1. LumiaWorld's Avatar
    The title says it all... Sorry for turning WPCentral into Yahoo Answers lol
    03-02-2014 04:53 AM
  2. Bryan Sayas's Avatar
    Read books.
    snowmutt, rdubmu and LumiaWorld like this.
    03-02-2014 09:20 AM
  3. blehblehbleh's Avatar
    For one practice whenever you get a chance whether speaking, listening, or reading. Second pay attention to word and idiom usage. Even native speakers pick the wrong word to try to get across what they mean. Third, pay attention to intent and context behind the words.
    LumiaWorld and xandros9 like this.
    03-02-2014 06:20 PM
  4. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    There's a slight problem with your question. I'll explain.

    English isn't an easy language and it's made even harder because right off there's two versions of it, in general, US and UK (Canadian and Australia and similar to UK with spelling). So you need to decide which is more to your liking when it comes to spelling and speaking.

    Next is that even in countries where the language is the same there is the problem of accent, slang and general usage. For example I live in the UK but I'm originally from Canada and I lived in Australia. I found difficulty with language in both Australia and UK and I'm a native English speaker.

    To make matters worse, lots of English speaking people do not follow proper grammar rules. So even if you take classes you'll notice that in everyday language people don't follow the grammar all the time.

    Personally I think the Internet has some of the worse grammar you can find anywhere so I agree with reading books over the internet.

    My suggestions, go to English speaking clubs and befriend English speaking people. Be sure to tell the people that you need help and be sure to ask questions. Don't get frustrated that you don't pick something up the first time. Ask people to speak slower as well. Don't get offended if you get lost in the conversation between two English people, just ask questions afterwards or when there is a pause.

    Watch English television programs and movies. Watch English YouTube videos. I'm sure there's other things on the internet can be used to practice with.

    Mostly, be patient.

    These same rules apply for any language you may want to learn.
    palandri, snowmutt, jmshub and 7 others like this.
    03-03-2014 02:41 AM
  5. snowmutt's Avatar
    I think one of the hardest things about English, especially here in the US, is that it is such a melting pot of other languages there are no longer any set grammer rules. As French speaking people were absorbed into the country, so to was their lingo. (Canadians probably understand that example.) We are seeing it now as Spanish speaking people are becoming the normal, now. I am seeing all kinds of spanish words being used.

    Read, read, and read some more. I have spent a ton of time trying to learn correct English, and it is my native tongue.
    03-03-2014 02:53 AM
  6. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    As French speaking people were absorbed into the country, so to was their lingo. (Canadians probably understand that example.)
    Speaking as a Canadian I can say for certain that aside from some words, our grammar has stayed constant. The problem of course is that Canada is a fairly large country so it's possible it may have had more of effect on the Eastern side rather than the west. If our language follows anything it's the US and other trends when it comes to slang.

    The most major effect that French has had on our language is possibly pronunciation. It's were we get our extended vowels from. Though I have to admit there are some accents here in the UK that are similar so I can't say that for certain.
    03-03-2014 03:04 AM
  7. palandri's Avatar
    There was kind of a similar thread started in the off topic area of the smartwatch forum about learning a foreign language: What foreign language have you always wanted to learn but never found the time to learn? - Smartwatch Fans Forum I made a post over there, about what helped me:

    I think what's really critical with learning a new language is being able to think in the new language. I never really had a desire to learn another language until I met my wife in 1983. My wife is French and we go to France a couple of times every year. So I thought it would be a good idea to learn French

    Here's my experience with learning French:

    I started out with all the video tapes, cassette tapes, CD's & DVD's they had at the public library, which gave me a lot of basics. I even went through the ones for kids, like for 3 to 7 year old kids, because that was the level I was at.

    Then I started taking non-credited conversational French classes (four different levels) at a local college, and then I repeated the four levels, which really improved my basic understanding of French and I was starting to understand the grammar, but I was still saying, "Parlez-vous anglais?" when I was in France.

    Then I started taking the credited French classes at a local college and that made all the difference in the world. You're paying $300 - $400 per semester, plus a couple hundred for books, so it made me study harder to ace the classes because I didn't want to waste the money. After my first semester I was finally able to start thinking in French which makes all the difference in the world, rather than trying to translate each word in my head.
    Laura Knotek and LumiaWorld like this.
    03-03-2014 10:32 AM
  8. anon5997296's Avatar
    Read a lot maybe books, maybe internet. I read a lot on internet and watch English movies. And trust me.. It works really. Also, if English isn't your mothertongue use more more English for texting with your friends and while talking with them. I did all this and now I can speak quite good English..
    03-03-2014 10:38 AM
  9. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    There was kind of a similar thread started in the off topic area of the smartwatch forum about learning a foreign language: What foreign language have you always wanted to learn but never found the time to learn? - Smartwatch Fans Forum I made a post over there, about what helped me:
    I was told this a while back, but didn't think to add it here. One of the downsides of thinking about your own language. I met an engineer in Australia who was British but was fluent in French. He told this as well. He also to me that he sometimes used 'thinking in different' languages as a way of looking at a problem because sometimes you come out with a different answer. He was a very interesting character. He did start to repeat his stories though...
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 03-04-2014 at 04:16 AM.
    03-03-2014 10:40 AM
  10. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I think one of the hardest things about English, especially here in the US, is that it is such a melting pot of other languages there are no longer any set grammer rules. As French speaking people were absorbed into the country, so to was their lingo. (Canadians probably understand that example.) We are seeing it now as Spanish speaking people are becoming the normal, now. I am seeing all kinds of spanish words being used.

    Read, read, and read some more. I have spent a ton of time trying to learn correct English, and it is my native tongue.
    Another big issue is that people have different accents in various parts of the US. If one travels to Massachusetts (especially Boston), Georgia, Indiana, etc., the accents will be much different. I was told by a Canadian co-worker that I have a heavy Midwestern accent.

    The only similarity one will find is that TV newscasters typically sound the same no matter what city or state they are in.
    LumiaWorld and palandri like this.
    03-03-2014 12:25 PM
  11. rdubmu's Avatar
    In Seattle we are know to have no accent as the area has one of the highest literacy levels in the US. One key is that the King County Library system is the most visited in the country.

    Do people in the Northwest have an accent? - Local - MyNorthwest.com

    Thou this article clearly states as do have an accent :) the best bet is going to a library and start reading.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-03-2014 09:50 PM
  12. anon(8985111)'s Avatar
    I used to have a Canadian language buddy and some of the expressions I was asking her about she was not familiar with either since it seems I mix all kind of different English styles (American, British...) into one. So are there a lot of British English vocabulary that Americans would not know? Or simply not use? Suppose they could still easily being guessed given the context though?
    09-04-2014 07:10 PM
  13. xandros9's Avatar
    I am a native English (US) speaker and I habitually watch the British show Top Gear.

    While perfectly understandable about all the time, some words are different causing confusion, although I eventually figured it out.
    One that stands out is the use of the word "bonnet" which I never heard used to refer to the "hood" before the show.
    I saw a dash cam video from a driver in Australia some time ago, and he referred to this other vehicle as a "ute" which is never used here in the US. (it was a pickup truck, although the usage might be more broad)
    anon(8985111) likes this.
    09-04-2014 09:25 PM
  14. Bobvfr's Avatar
    In answer to the question "How to be more fluent in English".

    My answer would be "Don't talk to Americans"

    I will get my coat............




    Bob
    09-06-2014 08:16 AM
  15. switch side method's Avatar
    Watch loads of monty python and stay away from Justin Beiber.... Job done
    09-06-2014 08:28 AM
  16. anon(8985111)'s Avatar
    It's funny everytime I watch the British News channels I feel they use way more different words actually meaning more or less the same. Everytime they have some coverage from the US it appears it's easier for foreigners to understand. But I'm not sure whether that's just my interpretation and of course the more different words one can use the nicer the actual style of the language becomes...

    Studying adjectives in English can be really painful sometimes :D
    09-06-2014 08:50 AM
  17. worldspy99's Avatar
    Another big issue is that people have different accents in various parts of the US. If one travels to Massachusetts (especially Boston), Georgia, Indiana, etc., the accents will be much different. I was told by a Canadian co-worker that I have a heavy Midwestern accent.

    The only similarity one will find is that TV newscasters typically sound the same no matter what city or state they are in.
    BTW, the Mid Western accent is the most neutral accent and one that is most coveted for broadcast journalism and hence the reason most TV newscasters sound the same.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-06-2014 08:58 AM
  18. worldspy99's Avatar
    Learning to speak multiple languages at a young age helps wire the brain in such a way that one is able to think in multiple languages. English is a second language for me, albeit I started to learn it at age three. I agree with Palandri that concerted effort to learn the language so that you can think in that language is a really great way to become fluent in it. Also practicing a language at every opportunity possible helps tremendously as well. I'm currently trying to become fluent in Spanish but am too lazy to spare the time for it.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-06-2014 09:03 AM

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