09-18-2013 11:39 AM
38 12
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  1. gsquared's Avatar
    How is it a security issue ?

    No one has explained this to me yet.
    You store your employers WiFi password on an Android device. GOOG, or potentially someone else now has that password and can use it to access your employers network. Why do you think there are so many companies that do not allow Android devices on their networks in the first place?
    09-17-2013 08:38 AM
  2. foxbat121's Avatar
    You store your employers WiFi password on an Android device.
    Any employer relies on WiFi password for security deserves what they got. My employer's wifi access is wide open with no Wi-Fi password at all. But in order to access the company network, you will need VPN and key FOB.
    tk-093 likes this.
    09-17-2013 08:54 AM
  3. arrowrand's Avatar
    There lies the dilemma. You are allowing GOOG to store WiFi password to access points that do not belong to you. Did you bother to get the owners permission before letting GOOG have that password for whatever purpose they want it? Maybe the owner of that access point doesn't want GOOG to have that password.
    Not a dilemma for me at all.
    09-17-2013 08:58 AM
  4. arrowrand's Avatar
    They are two completely different problems. Google's approach is a potential security issue, Microsoft's is bad design. That said, setup over WiFi is rumoured to come with GDR3.
    Allowing Google to backup my WiFi passwords is no more of a security threat than having a sensitive conversation over Skype is.
    09-17-2013 09:28 AM
  5. arrowrand's Avatar
    You store your employers WiFi password on an Android device. GOOG, or potentially someone else now has that password and can use it to access your employers network. Why do you think there are so many companies that do not allow Android devices on their networks in the first place?
    There's no potential for any of that. It's a talking point that is pointless. Google isn't accessing anything, and they don't hand over user data to anyone, so there is no "someone else".

    And don't bring up the NSA, Prism or FISA. Microsoft is a US corporation and will hand over anything that they are required to as well.



    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 4
    MazoMark likes this.
    09-17-2013 09:32 AM
  6. thed's Avatar
    You store your employers WiFi password on an Android device. GOOG, or potentially someone else now has that password and can use it to access your employers network. Why do you think there are so many companies that do not allow Android devices on their networks in the first place?
    If your employer really cares about security then they wouldn't be using passwords for their wifi network. Passwords should be for personal networks only.

    I really don't see the problem here. Android is very transparent about this, explicitly saying that they are storing the passwords on Google servers. If you don't like this then don't check the box.
    MazoMark likes this.
    09-17-2013 09:36 AM
  7. gsquared's Avatar
    To all of you that responded to my postings. You are just as much of the problem. All I'm reading from you all is one type of excuse or another that equates to "Well thats not my problem". It really shows your true colors as to respect for others. Guess its just a character flaw.
    09-17-2013 09:42 AM
  8. thed's Avatar
    To all of you that responded to my postings. You are just as much of the problem. All I'm reading from you all is one type of excuse or another that equates to "Well thats not my problem". It really shows your true colors as to respect for others. Guess its just a character flaw.
    So just because I don't think that this is a problem, I have a character flaw and I don't respect others? That's quite a leap you made there.

    I have yet to see a compelling argument for why having this option is a problem for anyone, not just myself. You are presented with this option during setup. It's very clearly labeled. And Google makes it easy to delete your stuff from their servers if you change your mind. Why take this away from people who might find it convenient?

    And really, as a general rule, if you store anything in the cloud you should assume that the cloud provider can look at it.
    09-17-2013 10:32 AM
  9. arrowrand's Avatar
    To all of you that responded to my postings. You are just as much of the problem. All I'm reading from you all is one type of excuse or another that equates to "Well thats not my problem". It really shows your true colors as to respect for others. Guess its just a character flaw.
    You're actually the problem because you're making baseless assumptions.

    Of the 4 AP's that I have stored on Google's servers that aren't mine, or under my direct control, those passwords are written down on slips of paper, written in planners or on notebooks or stored in plain text as a note on a device.

    I'm probably among the most secure keepers of that password.

    You also assume that because I have the WiFi password, that I'm within that organizations business network. You're wrong in all but 1 case. 3 are password protected guest networks totally disconnected from the internal network. The 1 that isn't is a coffee shop.

    Two of the passwords are hanging on the wall in the reception area of these companies, and if you look in the window from the street, you can see it. Plain as day. Not important, because connecting to that network doesn't get you inside of their firewall, it gets you internet access.

    You also assume, wrongly, that everyone would be as mortally offended as you by someone backing up a WiFi password to Google. Or Apple, as they so it as well.

    You also assume, wrongly, that everyone's Google tinfoil hat is as tight as your own.
    09-17-2013 11:45 AM
  10. EZJ's Avatar
    Android is open-source - you are free to take the code apart to see if it is in fact reporting things about you that it shouldn't (note that you can opt out of things like location tracking etc). I much prefer this to WP, which is closed-source. Hell, rebuild it from source and flash to a Nexus if that's what you want...

    This feature is IMHO very useful. I change my phone around twice a year and it saves a lot of trouble having to go around adding wifi passwords again. And like you said, I can't imagine what Google will do with a bunch of SSIDs and passwords, so I don't mind letting them have it.
    Android itself might be open source. But the Google Apps are not and yet pretty much everyone has them. Who is to say these aren't collecting other information? Especially Google Play comes to mind.
    09-17-2013 04:00 PM
  11. ohgood's Avatar
    You store your employers WiFi password on an Android device. GOOG, or potentially someone else now has that password and can use it to access your employers network. Why do you think there are so many companies that do not allow Android devices on their networks in the first place?
    I can't see Google going out and war driving for joes pizza's secret dealings with the pastrami supplier.

    Also, I've never encountered a company that didn't allow android devices myself. Maybe I should get out more. :D
    09-17-2013 04:24 PM
  12. arrowrand's Avatar
    Who is to say these aren't collecting other information?
    Who is to say that they are? Certainly not you.

    None of the Google apps are open source, but the APK files have been torn apart and gone over by countless groups and individuals.

    What information is my Lumia collecting about me behind my back?
    09-17-2013 06:01 PM
  13. tk-093's Avatar
    You store your employers WiFi password on an Android device. GOOG, or potentially someone else now has that password and can use it to access your employers network. Why do you think there are so many companies that do not allow Android devices on their networks in the first place?
    Apple stores them too, companies love letting iDevices on their networks...

    To all of you that responded to my postings. You are just as much of the problem. All I'm reading from you all is one type of excuse or another that equates to "Well thats not my problem". It really shows your true colors as to respect for others. Guess its just a character flaw.
    So you're gonna insult people who don't agree with you? Character flaw? Right.....
    The fact of the matter is any business who actually uses a password to lock down their WiFi really should have no expectations of security. They should be using certificates or other ways. Heck we only allow domain connected windows machines on our corporate network. Anybody letting Android, iOS or Windows Phones on their network is just asking for trouble.
    09-18-2013 11:39 AM
38 12

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