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  1. palandri's Avatar
    Fedora 17 has been release:

    Fedora Project Homepage
    05-29-2012 10:44 AM
  2. selfcreation's Avatar
    what is this exactly? some sort of new PC OS?
    05-29-2012 12:20 PM
  3. palandri's Avatar
    what is this exactly? some sort of new PC OS?
    Yes, a free, open source PC OS.
    05-29-2012 12:25 PM
  4. speedtouch's Avatar
    what is this exactly? some sort of new PC OS?
    It's a flavor of Linux.
    palandri likes this.
    05-29-2012 01:03 PM
  5. ninjaap's Avatar
    Interesting.
    05-29-2012 01:05 PM
  6. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    http://fedoraproject.org/

    I'll have to try it. :)


    Sent from my Lumia 900 using Board Express
    05-29-2012 02:54 PM
  7. palandri's Avatar
    Fedora Project Homepage

    I'll have to try it. :)


    Sent from my Lumia 900 using Board Express
    Are you running SuSE 12.1 right now? SuSE 12.1 is a pretty solid Linux distribution. I was using it for a while and I really liked it.
    05-29-2012 03:14 PM
  8. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Yes. SUSE 12.1 with KDE 4.8.2.

    Sent from my Lumia 900 using Board Express
    palandri likes this.
    05-29-2012 05:49 PM
  9. palandri's Avatar
    I just installed Fedora 17, 64bit on my main laptop, dual booting with Win7 64bit.

    The Fedora group didn't make the installation as easy as they could have. You have to manually partition your hard drive. If you have never done that before, and don't understand sda, sda1, sda2, sda3 or where to install the bootloader. DON'T try it, you'll end up wiping out your hard drive. If you want to try Linux, I would recommend Linux Mint 13 which I posted about here: http://forums.windowscentral.com/off-topic/192522.htm It does all the partitioning for you.

    I first ran the Fedora 17 live CD to see if the Broadcom wireless driver were included. They haven't been in the past, and you would have to change some script to get them installed, then an update would later wipe them out, and you would have to install them again.

    After the installation, there were 88 updates (95MB) including a new kernel 3.3.7-1Fe17 64bit.

    So far, so good.
    Last edited by palandri; 05-29-2012 at 07:47 PM.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    05-29-2012 07:27 PM
  10. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I just installed Fedora 17, 64bit on my main laptop, dual booting with Win7 64bit.

    The Fedora group didn't make the installation as easy as they could have. You have to manually partition your hard drive. If you have never don't that before, and don't understand sda, sda1, sda2, sda3 or where to install the bootloader. DON'T try it, you'll end up wiping out your hard drive. If you want to try Linux, I would recommend Linux Mint 13 which I posted about here: http://forums.windowscentral.com/off-topic/192522.htm It does all the partitioning for you.

    I first ran the Fedora 17 live CD to see if the Broadcom wireless driver were included. They haven't been in the past, and you would have to change some script to get them installed, then an update would later wipe them out, and you would have to install them again.

    After the installation, there were 88 updates (95MB) including a new kernel 3.3.7-1Fe17 64bit.

    So far, so good.
    I like Gparted for my partitioning.
    palandri likes this.
    05-29-2012 07:39 PM
  11. palandri's Avatar
    Here's a screenshot of Fedora 17

    Laura Knotek likes this.
    05-29-2012 07:59 PM
  12. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Nice! :)

    I also have Gnome 3 installed in SUSE 12.1, but I prefer KDE 4.8.2.

    I'll have to try Fedora 17 KDE Spin.

    I've always liked rpm distros better than Debian distros.
    palandri likes this.
    05-30-2012 12:18 AM
  13. speedtouch's Avatar
    Nice! :)

    I also have Gnome 3 installed in SUSE 12.1, but I prefer KDE 4.8.2.

    I'll have to try Fedora 17 KDE Spin.

    I've always liked rpm distros better than Debian distros.
    If you like rpm distros, give CentOS a try. I assume you already know this, but for those who don't, Fedora is the precursor for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Red Hat sponsors Fedora and Fedora is where all the new technologies, drivers, kernels, etc. are tested out on the Linux enthusiast folks. Once these features have been stabilized, they're baked in to RHEL and released to the commercial enterprise market. Red Hat is an open source company. They publish the source code of RHEL so that if you're feeling froggy you can get the RHEL source code and compile your own RHEL installation. CentOS is the Community Enterprise Operating System and it *is* RHEL just without the Red Hat and RHEL branding and logos.

    So if you want stability at the expense of cutting edge features, give CentOS a try. I flip between CentOS and openSUSE. Both are excellent. I also do Solaris 10 for x86 and SPARC.
    palandri and Laura Knotek like this.
    05-31-2012 10:22 AM
  14. palandri's Avatar
    I always keep an eye on DistroWatch DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD. They post all the latest distributions. I am always trying different distributions for the fun of it.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    05-31-2012 04:39 PM
  15. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I subscribe to DistroWatch's RSS feeds to find out what's new.

    Sent from my Lumia 900 using Board Express
    palandri likes this.
    05-31-2012 05:24 PM
  16. palandri's Avatar
    The 3.4 kernel was released today for Fedora 17
    06-08-2012 11:52 PM
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