08-20-2011 09:33 AM
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  1. IamDefiler's Avatar
    08-18-2011 02:41 PM
  2. Polychrome's Avatar
    I still consider Windows Phone to be Windows Mobile since it's running the same kernel from my understanding, but I'm very sure to note the differences to anyone who asks. There definitely is something to be said about the new interface.

    Just here confirming... there's no "conspiracy" or anything like that. Most carrier employees do have older versions of WinMo stuck in the back of their head. And while it was exceedingly flexible for a mobile platform (sheesh, with a patch I could run Monkey Island 3 on my old Omnia 2 and it ran really well), many were confused by having what was essentially a desktop OS crammed into a phone, and all the RAM-eating crapware manufacturers stuffed in didn't help things.

    Problem: Customers expect a phone to be user friendly to the point that a newborn baby could hack into Sandia Labs with it. (Must be all that iPhone training.)

    For the record, Android is starting to show its true colors and fail horribly in the user friendliness aspect, but not every store or call center rep understands their customers aren't always willing to pull their battery when their phone locks up, or hard reset when the programs have pummeled the phone into the ground.

    Most of the Android Phones even fall to the same major issue Windows Mobile 6.5 and below did: The manufacturers place so much crapware on the devices that all but the extremely nerdy end up with a volatile, crash-prone gadget that is way over their heads. Reps know when to reboot or hard reset and consider it a fact of life. Customers do not.

    Let's not even get into Android's horribly glitchy email support... If anybody's main desire is email, I'm selling them a blackberry without question. I've been on the tail end of far too many too-good-to-be-true business deals where some IT consultant called in wondering why their Androids didn't handle their systems nearly as well as an old Blackberry, and ranted for hours on end as I tried to placate them with probable solutions.

    So now we've got a new OS that is not only stable, it offers a bit of customization that the 'ol iPhone is still behind on. You'd expect that to be a winner right?

    The internet and reviews can only say so much. The sales cards are right... opinions change *drastically* when you shove the phone into someone's hands. My husband played with mine for mere minutes, and bought one for himself later that week. The problem is getting that out to the employees rather than the customers.
    Rhody#WP likes this.
    08-19-2011 07:39 PM
  3. Rhody#WP's Avatar
    I still consider Windows Phone to be Windows Mobile since it's running the same kernel from my understanding, but I'm very sure to note the differences to anyone who asks. There definitely is something to be said about the new interface.

    Just here confirming... there's no "conspiracy" or anything like that. Most carrier employees do have older versions of WinMo stuck in the back of their head. And while it was exceedingly flexible for a mobile platform (sheesh, with a patch I could run Monkey Island 3 on my old Omnia 2 and it ran really well), many were confused by having what was essentially a desktop OS crammed into a phone, and all the RAM-eating crapware manufacturers stuffed in didn't help things.

    Problem: Customers expect a phone to be user friendly to the point that a newborn baby could hack into Sandia Labs with it. (Must be all that iPhone training.)

    For the record, Android is starting to show its true colors and fail horribly in the user friendliness aspect, but not every store or call center rep understands their customers aren't always willing to pull their battery when their phone locks up, or hard reset when the programs have pummeled the phone into the ground.

    Most of the Android Phones even fall to the same major issue Windows Mobile 6.5 and below did: The manufacturers place so much crapware on the devices that all but the extremely nerdy end up with a volatile, crash-prone gadget that is way over their heads. Reps know when to reboot or hard reset and consider it a fact of life. Customers do not.

    Let's not even get into Android's horribly glitchy email support... If anybody's main desire is email, I'm selling them a blackberry without question. I've been on the tail end of far too many too-good-to-be-true business deals where some IT consultant called in wondering why their Androids didn't handle their systems nearly as well as an old Blackberry, and ranted for hours on end as I tried to placate them with probable solutions.

    So now we've got a new OS that is not only stable, it offers a bit of customization that the 'ol iPhone is still behind on. You'd expect that to be a winner right?

    The internet and reviews can only say so much. The sales cards are right... opinions change *drastically* when you shove the phone into someone's hands. My husband played with mine for mere minutes, and bought one for himself later that week. The problem is getting that out to the employees rather than the customers.
    You know, everything you wrote is true, but I have a different perspective. WM was basically a windows operating system crammed into a phone, just like Android (and iOS?) is Linux crammed into a phone. Back in the day WM had some amazing hardware (for the time) and you could load any software you wanted, tweak the registry, customize the crap out of it, etc. MS realized (way too late) Apple was killing them BECAUSE their OS was closed, making it problem-free and easy to pick up and use. WP7 basically took the WM kernel and made it more like iOS and less like Android, while Android appears to be traveling the same road WM did.
    08-20-2011 09:33 AM
28 12
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