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04-02-2017 08:50 PM
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  1. Guytronic's Avatar
    Small deflection here.
    I was wondering if the Borg have assimilated so many species why does the collective communicate in english?
    Would they communicate with other opposing\threatening species in their native uttering?

    What about species 8472 that has no language as we understand it because they reside in fluidic space?

    Ah well...sorry about the wanderings.
    Back to the original topic.

    I do have a slightly western drawl and I do rely on slang quite a bit.
    ...not mention mild humor is comforting to me also.
    02-05-2017 11:00 PM
  2. a5cent's Avatar
    I was wondering if the Borg have assimilated so many species why does the collective communicate in english?
    Would they communicate with other opposing\threatening species in their native uttering?

    western drawl and I do rely on slang quite a bit.
    ...not mention mild humor is comforting to me also.

    The borg are an advanced species. What language the collective speaks depends on the location of the listener (like all TV series). 😀

    Hmmm a western drawl... and here I thought only southerners were allowed to have one of those.
    Guytronic and Laura Knotek like this.
    02-05-2017 11:08 PM
  3. Scienceguy Labs's Avatar
    The loophole that allows all species across the galaxy, other than 8472 for reasons mentioned above, to speak English is the Universal Translator. I guess it is the future of Skype's real-time translator maybe. Ha ha :D
    Guytronic, libra89, a5cent and 1 others like this.
    02-06-2017 05:56 AM
  4. Kot Prada's Avatar
    Spanglish has many different iterations. For example, if you were to say "don't let me down" it would be "no me embarques". Well, we would say "don't embarcate me". That's one way we've destroyed the Queen's English. The most common form is simply flipping between English and Spanish multiple times throughout a sentence. We do this subconsciously and don't even realize it until someone who's not bilingual points it out. I'm sure it happens among speakers of other languages, we've just made it an art form.
    OK. But, as I already told, it's an art only from Your perspective, since every country has hundreds of dialects, and it's not worth of mentioning as a "native language".
    Guytronic likes this.
    02-06-2017 06:39 AM
  5. fatclue_98's Avatar
    OK. But, as I already told, it's an art only from Your perspective, since every country has hundreds of dialects, and it's not worth of mentioning as a "native language".
    It's not something to be taken seriously. Chill.
    Guytronic, libra89, a5cent and 1 others like this.
    02-06-2017 03:01 PM
  6. StayClassy101's Avatar
    One thing I've found amazing is the amount of language based keyboards and system wide language changes that can be made in windows 10. For me, US English and Albanian with some Serbo-Croatian.
    02-06-2017 05:06 PM
  7. decider's Avatar
    Cantonese
    02-06-2017 05:37 PM
  8. cactuspete23's Avatar
    Well USA is about the size of Europe.... So differences by state/region can be like another country in Europe
    fatclue_98 and Guytronic like this.
    02-07-2017 06:48 AM
  9. zet ge ka's Avatar
    My native language is turkish, 5'th most speaked language all over the would.
    a5cent and Guytronic like this.
    02-07-2017 11:45 AM
  10. a5cent's Avatar
    Well USA is about the size of Europe.... So differences by state/region can be like another country in Europe
    Nope.

    The USA is about twice the size of geographical Europe (although the USA is comparitively empty, i.e. has a smaller population).

    More importantly, the size of a country has almost nothing to do with the variability in regional languages and dialects. Things like average mobility and cultural intermingling are far more important.

    The main differences result from the fact that Europeans colonized the USA at a time when it was already possible to travel around the world. In Europe however, cultural boarders were drawn and languages and dialects developed when for most people, traveling 50 miles was the trip of a lifetime.

    As a result, there is more language and dialect variability within a 100 mile radius of my home (Switzerland), than there is across the entire USA.

    That is neither better nor worse, so don't take that as an offensive comment. It's just different.
    Last edited by a5cent; 02-07-2017 at 05:52 PM.
    02-07-2017 05:21 PM
  11. fatclue_98's Avatar
    Nope.

    The USA is about twice the size of geographical Europe (although the USA is comparitively empty, i.e. has a smaller population).

    More importantly, the size of a country has almost nothing to do with the variability in regional languages and dialects. Things like average mobility and cultural intermingling are far more important.

    The main differences result from the fact that Europeans colonized the USA at a time when it was already possible to travel around the world. In Europe however, cultural boarders were drawn and languages and dialects developed when for most people, traveling 50 miles was the trip of a lifetime.

    As a result, there is more language and dialect variability within a 100 mile radius of my home (Switzerland), than there is across the entire USA.

    That is neither better nor worse, so don't take that as an offensive comment. It's just different.
    You ever talked to a Cajun? You'd swear they're from outer space with their syntax.

    Sent from Acer Switch 10 on mTalk
    02-07-2017 09:20 PM
  12. Guytronic's Avatar
    You ever talked to a Cajun?
    ...or someone from Scotland :)
    (My dad immigrated from Scotland)
    libra89, a5cent and fatclue_98 like this.
    02-07-2017 10:08 PM
  13. cactuspete23's Avatar
    The UK really does have a lot of different accents from town to town... Though maybe I can just tell that because English is my native language.
    a5cent, Laura Knotek and Guytronic like this.
    02-08-2017 06:02 AM
  14. a5cent's Avatar
    You ever talked to a Cajun? You'd swear they're from outer space with their syntax.
    No, but I wish I had. 😀 Anyway, personal experience is not the source of what I stated above. It's a rather well established fact in the etymological field.

    To those of you thinking I can't completely judge language variability in the US, I'd say that's true (although I've been pretty much everywhere in the U.S. except the south east, and have yet to meet someone I can't understand).

    However, then also consider how well you've mastered any of the languages that are spoken accross the mountainous regions of Europe (like the alps, where hundreds of years ago mobility was very low), and how well you can judge language variability in those areas.... probably not at all.

    You'll just have to trust me on this one. Language variability across the U.S. is very low compared to what I find in a 100 mile radius of my home.
    02-08-2017 08:01 AM
  15. fatclue_98's Avatar
    I've been pretty much everywhere in the U.S. except the south east, and have yet to meet someone I can't understand).
    I rest my case.
    02-08-2017 10:31 AM
  16. sinime's Avatar
    Non-specific English
    Last edited by sinime; 02-08-2017 at 11:12 AM.
    02-08-2017 10:54 AM
  17. a5cent's Avatar
    I rest my case.

    😝
    Guytronic likes this.
    02-08-2017 01:19 PM
  18. tgp's Avatar
    I've been pretty much everywhere in the U.S. except the south east, and have yet to meet someone I can't understand
    Yes I agree with your observation. I don't think US English really has dialects; its variations are more in accents. I have a strong Midwestern accent, but I've never had trouble understand people in the Northeast such as Boston, or the deep South such as Mississippi.

    I just took a trip down memory lane to the first time I visited London, many years ago. I was unprepared for the British accent. I did struggle a bit at first! However, I've gained a bit of experience since then. Now, I can sometimes tell a foreign speaker's first language by their accent when speaking English.
    02-08-2017 03:06 PM
  19. mtf1380's Avatar
    I speak poor English, would rather laugh, and love listening to ALL accents: Irish; English; Swedish; German; Scottish are among my favorites, and I will not lie, very often, I have to say: "I'm sorry, can you repeat that?" One of my very best friends is from the Czech Republic, and he too is a delight to listen to.
    02-08-2017 03:07 PM
  20. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Yes I agree with your observation. I don't think US English really has dialects; its variations are more in accents. I have a strong Midwestern accent, but I've never had trouble understand people in the Northeast such as Boston, or the deep South such as Mississippi.

    I just took a trip down memory lane to the first time I visited London, many years ago. I was unprepared for the British accent. I did struggle a bit at first! However, I've gained a bit of experience since then. Now, I can sometimes tell a foreign speaker's first language by their accent when speaking English.
    I had to watch JFK's inauguration speech when I was in high school. I couldn't understand a word of it.

    I typically don't have any issues with the London accent. It is the Cockney accent that is hard for me to understand.
    02-08-2017 03:49 PM
  21. fatclue_98's Avatar
    I had to watch JFK's inauguration speech when I was in high school. I couldn't understand a word of it.

    I typically don't have any issues with the London accent. It is the Cockney accent that is hard for me to understand.
    Don't pahk the cah in the yahd!
    02-08-2017 04:23 PM
  22. mtf1380's Avatar
    Don't pahk the cah in the yahd!
    Heard it all my life:)
    02-08-2017 05:12 PM
  23. mtf1380's Avatar
    I had to watch JFK's inauguration speech when I was in high school. I couldn't understand a word of it.
    Funny you should mention JFK, my Mother was a Bostonian through and through; we move to Southern California when I was 2, but she NEVER lost her STRONG Boston dialect.
    02-08-2017 05:12 PM
  24. fatclue_98's Avatar
    Funny you should mention JFK, my Mother was a Bostonian through and through; we move to Southern California when I was 2, but she NEVER lost her STRONG Boston dialect.
    Funny how that happens. My wife lived in N. Jersey until she was in high school yet she doesn't talk like your typical New Yorker. Went to New York about 2 years ago and after a day there I didn't recognize her speech anymore. It was like I was married to Rosie Perez. It all came back and I had to de-program her when we got home.
    mtf1380, Guytronic, a5cent and 2 others like this.
    02-08-2017 05:33 PM
  25. a5cent's Avatar
    Don't pahk the cah in the yahd!
    I have no idea what the Cockney accent is, but this sounds like "The Sopranos" to me. Am I at least close?
    02-08-2017 06:09 PM
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