1. ike2000's Avatar
    Have YOU been battling AT&T and other monopolies for the right to UNLOCK your PAID-IN-FULL NOKIA LUMIA 1520? Well, that battle is set to be over. Read: ?House passes bill that legalizes phone unlocking, with a frustrating caveat
    "​House passes bill that legalizes phone unlocking, with a frustrating caveat."

    Well that spells it OUT. If you purchased a 1520, IN-FULL, you therefore, posses the inalienable right to have AT&T take the shackles off your property - by providing you the UNLOCK Code.
    Alienhead95 and oditius like this.
    02-27-2014 10:04 AM
  2. micallan_17's Avatar
    Thanks for the Heads up :)
    02-27-2014 10:08 AM
  3. Alienhead95's Avatar
    Thank you OP
    02-27-2014 10:25 AM
  4. palandri's Avatar
    Have YOU been battling AT&T and other monopolies for the right to UNLOCK your PAID-IN-FULL NOKIA LUMIA 1520? Well, that battle is set to be over. Read: ?House passes bill that legalizes phone unlocking, with a frustrating caveat
    "​House passes bill that legalizes phone unlocking, with a frustrating caveat."

    Well that spells it OUT. If you purchased a 1520, IN-FULL, you therefore, posses the inalienable right to have AT&T take the shackles off your property - by providing you the UNLOCK Code.
    You're a little premature with that statement.
    xandros9 likes this.
    02-27-2014 10:40 AM
  5. ike2000's Avatar
    You're a little premature with that statement.
    Not exactly. There is a billion percent chance the democratic senate will ratify this bill. So - consider this: a Done DEAL - the reason for my BIG excitement.
    Jazmac likes this.
    02-27-2014 11:06 AM
  6. radmanvr's Avatar
    Here is my question though How well will it run on T-Mobile or any other GSM service considering its not optimized for it
    02-27-2014 11:43 AM
  7. Ordeith's Avatar
    And if saving money on plans is what you are after you could put it on aio without needing to unlock it.
    02-27-2014 11:57 AM
  8. oditius's Avatar
    Mine is already unlocked. All I did was go to the AT&T unlock page, fill it out and a day later got the code.

    https://www.att.com/deviceunlock/client/en_US/
    02-27-2014 06:10 PM
  9. Portlandia's Avatar
    Are you current ATT customer?

    Mine is already unlocked. All I did was go to the AT&T unlock page, fill it out and a day later got the code.

    https://www.att.com/deviceunlock/client/en_US/
    02-27-2014 06:20 PM
  10. oditius's Avatar
    Are you current ATT customer?
    yeah, been since the 920 came out.
    throws2000 likes this.
    02-27-2014 06:25 PM
  11. drbanks's Avatar
    I'm not 100% sure on how this is going to be worded.

    For instance, it is currently illegal in the US to unlock a new phone without your carrier's permission. They could remove the part about that being illegal, but it's still a far cry from requiring AT&T to unlock your phone. It'd just make it legal for you to obtain an unlock from anyone who offers one, but it possibly wouldn't guarantee that one would be available.

    Too often, bills like this leave gaping holes like that. Congress gets credit for doing "something," yet we're still screwed because some carrier gets a nationwide exclusive on a phone and doesn't allow anyone else access to the unlock codes - and doesn't make them available to those who aren't their customers. Yeah, it's technically legal to unlock, but good luck finding the code if that carrier doesn't want you to. Right now, they're playing sort of nice because Congress have threatened to do something, but if they can succeed in getting Congress to pass something sufficiently watered down that it doesn't appreciably change the landscape any, then they'll tighten right back up.
    SinisterDuck likes this.
    02-28-2014 03:38 PM
  12. lancorp's Avatar
    I don't understand the big deal either. I have unlocked both my 520 and 1520 with no issues using the AT&T Unlock Portal page. Takes about 3 days to get your unlock code, but it works fine.

    Of course, there are conditions under which you will be granted an unlock (such as account in good standing, phone is free and clear and not under contract, etc.) but otherwise is pretty easy.

    I've been buying my phones non-contract (cheap 520 and my 1520 and 1020 on Craigslist) so unlocking them has been hassle-free.
    02-28-2014 05:58 PM
  13. ike2000's Avatar
    I'm not 100% sure on how this is going to be worded.

    For instance, it is currently illegal in the US to unlock a new phone without your carrier's permission. They could remove the part about that being illegal, but it's still a far cry from requiring AT&T to unlock your phone. It'd just make it legal for you to obtain an unlock from anyone who offers one, but it possibly wouldn't guarantee that one would be available.

    Too often, bills like this leave gaping holes like that. Congress gets credit for doing "something," yet we're still screwed because some carrier gets a nationwide exclusive on a phone and doesn't allow anyone else access to the unlock codes - and doesn't make them available to those who aren't their customers. Yeah, it's technically legal to unlock, but good luck finding the code if that carrier doesn't want you to. Right now, they're playing sort of nice because Congress have threatened to do something, but if they can succeed in getting Congress to pass something sufficiently watered down that it doesn't appreciably change the landscape any, then they'll tighten right back up.
    https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr1123. HR-1123 ."..To promote consumer choice and wireless competition by permitting consumers to unlock mobile wireless devices, and for other purposes."

    The wording in the bill above is clear - UNLOCK - when NOT under contract ... no obligation. That's in plain English and common sense. I wonder why many will wish it be watered down ... really baffling to note these pessimistic opinions..""
    Last edited by ike2000; 02-28-2014 at 10:19 PM.
    02-28-2014 09:58 PM
  14. palandri's Avatar
    I hope it comes true with the unlocking. I eliminated the problem years ago by switching to unbranded, unlocked phone. My wife is French and we go to France a couple of times every year, plus when you buy an unbranded phone it eliminates the bloatware carriers load on your phone.
    02-28-2014 10:22 PM
  15. ike2000's Avatar
    Thomas.gov is the Bible on congressional registry. The bill is posted here: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d113:hr1123:


    like straight from the horses mouth. The senate is more liberal, therefore, I expect the last amendment will be repealed there - making it easier, with no strings attached.
    02-28-2014 10:37 PM
  16. throws2000's Avatar
    According to the link oditius posted You can already do this online through AT&T. Why be concerned about a bill when AT&T already allows currrent and former customers to unlock their phones? Am I missing something?

    https://www.att.com/deviceunlock/client/en_US/
    03-01-2014 08:22 AM
  17. palandri's Avatar
    According to the link oditius posted You can already do this online through AT&T. Why be concerned about a bill when AT&T already allows currrent and former customers to unlock their phones? Am I missing something?

    https://www.att.com/deviceunlock/client/en_US/
    There's a history here that's you're missing.

    When the 920 came out, I was going to buy one at full price, but there was a 6 month wait for unlocking due to the 920 being an elusive deal. I had been with AT&T for about 3 years. The 6 month wait would have been during a time that I was in Europe, so I wouldn't have been allowed to unlock it before going.

    There's a whole bunch of threads in the 1520 forum where non-AT&T people bought the AT&T 1520 for full price but then were denied the unlock code when they went to the AT&T unlock site.

    Some of the reputable unlocking services were posting that they couldn't get AT&T unlock codes.

    These are just a few of things I've seen. It's not a cake walk to to get an unlock code from AT&T.
    throws2000 likes this.
    03-01-2014 09:13 AM
  18. Citizen X's Avatar
    Have YOU been battling AT&T and other monopolies for the right to UNLOCK your PAID-IN-FULL NOKIA LUMIA 1520? Well, that battle is set to be over.
    That's a lie. The bill you are referencing does not REQUIRE at@t to provide unlock codes. The legality or illegality of unlocking cellular phones is not what is impeding people from unlocking them in the case of the 1520 in the US. You need to do more research before starting alarmist threads.

    There's a whole bunch of threads in the 1520 forum where non-AT&T people bought the AT&T 1520 for full price but then were denied the unlock code when they went to the AT&T unlock site.
    This is what needs to be addressed. If someone pays full price they should get unlock codes on day one. That's the law we need.
    03-01-2014 12:53 PM
  19. ike2000's Avatar
    That's a lie. The bill you are referencing does not REQUIRE at@t to provide unlock codes. The legality or illegality of unlocking cellular phones is not what is impeding people from unlocking them in the case of the 1520 in the US. You need to do more research before starting alarmist threads.
    .....
    This is what needs to be addressed. If someone pays full price they should get unlock codes on day one. That's the law we need
    .
    "That's a lie"? What's the lie?

    You are the one that need to read - not even research - before your baseless replies. AT&T, by virtue of being a NATIONAL CARRIER, will be compelled to UNLOCK non-contract (non-subsidized) devices. I made it clear in my original posting that: "PAID-IN-FULL" devices will be covered by the bill.

    You contradicted yourself by saying: "... If someone pays full price they should get unlock codes on day one." What is the difference between "full price" and "PAID-IN-FULL"? You do NOT need another law, it is covered in HR-1123. You seem very confused!
    Last edited by ike2000; 03-02-2014 at 08:08 PM.
    03-02-2014 06:50 PM
  20. drbanks's Avatar
    I just followed your link to the bill in question. Nothing in it says that the carrier will be compelled to unlock a phone. It jst said that the owner could legally do it, or legally request someone else to do it. Doesn't mean anyone has to.
    03-02-2014 08:05 PM
  21. ike2000's Avatar
    I just followed your link to the bill in question. Nothing in it says that the carrier will be compelled to unlock a phone. It jst said that the owner could legally do it, or legally request someone else to do it. Doesn't mean anyone has to.
    What is all this dribbling with words. This is - as titled - " Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act" ... the individual - the owner will request the unlocking. I'm amazed by you trying to squeeze out the exact interpretation of the law. If the (QUALIFIED) consumer makes the request, then AT&T is compelled to obey the law and provide the unlock code.

    READ THIS:

    Unlocking at Direction of Owner-

    (1) IN GENERAL- Circumvention of a technological measure that restricts wireless telephone handsets or other wireless devices from connecting to a wireless telecommunications network--
    (A)(i) as authorized by paragraph (3) of section 201.40(b) of title 37, Code of Federal Regulations, as made effective by subsection (a), and
    (ii) as may be extended to other wireless devices pursuant to a determination in the rulemaking conducted under subsection (b), or
    (B) as authorized by an exemption adopted by the Librarian of Congress pursuant to a determination made on or after the date of enactment of this Act under section 1201(a)(1)(C) of title 17, United States Code,
    may be initiated by the owner of any such handset or other device, by another person at the direction of the owner, or by a provider of a commercial mobile radio service or a commercial mobile data service at the direction of such owner or other person, solely in order to enable such owner or a family member of such owner to connect to a wireless telecommunications network, when such connection is authorized by the operator of such network.

    (2) NO BULK UNLOCKING- Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to permit the unlocking of wireless handsets or other wireless devices, for the purpose of bulk resale, or to authorize the Librarian of Congress to authorize circumvention for such purpose under this Act, title 17, United States Code, or any other provision of law.
    (d) Rule of Construction- Except as provided in subsection (c), nothing in this Act alters, or shall be construed to alter, the authority of the Librarian of Congress under section 1201(a)(1) of title 17, United States Code.
    (e) Definitions- In this Act:
    (1) COMMERCIAL MOBILE DATA SERVICE; COMMERCIAL MOBILE RADIO SERVICE- The terms `commercial mobile data service' and `commercial mobile radio service' have the respective meanings given those terms in section 20.3 of title 47, Code of Federal Regulations, as in effect on the date of the enactment of this Act.
    (2) WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORK- The term `wireless telecommunications network' means a network used to provide a commercial mobile radio service or a commercial mobile data service.
    (3) WIRELESS TELEPHONE HANDSETS; WIRELESS DEVICES- The terms `wireless telephone handset' and `wireless device' mean a handset or other device that operates on a wireless telecommunications network
    .
    Explore this statement: "Circumvention of a technological measure that restricts wireless telephone handsets or other wireless devices from connecting to a wireless telecommunications network."

    Do not expect the congress to use street English in enacting laws. Laws are encompassing and do not require the kind of argument we are having here. LOCKING is the measure that restricts wireless telephone handsets ... from connecting to another telecommunication network (from AT&T to T-Mobile, for example.) The law is geared to "Circumvent" the restriction - by providing the UNLOCK code.

    If you are expecting to read "compelled" or "AT&T," by mention, in the bill, you need to read the bible and find out where you are, personally, named a sinner.
    Last edited by ike2000; 03-02-2014 at 08:55 PM.
    03-02-2014 08:23 PM
  22. 21stNow's Avatar
    The Act only returns the law to what was in effect on July 27, 2010. Carriers were not compelled to unlock phones at that time and will not be in the near future as a result of this law. You can look to the many AT&T customers that tried to get iPhones unlocked in 2010 as an example of a carrier not unlocking a phone even if paid for in full or the contract was completed. The consumer can request an unlock code and the carrier can say no. There isn't much new here.
    03-02-2014 11:16 PM
  23. ike2000's Avatar
    The Act only returns the law to what was in effect on July 27, 2010. Carriers were not compelled to unlock phones at that time and will not be in the near future as a result of this law. You can look to the many AT&T customers that tried to get iPhones unlocked in 2010 as an example of a carrier not unlocking a phone even if paid for in full or the contract was completed. The consumer can request an unlock code and the carrier can say no. There isn't much new here.
    I care less how the carriers operate. We are in a country of law and order - a company or citizens does not choose which laws to obey. I seriously, don't give a hoot.

    My qualm is ONLY inproper disclosure. If the carrier's terms are laid out, then, the consumer makes the ultimate decision to engage that carrier or not. However, what obtains - as in the case of Lumia 1520 - is deceptive practice by AT&T, where it is advertised (still on the Microsoft site) as a "No Contract" device - without fine print of the the contract requirement. This clearly is: DECEPTION.

    Companies always play hardball, only if you allow them to. Besides this act, there are other provisions in consumer laws which prohibit false advertisement and promote binding disclosure clauses. The carriers are well aware of these, you can hit them in the balls via these avenues. They equally, are leery of their good names and not wanting to be perceived in bad eyes. Does Fair Trade Doctrine ring a bell?

    Listen, I'm through with this topic. Can't explain anymore. The law is what it is and ALL, irrespective of creed, must abide by the letters of the law.

    Finally, if the refuse to give the code, they can be hacked, easily! Apple and AT&T were victims of these in the early days of the iPhone, if you remember. Just don't open another invitation to that community.
    03-03-2014 12:36 AM
  24. palandri's Avatar
    ...Listen, I'm through with this topic. Can't explain anymore....

    I'll close it for you. If you want it reopened just send me a PM. Thanks!
    03-03-2014 01:11 AM

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