First post of the thread suggests this "solution." Frankly I wish a separate Sonartech with the real solution was started instead of intermingling it with this fantasy.

    In a way that makes sense, in the exploded view of the AT&T Lumia 1520 (with the pins on the back, I assume for contact with addon charging case), there is NO connection to subvert / disconnect to remove the case from the innards of the phone. Begs the question, how does the power (obtained from the case) get to the battery. There must be some sort of contact (in the case) or it's (hmmm) induction. Don't know this for sure, what is certain, is ...

    viewing the video for taking the Lumia 1520 apart - there is NO connection to disconnect when removing the Lumia 1520 case !
    Read the thread. This has all been explained. You can't just mate the Qi cover to a PMA phone. The Qi cover is missing a bunch of circuitry. It's a totally different setup. Someone already explained how to make use of the Qi cover. It's more expensive and the upside is somewhat unproven.
    kennsg likes this.
    05-29-2014 11:45 PM
  10. oditius's Avatar
    This is sure a lot to do (not to mention voiding the warranty) to get Qi charging on the phone. Seems just easier to just pop on the case (Most will buy one anyway) and then just place it on the charger. So you had 10 Qi chargers laying around, now you have 10 cup mats laying around. I had Qi charging on the 920 with 2 mats, sold the 920 and included the mats too. When I bought the 1520, I just bought the case off ebay for $40 and it came with a PMA mat. Plus there was this guy selling a iPhone3 PMA case and mat for $5. Bought a couple of those, tossed the case and used the mat at work if needed. But with the 1520's huge battery, I never needed it.
    05-30-2014 04:56 AM
  11. joelcottrell's Avatar
    Seeing as though the Lumia 1520.3 offers Qi charging, does anyone know of a supplier of replacement parts for this model? I assume that if we can get the back cover part for this model, it would be easy to place it on the original 1520 (AT&T branded)?
    05-30-2014 02:08 PM
  12. Citizen X's Avatar
    Seems just easier to just pop on the case (Most will buy one anyway) and then just place it on the charger.
    Well the case is the problem. I personally would have gotten the case and called it a day but the case provides absolutely no protection to the front of the phone. So it makes the phone bulky, destroys the design aesthetic, and doesn't provide protection. I am not going to risk a $200 screen repair just for wireless charging. Honestly even if you butcher the Qi hack at worst you lose your PMA cable. It's not like your phone will stop working.

    I haven't gotten the guts to do the Qi hack but I really am leaning in that direction at this stage. After at&t's fire sale on Qi chargers I literally picked up eight of those things for $30. With at&t's new plans I may just ride this 1520 till it dies and use my Qi chargers for years.

    Seeing as though the Lumia 1520.3 offers Qi charging, does anyone know of a supplier of replacement parts for this model? I assume that if we can get the back cover part for this model, it would be easy to place it on the original 1520 (AT&T branded)?

    I don't know how many times this has to be said READ THE THREAD. THIS WILL NOT WORK.
    05-31-2014 08:40 PM
  13. GrayW0lf's Avatar
    Seeing as though the Lumia 1520.3 offers Qi charging, does anyone know of a supplier of replacement parts for this model? I assume that if we can get the back cover part for this model, it would be easy to place it on the original 1520 (AT&T branded)?
    The problem with the replacement shells for the 1520.3 is this: Although the Qi coil is included on the shell, the circuitry to make it work with the AT&T 1520 is not. Therefore, your only choice is to hack the phone using Sonartech's instructions if you have an AT&T model 1520.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    06-02-2014 01:06 PM
  14. RAP66's Avatar
    I recently picked up a 1520 as a work phone, and will be doing this mod soon as I get the Qi charger. Thanks to everyone here for this information!

    -Rich

    -edit- Very easy mod to do... the hardest part was getting the solder to stick to the trace.
    Last edited by RAP66; 06-04-2014 at 05:01 PM.
    06-02-2014 01:20 PM
  15. Sonartech's Avatar
    I have some additional information for those people that attempted this modification and failed because they measured a short across positive and negative terminals once they soldered the wires to the PMA flex.

    Some background: Many people were sending me PM's asking why their flex would short-out after they soldered the wires on, and several people even included pictures (thanks!). Many people also reported that the Flex "started working fine" after they removed their modification from the PMA flex. After farting around with this for a couple of weeks and dissecting yet ANOTHER flex, I found the problem. Nokia's apparently using two different kinds or revisions of PMA flexes: One with black masking only, and one with a black masking over a thin, dark gray conductive shielding layer. If you don't clean the black paint mask and dark grey conductive layer completely off the area around where you exposed the copper trace, your wire may short out to the conductive paint, which is electrically connected to ground elsewhere on the flex. This can cause your positive connection to short to ground.

    The solution is to remove the black paint mask and dark gray conductive layer away from the areas where you dig into the flex to expose the copper. You can either carefully do this by scraping, or you can use a chemical solution and lots of Q-tips to solve it away.

    I personally hate scraping, because there's no way to "unscrape" once you go too far, so I looked for a solvent that would work on this mask. I did some tests, and here are the results:

    flexsolvents.jpg

    Ewww... MEK... Wonderful stuff... Causes cancer, clears up acne, and really flushes the senses... Makes you feel like you're alive and kicking... or not... Breathe these fumes at your own peril.

    I recommend that once you scrape down to the copper substrate that you clean/scrape the black/conductive mask away from that area completely to prevent the exposed wire(s) from shorting-out to the gray conductive coating. The orange mylar mask is not conductive, but the gray crud is VERY tenacious and may be hard to see without a scope, so be thorough! It really likes to stay in the gap between traces, so carefully check the gap between (T-) and (+). If you look closely in the full-size image above, you can still see gray conductive material in the gaps between the traces, even on the side I used MEK to clean...

    Once you clear the black mask and conductive layer away from the area you dug into, solder your connections and test for any shorts. If your exposed wire connection doesn't touch any of the gray material, you're probably good-to-go. If you see your solder work or exposed wire touching ANY gray coating, clean it away before finishing up.

    Don't forget to test your modifications for shorts between (+) and (-), and (+) and (T-). Remember that (-) and (T-) should only be shorted after you solder a connection between the two on the flex.

    Good luck!

    SonarTech
    Last edited by Sonartech; 06-21-2014 at 01:51 AM. Reason: Clarification... Enhancement...
    06-20-2014 06:21 PM
  16. NoRomBasic's Avatar
    I have some additional information for those people that attempted this modification and failed because they measured a short across positive and negative terminals once they soldered the wires to the PMA flex.

    SonarTech
    Nice sleuthing there. I could see it having been a big part of the headaches I ran into when doing my mod and while my "ugly" mod has actually worked flawlessly for me, this is good info for those that will follow...
    06-20-2014 06:43 PM
  17. kennsg's Avatar
    Read all the way though these post..wow alot of help here. Outstanding Forum for sure..thanks to all that gave input on this.
    07-06-2014 06:38 PM
  18. swootton's Avatar
    Thanks SonarTech for the great write ups. After you posted the step by step instructions for opening the case I decided I could handle this. I now have the "Unicorn" 1520. Works great on the speaker dock I bought from ATT for my 920.
    07-20-2014 04:06 PM
  19. pararigger's Avatar
    I for the life of me can't get any solder to stick to the flex cable. I've been using flux, have the iron plenty hot enough and pre tin the wire and still nothing sticks. WTH! Any tips would be appreciated.
    09-02-2014 06:17 AM
  20. Meltdown0's Avatar
    Sonartech's mod works great. Just finished mine today.
    img_5558-2-.jpg

    I used 26ga, enameled motor/magnet winding wire to eliminate some bulk.
    Also, there is actually (3) three layers to scrape away on the PMA flex. (1) Black mylar mask (2) silver ground layer (3) dark orange polyamide layer! (I originally mistook that for the copper, but it is darker and solder doesn't stick to it!)

    img_5559-large-.jpg
    Sonartech likes this.
    09-09-2014 01:12 PM
  21. Meltdown0's Avatar
    I for the life of me can't get any solder to stick to the flex cable. I've been using flux, have the iron plenty hot enough and pre tin the wire and still nothing sticks. WTH! Any tips would be appreciated.
    There are (3) layers to scrape away:
    The last is the dark orange polyamide layer. When you get to copper you will know it! The color will match the contacts at the top of the PMA flex.
    Also, solvents won't remove the polyamide layer. You have to scratch to remove it.
    Last edited by Meltdown0; 09-09-2014 at 04:57 PM.
    pararigger likes this.
    09-09-2014 01:15 PM
  22. pararigger's Avatar
    There are (3) layers to scrape away:
    The last is the dark orange polyamide layer. When you get to copper you will know it! The color will match the contacts at the top of the PMA flex.
    Also, solvents won't remove the polyamide layer. You have to scratch to remove it.

    Awesome! Thank you very much, I'll check it out this weekend and hopefully get it finished.
    09-10-2014 05:32 AM
  23. Sonartech's Avatar
    Hi, Folks.

    After building these modifications for several months, I wanted to update the procedure one final time to encompass all of the lessons I've learned into a single post, partly because this thread's hideously long, and partly because I'm tired of lazy people contacting me and asking me to do their reading for them, or provide them "with a quick summary of what needs to be done." (Who knew reading was so difficult!)

    To start off, I should point out some facts that I'm aware of:

    • AT&T does not sell a Lumia 1520 with the Qi Wireless Charging Capability
    • AT&T variants have three gold dots on the back case for connecting to the PMA Charging Sleeve
    • AT&T Lumia 1520's do NOT have Qi-capable electronics built in, and you cannot use an International Lumia 1520 case to add this capability
    • International Lumia 1520 cases ONLY provide a Qi-compatible antenna, not the associated electronics to use the antenna
    • AT&T Lumia 1520's are built to support a PMA-compatible charging sleeve only, but can be hacked to add Qi Wireless Charging by installing a self-contained Qi Receiver

    Now that that's out of the way, let's start. I'm not going to cover details like how you open your 1520 or how you solder --there's plenty of information on this already available. I want to focus on the modification itself, and the lessons I've learned over the last 9 months building these modifications. After having used this modification successfully for 9+ months, I know how well it works and how reliable it is. I also know what a pain in the arse it is to build, and for that, I'm sorry. It is what it is. You will need a Microscope to prepare the flex, or some kind of stable, clear magnification. You will need a very fine-pitch soldering iron and some relatively decent soldering skills to make this work. You will also need to be anal-retentive and meticulous about preparing the flex, or you'll miss something and probably cause a short. Even on a good day, it takes me 1 hour to prepare this modification, and I've had LOTS of practice...

    Parts required:

    1. AT&T Lumia 1520
    2. Self-contained Qi Wireless Charging Coil, I recommend the Lumia 920 coil (Nokia Lumia 920 Wireless Charging Coil)
    3. 2mm or smaller soldering iron
    4. Liquid Soldering Flux
    5. Kapton Tape 1/2" wide (or other polyamide insulating tape)
    6. Non-foam, double-sided tape
    7. Bus wire, solid core, 24 to 26 AWG
    8. Super-fine X-Acto Knife, new condition
    9. Digital Multi-meter
    10. Working Qi Charger (for testing)
    11. Goop-Off (the nasty stuff that comes in a metal can, not that kid-friendly crap used for removing crayons)
    12. Lots of fresh Q-Tips... with cardboard sticks, NOT PLASTIC ONES! (You're dipping them in Goop-Off... Have you seen what Goop-Off does to plastic?)

    Disclaimer
    This is a hardware hack (duh!) and as such, it WILL void your warranty. You risk irreparably damaging your Lumia 1520. If you attempt to do this work, you do so entirely at your own risk, with only yourself to blame if things go bad. It is up to you to verify the validity of these instructions prior to permanently installing this modification into your device. Make sure you have the skills necessary before attempting this modification. READ THIS ENTIRE PROCEDURE FROM START-TO-FINISH BEFORE STARTING YOUR WORK!!

    Step 1: This procedure assumes you're using the PMA flex already installed in your 1520. If you have the fortune to find a new, unused PMA flex, move to Step 3. Open your 1520 by removing the SIM Tray, uSD tray, white bar-code label, and T2 Torx screw hiding underneath. Pop the cover off the display from the top sides, working your way down to the bottom sides. Once the top and sides are free of the cover, gently lift the bottom out of the cover. If you need more details on this, do a search. ;-)

    Step 2: Remove the PMA Flex from the back case of the phone. Use that fancy T2 Torx driver you used to remove the side screw to press the center gold dot on the back case. Press hard enough to pop the sleeve conductor PCB off the back of the case, then gently lift the PMA flex towards the top of the phone. Gently and slowly peel the flex away from the top anchor where the 3 gold square contacts are located to free the flex. It should be completely free of the case now. Set the flex aside and take great care to ensure you don't contaminate the adhesive tape on the top or the bottom of the flex - that includes finger prints, cat hair, hot pocket crumbs or boogers.

    Step 3: Remove the 2 black rubber spacers adhered to the inside of the case. Peel them away slowly to avoid shedding adhesive. These will not be used going forward, so decide if you want to save them or not. They work great to prevent elbow chafing.

    Step 4: Prepare the Flex. This is one of the two hardest parts of this modification, and this step takes the most time and patience. You want to chemically solve away as much of the black paint and conductive shielding as possible, down to the mylar / orange polyamide insulator. Here's a picture of what you're trying to do for reference:

    1.jpg

    The idea here is that you use solvent (Goop-Off), friction and time to gently wear-away the layers of the flex, in the area shown, gently and slowly to avoid damaging the flex. Sure, you could scrape it, but if you dig into the flex accidentally, it's not easy to repair it - and you've only got one flex, so do it right and be patient! (Side note: I'm experimenting with using a fiberglass scratch brush to speed up this process; I may post more on that later if it turns out to be helpful.)

    Saturate a Q-Tip with Goop-Off. Using the picture above as a guide for where you need to clean, start rubbing the Q-Tip on the flex while holding the flex firmly to a solvent-proof table. Make sure the Q-Tip stays moist with solvent. After a few minutes, that side of the Q-Tip will start to turn black, indicating you're getting into the black paint. Keep cleaning. Eventually the black turns into gray conductive paint, and this paint is considerably tougher than the black paint. If you decide to scrape away at the paint or gray coating, do so with something that won't cut or dig into the orange insulating layer under the gray shield coating - like a dull X-Acto blade... All I can tell you is to be patient - it takes 20 to 30 minutes to get this clean as shown in the picture.

    Here's the catch... That gray coating is electrically connected to NEGATIVE, and it has a very nasty habit of staying hidden in between the traces. You must get it out of the way of your soldered connections, or else you'll short the flex. Use the fine point on the X-Acto to carefully scrape it out of those grooves - without damaging the orange insulating layer. Once your flex looks like that picture, move to the next step.

    Step 5: Identify the flex traces and solder points. Here's your picture:

    1-annote.jpg

    This picture identifies the signals on the flex that you care about. You have NEGATIVE, SLEEVE_DET, and POSITIVE. All of these traces will be used.

    Next, mark the zones that will be cut away on the traces to expose the copper underneath. Use this picture as a guide:

    2.jpg

    The black marks are the areas that need to be exposed. To do that, you need to very carefully use your new X-Acto knife blade to very gently scrape-off the orange insulating layer to expose the copper underneath. Press too hard and you'll cut into the flex, potentially destroying it... Go too fast, and you'll cut more than you wanted to placing you at risk of a short... This is what your flex should look like when you're done:

    3.jpg

    In the picture, you can clearly see 4 exposed areas that show copper. The one on the far right was a "freebie" that came as a result of cleaning the paint & conductive mask away. You won't use the far right trace - you only care about the first three traces. Also note that the SLEEVE_DET trace (#2 from the left; the thin trace) was carefully exposed while the traces on either side of it where not touched - this is very important! If you short SLEEVE_DET to positive, you may permanently damage your charge circuit (i.e., the phone won't charge via USB or Qi!!)

    Step 6: Add double-sided tape to the orange side of the flex as shown below, but do not peel-off the backing yet. This is to adhere the flex to the 920 Qi charging module:

    dstape.jpg

    Step 7: Tin the PMA Flex traces. Add solder flux to the 3 exposed traces, and tin the areas with solder. Do not exceed 750F or you'll risk delaminating the flex. Also watch your dwell time; try and get done in 4 seconds or less (with each trace). I generally solder at 710F with a .5mm tip. Once done, your trace should look something like this:

    4.jpg

    Step 8: Solder PMA Bus wire jumpers. Using the picture below as a guide, cut & strip bus wires to make the connections to the 920 Qi charging coil. Clean off the flux once finished:

    5.jpg

    The picture shows where the wires are eventually going to be soldered to. The Blue wire is SLEEVE_DET, and will connect to P2:WC_DET on the 920 Qi Charging Coil. The Red wire is POSITIVE, and will connect to P3:VCharIN. The Black wire is NEGATIVE, and will connect to P4:GND. Note how the wire positions correspond to the plates on the 920 Qi Charging Coil. That was no accident...

    Step 9: Position and adhere the 920 Qi Coil to the PMA flex cable. Peel the backing off the double-stick tape, and position the PMA flex dead-center on the WHITE side of the 920 Qi Coil, gold-contacts facing up:

    flexposition.jpg

    Gently press and firmly adhere the flex to the coil.

    Step 10: Solder the 3 wires to the associated Qi Coil Pads. Using the picture below as a guide, use those fantastic soldering skills of yours to complete the circuit as shown below. Make sure you clean off all flux debris once finished:

    6.jpg

    Watch out for the gold plates on the 920 Coil - they themselves are soldered to the PCB, and when you heat them, they'll float away if you're not holding them in place... You can see how my positive plate turned clockwise a few degrees when I soldered it... If they do come off and piѕѕ you off, just solder directly to the PCB. The gold plates are non-essential.

    Step 11: Test the modification (for shorts and proper operation). Using a DMM set to continuity, measure for shorts between +, - and SLEEVE_DET. There should be no shorts to any of these circuits. SLEEVE_DET should NOT be shorted to NEGATIVE; I used to do that in my old mods, but found that it caused certain phones to get stuck in a "charging mode" even when removed form the Qi charger. Using SLEEVE_DET with WC_DET fixes this problem (but requires one more wire to solder). It also enables faster charging, since the impedance on the Negative circuit is now considerably less having been isolated. I think it also results in the charging coil running cooler, but I can't really back that up with quantifiable data...

    Once you verify that there are no shorts, place the coil on your Qi charger and verify that it generates +7VDC between + and -. Also verify that you see +7V between + and SLEEVE_DET. If you do, then you're ready to move on to step 12. If you don't, check your wiring and assembly steps.

    Step 12: Insulation and cleaning. Once the soldering's verified and the device is functionally tested, you're ready to insulate those thin, high-quality, low-profile solder joints you created. You DID make them low-profile, DIDN'T YOU?! I hope so... Using a 1/2" piece of Kapton tape, wrap the work site as shown below:

    7.jpg

    Oooo, fancy. Now use a Q-Tip dipped into 99% Isopropyl alcohol to clean off your hot-pocket-greased diϲk-skinner prints, then clean the three Square Gold Contacts off. Make sure they shine and do not touch them again... finger oil on these contacts is BAD, BAD, BAD.

    Step 13: Final check and installation. Does your flex look like this?

    finished.jpg

    If so, you're ready to install it. Peel the backing off the adhesive tape on the top of the flex (if present), the Qi coil, and the bottom of the flex (if present). Re-install the BOTTOM PMA BUTTON PCB FIRST (this is important!). Press it very firmly to ensure that 3 gold dots are pushed back into their holes. Now, align the top of the flex back into the locking pin, and gently scoot the Qi coil into position, allowing it to plant in the center of the case. Everything should be flat once re-installed. If you touch the top 3 gold contact squares while pressing the double-stick tape back down, just clean it up again with a Q-Tip and alcohol. Once you're done, re-assemble the case onto the phone electronics. Remember to insert the BOTTOM part of the phone into the case before snapping the rest of the phone hardware back into the case. Test the mod before you replace the T2 Torx screw and sticker. Make sure the charging indicator turns off a few seconds after removing the 1520 from the charger (~5 seconds or less, typically). After everything checks out, turn off the 1520 and insert your SIM and uSD card (if you have one).

    That's it. I hope the pictures help. Congratulations if you were brave enough to try this modification and actually succeeded!! You have earned a new badge:

    qi_inside.jpg

    SonarTech
    Last edited by Sonartech; 09-12-2014 at 06:06 PM.
    09-11-2014 04:08 AM
  24. Meltdown0's Avatar
    I went to a Microsoft store in Orlando this past weekend and freaked out the staff when my AT&T 1520 started charging on the Qi charger they had. Priceless!
    Now if we can just find a supplier for the PMA cable, so if any of us breaks our phone we can swap out cable and be back to OEM...
    Sonartech and joeonsunset like this.
    09-19-2014 05:10 PM
  25. DrFistington's Avatar
    Thanks so much for all your working figuring out this hack. I Finally sat down yesterday and did this project, it only took about an hour and with my previous experience working on electronics/pinball machines/circuit boards I found that it was overall pretty easy, at least once I was able to scavenge some really small (28-30ga) wire from my shelf of spare parts. I managed to get everything thrown together, tested for the right voltage readings on my multimeter, and then reassembled. Worked the first time without any problems!
    09-24-2014 08:12 AM
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