09-05-2015 04:18 AM
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  1. mprebich's Avatar
    W10m through the Insider program on a carrier phone that never officially gets the update.
    09-03-2015 08:30 AM
  2. hopmedic's Avatar
    The same principles apply. If you were to put Android on the device, still, the same principles apply. Software is never covered. Ever. Hardware is covered regardless of what software is on the phone, unless the software was the cause for hardware failure. You may have to revert to the original configuration in order to prove that it is a hardware failure and not a software issue, but still, hardware is covered. When I was doing extended warranty work, anyone with a modem not working (keep in mind, this was in 2001-2004) had to do a complete restore if other steps didn't resolve it. Why? Because through experience, we learned that due to many modems of that age being "soft" modems, restoring the system often resolved issues that were not easily discoverable in other ways. Yes, doing the restore was the last step, but if deleting drivers and letting them reinstall, or even opening the PC and reseating the modem card didn't resolve it, you were going to have to do a restore. We would not replace a modem on any computer if a restore had not been performed. No exceptions. Why? Because after doing a restore we only ended up replacing about 20% of the modems that were not fixed prior to the restore. Yes, we went by numbers.

    An example of a software problem causing a hardware failure? How about a runaway app that causes overheating to the point of battery explosion? Yes, that's a very extreme example, but you get the idea, right? Maybe the heat causes warping (which may not be covered because they may try to call that a cosmetic defect, which isn't covered, but I would fight it if they did), or causes some other problem? Keep in mind that if the device is destroyed by an explosion, or stops working due to software-induced overheating, they're not going to be able to prove it was a software problem so you're going to get it replaced, but technically, it wouldn't be covered. Technically and actually are often two different things.

    Does that answer your question?
    09-03-2015 10:56 AM
  3. mprebich's Avatar
    The same principles apply. If you were to put Android on the device, still, the same principles apply. Software is never covered. Ever. Hardware is covered regardless of what software is on the phone, unless the software was the cause for hardware failure. You may have to revert to the original configuration in order to prove that it is a hardware failure and not a software issue, but still, hardware is covered. When I was doing extended warranty work, anyone with a modem not working (keep in mind, this was in 2001-2004) had to do a complete restore if other steps didn't resolve it. Why? Because through experience, we learned that due to many modems of that age being "soft" modems, restoring the system often resolved issues that were not easily discoverable in other ways. Yes, doing the restore was the last step, but if deleting drivers and letting them reinstall, or even opening the PC and reseating the modem card didn't resolve it, you were going to have to do a restore. We would not replace a modem on any computer if a restore had not been performed. No exceptions. Why? Because after doing a restore we only ended up replacing about 20% of the modems that were not fixed prior to the restore. Yes, we went by numbers.

    An example of a software problem causing a hardware failure? How about a runaway app that causes overheating to the point of battery explosion? Yes, that's a very extreme example, but you get the idea, right? Maybe the heat causes warping (which may not be covered because they may try to call that a cosmetic defect, which isn't covered, but I would fight it if they did), or causes some other problem? Keep in mind that if the device is destroyed by an explosion, or stops working due to software-induced overheating, they're not going to be able to prove it was a software problem so you're going to get it replaced, but technically, it wouldn't be covered. Technically and actually are often two different things.

    Does that answer your question?
    Yes, that more than answered my question. To clarify, the main point that I was getting at was, if the carrier(s) don't release W10M for your phone, you can use Insider preview to upgrade. No problem. But if you have to send it in for warranty coverage, would the fact that you put W10M on it invalidate the warranty. In the case that you can still use the phone and restore to W8.1, there would likely be no issues. But if you couldn't restore, due to dead phone, and it was determined that W10M was installed, could the carrier say, "sorry, you voided the warranty when you put W10M on it". From your posts, I guess the answer to that is yes, they could say that. Would they, maybe not, as many have said they could avail of warranty service and the carrier didn't ask any questions.

    Just trying to get to the real answers, regardless of whether one could get W10M through Insider.

    Thanks.
    09-05-2015 04:18 AM
53 123

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