03-26-2014 07:51 PM
45 12
tools
  1. metalchick719's Avatar
    Lithium Ion and Lithium Polymer batteries perform at their best and last longest if they charged regularly, and suffer absolutely no ill effects if charged from more than 50%. So your rule is actually not useful in any way and serves no purpose.
    Well, it serves a purpose for me, so you're wrong. Also, no reason to get nasty. I simply answered the OP's question and then tossed in my own personal preference when it comes to charging MY phone, which I think I have a right to in MY post.
    mary beth hale and justwar88 like this.
    03-13-2014 08:23 PM
  2. Jack Larson1's Avatar
    Yep, both physical wire chargers and wireless chargers are safe at night. I even charge my 920 On my jbl power up speakers overnight, its totally fine.there is a video of the results of someone's GS4 burnt charging after it started smoldering though ;)
    metalchick719 and jbjtkbw007 like this.
    03-13-2014 08:54 PM
  3. anon(8150199)'s Avatar
    That is correct. Topping off the battery regularly is best.
    Hey, my habit is to use my L920 to 40% and charge it back to 80% (charging it once a day), how long will it last?
    P.S.: It's very hot here!
    03-13-2014 11:48 PM
  4. OzRob's Avatar
    Hey, my habit is to use my L920 to 40% and charge it back to 80% (charging it once a day), how long will it last?
    P.S.: It's very hot here!
    Why don't you charge it to 100%? As to how long it will last (I'm assuming you mean before the battery degrades to the point of not being usable any more), that's really dependent on the quality of the particular battery batch yours was made from - at least a couple of years, though, and most likely more.
    03-14-2014 12:02 AM
  5. anon(8150199)'s Avatar
    Why don't you charge it to 100%? As to how long it will last (I'm assuming you mean before the battery degrades to the point of not being usable any more), that's really dependent on the quality of the particular battery batch yours was made from - at least a couple of years, though, and most likely more.
    I say so cuz I'm not sure if outside temperature (it's 40C high in March and April) can reduce batteries' longevity
    03-14-2014 02:30 AM
  6. Pete's Avatar
    Modern batteries don't need to be conditioned, and don't require special care.

    Just charge them up whenever convenient.
    justwar88 and metalchick719 like this.
    03-14-2014 04:22 AM
  7. justwar88's Avatar
    I totally agree.. They don't really need any special care. Let people charge there phone however they want to. There really is no right or wrong answer.
    metalchick719 likes this.
    03-14-2014 09:02 AM
  8. Kimberly McPherson's Avatar
    Way cool! Thanks for that lesson. I love 2 learn stuff like that!
    03-14-2014 06:47 PM
  9. LTTG's Avatar
    Thanks for the tips guys!
    03-14-2014 07:03 PM
  10. GizmoEV's Avatar
    Modern batteries don't need to be conditioned, and don't require special care.
    Actually they do. After the conditioning at the manufacturer the way you finish conditioning them is below.

    Just charge them up whenever convenient.
    And I'm not just trying to be funny. Just use them and charge when you need to. That conditions them. Li batteries continually change throughout their life for a plethora of reasons. Keeping them from the extremes means you get more total energy delivered.

    Some basic thinks to keep in mind:

    1. Don't charge if the phone battery is much below 0 degrees Celsius. Lithium plating occurs which reduces the available Li for charge shuttling which lower capacity.

    2. Besides avoiding high temperatures in general, avoid charging at high temperatures. Someone asked about 40 deg C. If you must charge at that temperature, charge for as short of a time as possible. This means use the 1.3A charger that came with the phone rather than the wireless charger or another slower charger. It is the length of time charging at high temperature that does the most damage. This is one reason why Nissan didn't expect to have the issues with the LEAFs in hot climates. Their tests didn't slow charge the battery like many of the owners did.

    3. Don't discharge your phone until it shuts off very often. Even once/month is excessive. If it seems like your phone doesn't have as much battery life as it used to then try it but don't over do it. The only purpose of discharging until the phone shuts off is to calibrate the battery monitoring circuitry. Since most of the phone batteries have a relatively steep drop in voltage from full to empty the circuitry can estimate state of charge reasonably well with voltage. (This isn't the case with LiFePO4 type cells which are not used in phones and laptops.)

    4. Charging to 100% and holding there does shorten the life of the battery but it isn't really a huge amount. Most people wouldn't even be able to tell the difference. I have phones over 4 years old and they still have a respectable battery life. I charge mine every night. If I could program it to only charge to 95% I would but that option hasn't been given us so I don't worry about it. I also never worry about getting a phone with a replaceable battery. They last so long that it doesn't matter any more.

    On a side note: partially charging/discharging NiCd batteries doesn't damage them. What it does do is fool the charge circuitry into thinking that they have reduced capacity because the voltage takes a sudden drop around the point that they usually get recharged at. If the circuitry had the smarts it would allow a deep discharge which would recover all of the capacity. A similar thing happens with NiMH batteries. I have done this many times over the years and gained all the capacity back in line with what they would have if they had been discharged completely each time.
    Jack Janik likes this.
    03-14-2014 07:33 PM
  11. OzRob's Avatar
    I say so cuz I'm not sure if outside temperature (it's 40C high in March and April) can reduce batteries' longevity
    Heat of the degree you're talking about doesn't really have any affect on batteries. Extreme cold is much more of a problem as it slows down the chemical process within the battery. So you don't need to worry about 40C temps. Just charge your phone normally. You're not making last longer by only charging it to 80%.
    03-16-2014 06:30 PM
  12. anon(8150199)'s Avatar
    Heat of the degree you're talking about doesn't really have any affect on batteries. Extreme cold is much more of a problem as it slows down the chemical process within the battery. So you don't need to worry about 40C temps. Just charge your phone normally. You're not making last longer by only charging it to 80%.
    ha, it already discharges faster than when it was cold!
    03-16-2014 08:27 PM
  13. final_fantasy781's Avatar
    I usually make sure my phone is about do die before I charge it. My parents and siblings charge their phone when ever they get a chance, so their devices never last the day.
    03-16-2014 08:36 PM
  14. OzRob's Avatar
    ha, it already discharges faster than when it was cold!
    Look, technically there are many factors that influence battery longevity, and heat is certainly one of them. But the value of the hoops you jump through to prolong battery longevity really comes down to practicality and what you're prepared to put up with.

    Yes, you can be careful not to charge your battery if the ambient temperature is over 30C. Yes, you can limit maximum charge to under 90% when the temperature is above 30C. And yes, there are a number of other things you can do to try to prolong battery longevity. All of these things do technically make a small difference. But ultimately, all things being equal, you're not talking about dramatic differences over the 'normal' operating life of a mobile phone. Whether you take all care or no care with the phone battery, you're still likely to get several years life out of it.

    I'm of the opinion that the inconvenience of micromanaging the phone (and I also live in an area where temps regularly get above 40C) outweighs the benefits it brings - the technology in today's phones and batteries has progressed to the point where much of the rigmarole we used to go through is no longer necessary. But if you're comfortable only charging to 80% when it's hot and you're diligent about it, then go for it. You will probably eke out a couple more months from your battery over it's several year lifespan, and that may be worth it for you. I suspect, though, that the majority of people will have upgrade their phones long before then.
    tgp and GizmoEV like this.
    03-16-2014 09:35 PM
  15. OzRob's Avatar
    I usually make sure my phone is about do die before I charge it. My parents and siblings charge their phone when ever they get a chance, so their devices never last the day.
    I'm not sure I see the correlation. Are you saying that because they charge their phones more often they get less battery life? From a technical perspective, that's not true (unless they have very old phones with NiCad batteries). I suspect their lack of longevity has more to do with phone usage and the particular phone they have, rather than their charging patterns.
    GizmoEV and BobLobIaw like this.
    03-16-2014 09:38 PM
  16. gomezz's Avatar
    I charge my 820 overnight if going out first thing in the morning or in the evening if it has run really low during that day. If it not going out till later the next day I will put it on charge an hour or two before I am due to go out. Also depends if I am driving some distance somewhere when I can charge it in the car or will be at work when I can charge it in the works van. More carefull to be fully charged before going out on foot somewhere for the day.
    03-17-2014 06:13 AM
  17. pgg101's Avatar
    Read this article a couple of days ago. Seems like it's okay to charge overnight and best to not let it drop to 0%.

    http://gizmodo.com/how-to-take-care-...ht-w-513217256

    Posted via the WPC App for Android! on BlackBerry Z30
    03-17-2014 07:04 AM
  18. Pete's Avatar
    I think I can sum this up thusly.

    For your charging methodology, you can either

    1) Read articles on the internet regarding battery conditioning and follow the steps detailed. Alternate days/weeks with different methods if you want to.
    2) Charge the phone whenever you feel like it for as long as you want to.

    Both methods will result in largely similar battery life for as long as you keep your phone (for a smartphone, that'll be 2-3 years).

    Peoples use of their phones (and therefore actual batter usage) varies over time, so any savings based on specific charging methods is going to be hard to quantify.
    tgp and GizmoEV like this.
    03-18-2014 09:35 AM
  19. Abi_singh_1995's Avatar
    Smartphones use smart batteries which on 100% switches to cable power that is ur charger and returns to battery power after being disconnected.

    Its totally safe for your device.
    03-26-2014 08:43 AM
  20. GizmoEV's Avatar
    Smartphones use smart batteries which on 100% switches to cable power that is ur charger and returns to battery power after being disconnected.

    Its totally safe for your device.
    Even "dumb" batteries do what you are trying to describe. This is no different than what happens with a battery in a car except that the lithium batteries in a cell phone do not have a self discharge so the charging can actually stop when needed. It isn't that the batteries are smart or dumb, it is the charging mechanism that has the smarts. When plugged it, the charging system reduces the "charging" to exactly what the phone is consuming so there is no charge into or out of the battery. It is the physics of the situation. That is why, for the most part, just charge when ever you want as stated in #2 of the previous post.
    03-26-2014 07:51 PM
45 12

Similar Threads

  1. Travelling to New York. What apps to take?
    By shamrock1988 in forum General Phone Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-21-2014, 11:02 PM
  2. Needs SIM card to work on Verizon?
    By speedtouch in forum Windows Central Archive
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-23-2014, 03:15 PM
  3. Xbox Live core services down, some users unable to sign into Xbox Live on the Xbox One
    By WindowsCentral.com in forum Windows Central News Discussion & Contests
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-12-2014, 12:45 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD