08-21-2014 10:38 AM
218 ... 34567 ...
tools
  1. Steve Adams's Avatar
    Doubtful that you used two flagships and found them to be laggy. Also, the fact that majority of android devices have 4.1+ now makes this "fragmented" old.
    YEs, they were. Scrolling was jumpy and not fluid like WP, and IOS for that matter. And yes, android IS fragmented. There is one WP os for all windows phones, there is one OS for all apple phones there is a dozen different android OS versions working out there now. Yes most are on 4.1, but 4.4 is the newest kit Kat? Most phones are not even upgraded jelly bean yet.

    Android is too open, ios is too cclosed and WP is just right.
    04-20-2014 05:53 AM
  2. Dantekai14's Avatar
    YEs, they were. Scrolling was jumpy and not fluid like WP, and IOS for that matter. And yes, android IS fragmented. There is one WP os for all windows phones, there is one OS for all apple phones there is a dozen different android OS versions working out there now. Yes most are on 4.1, but 4.4 is the newest kit Kat? Most phones are not even upgraded jelly bean yet.

    Android is too open, ios is too cclosed and WP is just right.
    Their is nothing called "just right" or the perfect.
    WP 8.1 is also very jumpy too. Not fluid like WP8.

    yet I like WP8.1 more than WP8.

    and I don't know about other users but I never experienced Android lag (exception of 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich)
    Latest Android 4.4 is more fluid and faster than WP. (based on Moto G experience)
    A895 likes this.
    04-20-2014 07:35 AM
  3. anony_mouse's Avatar
    Android is too open, ios is too cclosed and WP is just right.
    What nonsense. I hate IE and want to use a WebKit or Gecko based browser. This is not allowed on WP. Therefore I have to buy an Android phone. What possible reason is there for Microsoft to prevent me from using other browsers, other than evil or stupidity? Nice one Steve!
    A895 likes this.
    04-20-2014 07:38 AM
  4. Zeem Frostmaw's Avatar
    I'm sure its all subjective anyway. The web browser on my Samsung Monte was fine and that's pre-Android. -shrug-
    04-20-2014 08:53 AM
  5. Jaskys's Avatar
    So much bull**** in this thread
    04-20-2014 08:57 AM
  6. A895's Avatar
    YEs, they were. Scrolling was jumpy and not fluid like WP, and IOS for that matter.
    Hmm, were these your personal devices or devices at a store?

    And yes, android IS fragmented. There is one WP os for all windows phones, there is one OS for all apple phones there is a dozen different android OS versions working out there now. Yes most are on 4.1, but 4.4 is the newest kit Kat? Most phones are not even upgraded jelly bean yet.
    Dashboards | Android Developers

    Jelly Bean is fact the largest Android Version now and quite frankly, between 4.1-4.4 they were just behind the scenes stuff, with some notifications improvements and lock-screen widgets. The fact that majority of android devices are on 4.0+ proves that Android OS is becoming less fragmented as time goes on. Even still if it fragmented it does not affect the end consumer, because they wont care about updates anyways.

    Android is too open, ios is too cclosed and WP is just right.
    Android being open is a good thing, WP being closed is one of the problems it has. Developers have to come up with a dev team to make a proprietary app for a fledgling platform, that takes man hours, and money which not every dev/company want`s to do because the payoff may not be worth it.
    Attached Thumbnails chart-cht-p-chs-500x250-chco-c4df9b-u00252c6fad0c-chf-bg-u00252cs-u00252c00000000-chd-t-u00253a1.png  
    04-20-2014 09:39 AM
  7. mesamit's Avatar
    What nonsense. I hate IE and want to use a WebKit or Gecko based browser. This is not allowed on WP. Therefore I have to buy an Android phone. What possible reason is there for Microsoft to prevent me from using other browsers, other than evil or stupidity? Nice one Steve!
    what a crap....just ask web developer to use w3c standard while coding websites...instead of webkit ****....then you will see even IE will render page perfectly and much faster than chrome.....
    also to original poster I have no such issue you have mentioned in my lumia 620 using wp8.1 developer preview....
    04-20-2014 09:53 AM
  8. Steve Adams's Avatar
    Hmm, were these your personal devices or devices at a store?



    Dashboards | Android Developers

    Jelly Bean is fact the largest Android Version now and quite frankly, between 4.1-4.4 they were just behind the scenes stuff, with some notifications improvements and lock-screen widgets. The fact that majority of android devices are on 4.0+ proves that Android OS is becoming less fragmented as time goes on. Even still if it fragmented it does not affect the end consumer, because they wont care about updates anyways.



    Android being open is a good thing, WP being closed is one of the problems it has. Developers have to come up with a dev team to make a proprietary app for a fledgling platform, that takes man hours, and money which not every dev/company want`s to do because the payoff may not be worth it.
    THey are personal friends phones. I love trying new devices, that's what led me to WP in the beginning. Now I would never switch back. The apps argument is laughable. How many fart apps does one need.
    04-20-2014 11:15 AM
  9. tgp's Avatar
    How many fart apps does one need.
    A lot evidently. I can't imagine there's any other reason for 80% market share!
    A895 likes this.
    04-20-2014 12:22 PM
  10. anony_mouse's Avatar
    Exactly why google should have android sorted out now. But they don't. it's still super fragmented and laggy. I have used it on the note 3 and s5 and its still slow and jumpy.
    You should try Android on a Moto G. Super smooth and much faster than WP. Also, I think fragmentation (ie being used in creative and varied ways) shows just how successful android has been.
    A895 likes this.
    04-20-2014 01:31 PM
  11. anony_mouse's Avatar
    what a crap....just ask web developer to use w3c standard while coding websites...instead of webkit ****....then you will see even IE will render page perfectly and much faster than chrome.....
    also to original poster I have no such issue you have mentioned in my lumia 620 using wp8.1 developer preview....
    Please answer my question before resorting to foul language. Why do Microsoft prevent other browsers from being used on WP?
    04-20-2014 01:33 PM
  12. BadIntentVG's Avatar
    My opinion is pretty unbiased as I have used iOS, WP, and Android and have access to all 3 at work. Android's Chrome is definitely better than IE11. Which feels "faster" seems to be subjective here, so I'll just point out observations:

    -Tab reloading is far more frequent than Chrome on similar spec devices (I use HTC 8x). Like others mentioned, leave a tab with lots of content open for only 10 minutes (or shorter depending on how intense the app you switch to is), and it will often reload. Extremely annoying. Maybe it's Cortana eating up RAM in 8.1, but something about the memory management causes tabs to reload much more than in 8.0. Before the update, I could watch MyTube and play a couple games and my tabs would still be up. I find myself second guessing leaving a tab sometimes because I don't know if IE will decide it's time to reload my page and kill the text response I was writing.
    -Images on some sites don't load properly and just show that greyed out camera image. Very rare for images not to show up on Chrome. Example just go to like Teen Titans wikia or most of the Wikia sites honestly. Some have a different format, but a good half of them don't display images properly.
    -WP 8.1 added an annoyance of having the back button close your tab. Why?... Before if you pressed back after you've gone back too far, it will just hide the app. You had to actually "X" it to remove it from memory. There is no indicator that you have gone back as far as you can. That's fine, but it results in accidental tab closing with no warning.
    Dantekai14 likes this.
    04-20-2014 01:48 PM
  13. A895's Avatar
    THey are personal friends phones.
    Then your argument is flawed. Trying a friends phone and finding it laggy is user error. Especially on two flagship devices that are known to be lag free. If you tried this with these devices out of box and said it was laggy I would flow with it.

    I love trying new devices, that's what led me to WP in the beginning. Now I would never switch back.
    That`s good that is your prerogative.

    The apps argument is laughable. How many fart apps does one need.
    This argument is stupid and old. And:

    Search results for "fart" | Windows Phone Apps+Games Store (United States)

    How many fart apps one needs is a good question since there quite a number on the Windows Phone store. The bottom line is that a lot of people need use a lot of newer and popular apps like:Candy Crush, VSCO Cam, some banking apps and credit union unions, Pininterest, Quora, Flipbord, YouTube, Google+, Tango, HP ePrint, etc. A good portion of newer games aren`t on WP either such as Dots or Super Hexagon, or Family Guy: The Quest For Stuff or Cut the Rope 2, or even Minecraft.
    04-20-2014 02:26 PM
  14. Zeem Frostmaw's Avatar
    This is just getting hilariously off-topic now. :P
    04-20-2014 05:39 PM
  15. Bram Vanroy's Avatar
    This is just getting hilariously off-topic now. :P
    This. This topic has resorted to foul language, flaming and android vs. WP discussions that are based on purely subjective views. It's simple: like IE11: great! You have it at your disposal. Don't like IE11 for whatever reason (fanboy or not)? That's a pity! But don't just put a pointing finger to MS. Google has always been a pain in the *** for MS as well, it goes both ways. And, additionally, Chrome might be coming to WP - even though I guess you'll have to wait a couple of years. Google has to make a new build of Chrome, and MS has to stop being a d*ck towards 3rd party browsers. When both companies each make that single concession, Chrome might come to WP.

    Sources:
    04-20-2014 05:51 PM
  16. jlzimmerman's Avatar
    why you are comparing old devices.
    Compare it with Moto G.
    Recent devices and faster and fluid than anything else in the budget....
    Because newer phones will always perform well. What is fair is comparing phones of the same age, preferably 10+ months or older. This is where the differences in OS's is make or break. This is where you'll see Android falter and WP shine.

    My Android was great with ICS, for the first 8 months or so, then it dogged. My Android with Jelly Bean was great for the first 8 months or so, then it dogged. My WP's, which has had twice as many games and apps on it, has been a fluid beast from day one.

    In regard to IE vs Chrome, it's subjective and always will be. Use what you like and be happy.
    04-20-2014 06:06 PM
  17. SergeMcG's Avatar
    The website must have "Responsive Web Design" which resizes the page for the screensize instead of browser
    I wish I could disable that.
    04-20-2014 06:26 PM
  18. S_C_B's Avatar
    I truly dislike using the web browser on Windows Phone. The experience is just not as good as Chrome.

    I'm a longtime Android, WP and IOS user.
    04-20-2014 06:37 PM
  19. Mr Shield's Avatar
    I got Xperia Z1 with the improved fix to make Chrome faster and yes, it's insanely fast.

    My wife will soon receive a L925 and I will compare it to each other.

    Skickat från min Xperia Z1 (C6903) via Tapatalk
    04-20-2014 06:39 PM
  20. anony_mouse's Avatar
    I love trying new devices, that's what led me to WP in the beginning. Now I would never switch back.
    What if one of these new devices was better? Wouldn't you switch then?
    04-20-2014 07:16 PM
  21. anony_mouse's Avatar
    In regard to IE vs Chrome, it's subjective and always will be. Use what you like and be happy.
    But if you have Windows Phone, you can't. You have to use IE. Isn't that incredibly stupid?
    04-20-2014 07:19 PM
  22. m3kk's Avatar
    I hate the new browser update, can't get full screen on any video I try to stream in websites. Only YouTube videos, rest lacks a button. Feels like browsing with my 360 all over again
    04-20-2014 07:23 PM
  23. stkhalo07's Avatar
    But if you have Windows Phone, you can't. You have to use IE. Isn't that incredibly stupid?
    Not necessarily.

    The assumption I think a lot of people make is that WP8 should act like Android, part of which I think comes from the fact, like Android, there's multiple OEMs creating different WP8 devices/products.The problem with that, though, is WP is not Android, nor is it intended to be - it's "locked down" like iOS. That being said, however, it has the benefit of multiple OEMs - like Android - to become a middle ground OS.

    For example, any browser is allowed on WP that a developer wants to create. However, they are required to use the core rendering engine IE uses, just like iOS - because, again, this is not Android (on the software front).

    You can argue the merits of open or closed operating systems all day long, but there's no universal right/wrong. If you feel you should be able to use Chrome, feel free to use Android - like pretty much everything in life there's trade-offs/benefits to everything (which in your case, this would be a benefit of Android). Even if WP opened rendering engines for web browsers, let's be real - Google still wouldn't develop the app.

    You should try Android on a Moto G. Super smooth and much faster than WP. Also, I think fragmentation (ie being used in creative and varied ways) shows just how successful android has been.
    I have used, and currently own, Nexus devices (and several non-Nexus/GPe phones running stock ROMs).

    While they tend to be a lot faster than skinned OSs, I disagree they're quicker than WP.

    Fragmentation doesn't show how successful Android is - activated/sold devices does. Fragmentation, if anything, shows a failure on Android's part to unify their OS and their vendors. The fact that the majority are now on 4.0 + just shows the problem here - 1) there's a large chunk still on pre-ICS/JB, and 2) that even if they're on JB the majority is still 4.1.x variants - showing extreme fragmentation.

    You guys have to realize one of the big benefits to a locked down OS is that WP has been able to almost (some carriers/devices excluded) universally keep WP8 + devices on the same updates, albeit with varying degrees of delivery dates. That's a huge deal in of itself. People tend to use Apple's universal updating of iPhones as the example, but you have to remember: WP has almost been able to do the same, update-after-update, with a slew of devices, from different manufacturers, with different specs - that's a big deal.

    Two of the biggest appeals to the Nexus devices are 1) updates, and 2) the stock ROM. WP has been able to ensure updates for the vast majority of devices/users, while every single phone has the "stock" OS. This means that when you go in and use a 520 it's quick, nimble, and responsive - just like its big brother flagships - all because it's the "stock" WP experience every device has.
    raycpl and Bram Vanroy like this.
    04-20-2014 07:58 PM
  24. A895's Avatar
    Not necessarily.

    The assumption I think a lot of people make is that WP8 should act like Android, part of which I think comes from the fact, like Android, there's multiple OEMs creating different WP8 devices/products.The problem with that, though, is WP is not Android, nor is it intended to be - it's "locked down" like iOS. That being said, however, it has the benefit of multiple OEMs - like Android - to become a middle ground OS.

    For example, any browser is allowed on WP that a developer wants to create. However, they are required to use the core rendering engine IE uses, just like iOS - because, again, this is not Android (on the software front).

    You can argue the merits of open or closed operating systems all day long, but there's no universal right/wrong. If you feel you should be able to use Chrome, feel free to use Android - like pretty much everything in life there's trade-offs/benefits to everything (which in your case, this would be a benefit of Android). Even if WP opened rendering engines for web browsers, let's be real - Google still wouldn't develop the app.



    I have used, and currently own, Nexus devices (and several non-Nexus/GPe phones running stock ROMs).

    While they tend to be a lot faster than skinned OSs, I disagree they're quicker than WP.

    Fragmentation doesn't show how successful Android is - activated/sold devices does. Fragmentation, if anything, shows a failure on Android's part to unify their OS and their vendors. The fact that the majority are now on 4.0 + just shows the problem here - 1) there's a large chunk still on pre-ICS/JB, and 2) that even if they're on JB the majority is still 4.1.x variants - showing extreme fragmentation.

    You guys have to realize one of the big benefits to a locked down OS is that WP has been able to almost (some carriers/devices excluded) universally keep WP8 + devices on the same updates, albeit with varying degrees of delivery dates. That's a huge deal in of itself. People tend to use Apple's universal updating of iPhones as the example, but you have to remember: WP has almost been able to do the same, update-after-update, with a slew of devices, from different manufacturers, with different specs - that's a big deal.

    Two of the biggest appeals to the Nexus devices are 1) updates, and 2) the stock ROM. WP has been able to ensure updates for the vast majority of devices/users, while every single phone has the "stock" OS. This means that when you go in and use a 520 it's quick, nimble, and responsive - just like its big brother flagships - all because it's the "stock" WP experience every device has.
    I so hate the fragmentation argument because how do you think 100s millions of Android devices where a good portion are mid to low range hardware will be able to stay on an update track? And then spread these devices across almost every single country on the planet (even North Korea is making and Android phone) and trying to keep devices updated would cost so much money and time that manufacturers wouldn't be able to make new devices.

    And to add on the fact that majority of devices running android are running 4.0+ is a good thing considering how many devices run Android. The fact that KitKat itself and OS ~6 months old has $4 of Android OS market share shows how Android has changed because it damn sure wouldn't have reached that level 2+ years ago in the same amount of time.

    Also Nexus devices are not the holy grail for Android. They have average/bad cameras and average battery life. If anything GPE devices are some of the best because they have new hardware (HTC M8 GPE) and the latest OS.

    WP is able to do it because they have ~4% market share. Not a good comparison comparing it to 50% marketshare.

    Sent from my XT907 using Mobile Nations mobile app
    04-20-2014 10:26 PM
  25. stkhalo07's Avatar
    I so hate the fragmentation argument because how do you think 100s millions of Android devices where a good portion are mid to low range hardware will be able to stay on an update track? And then spread these devices across almost every single country on the planet (even North Korea is making and Android phone) and trying to keep devices updated would cost so much money and time that manufacturers wouldn't be able to make new devices.

    And to add on the fact that majority of devices running android are running 4.0+ is a good thing considering how many devices run Android. The fact that KitKat itself and OS ~6 months old has $4 of Android OS market share shows how Android has changed because it damn sure wouldn't have reached that level 2+ years ago in the same amount of time.

    Also Nexus devices are not the holy grail for Android. They have average/bad cameras and average battery life. If anything GPE devices are some of the best because they have new hardware (HTC M8 GPE) and the latest OS.

    WP is able to do it because they have ~4% market share. Not a good comparison comparing it to 50% marketshare.

    Sent from my XT907 using Mobile Nations mobile app
    I said before that there are pros and cons to every mobile OS/strategy, and the fragmentation issue is a huge one for Android.

    Regarding your question how I expect so many to stay current, the reality is that there's not hundreds of millions of different models, so the install base argument is fairly moot.

    But regardless, there's definitely a ton of Android models out there, from a wide range of manufacturers. And you mention feasibility, which I think is a fair point - how can we expect all these OEMs to stay current? And the reality is we probably more than likely couldn't, but that's not because of inherent feasibility due to install base/Android, but rather one of the "benefits" of Android being its double-edge sword. The reason keeping these devices up-to-date becomes so difficult is that the vast majority of OEMs use proprietary software skins. Not only do they take up additional space - as well as, more often than not, decreasing system responsiveness - they require updating in addition to the core OS. It's not upgrading the core OS that's the problem here - the GPe and Nexus devices' quick updates indicate how relatively simple core OS updates are directly from Google - it's the skin updates that seals the fate of so many of these handsets - and that's a huge problem.

    I disagree entirely with the 4.0+ being a good indication of progress. ICS was released in October, 2011. The fact that there's so many phones running an OS from 2.5 years ago is a little troubling to say the least. Even 4.1.x, which if I'm not mistaken is still where the biggest core of the Android install base is, was from 2012 - that's all pretty terrible.

    The 4.3/4.4 numbers, albeit low, have been boosted by the 'best' of circumstances - i.e. a brand new Nexus device, the introduction of the GPe line, and Motorolla's non-GPe devices essentially being stock Android with a few additions.

    And I'm not saying Nexus devices are the best of the best, but it's very commonly that the Android community will tell you that the real Android experience can only be found there (or the GPe devices).

    But again, the marketshare argument is moot - WP would more than likely easily able to do the same updating of scale at 50% that they get currently. As I mentioned in both posts, these updates are core OS updates and don't require feasibility studies regarding custom skins; MS hands them the update and they can easily push it to their devices - just the same way the GPe devices quickly update. When all you're focusing on is the core OS, and the company is handing you the update it simplifies things greatly.
    04-20-2014 11:31 PM
218 ... 34567 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Official WP 8.1 release for Verizon?
    By sheldonch in forum Other Operating Systems
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-22-2014, 07:48 AM
  2. Camera/Picture Question (vs Icon)
    By ret18057 in forum Windows Phones
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-21-2014, 05:13 AM
  3. WP 8.1 preview update concerns
    By Dhan117 in forum Other Operating Systems
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-18-2014, 02:01 PM
  4. Guide to what Cortana keeps local vs sends to cloud?
    By RuleOfSines in forum Windows 10
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-17-2014, 11:01 PM
  5. IE pages all of a sudden.
    By jleebiker in forum Other Operating Systems
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-17-2014, 06:34 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD