07-07-2013 02:52 PM
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  1. bilzkh's Avatar
    Android is the most popular because it is what OEMs prefer pushing against the iPhone and other Android competitors. The openness of Android gives OEMs the capability to customize the OS to include their services (e.g. Sony) as well as differentiate from other Android competitors. The problem with Windows Phone is that it is too limited for that sort of customization.

    1. Right away I think Microsoft should open it up to the OEMs, at least the APIs so that OEMs can integrate their key services and innovations more deeply into the OS. If Nokia wants to integrate some brand new thingamajig into the OS, it should be able to do so easily.

    2. It wouldn't be a bad idea to open up more of Windows Phone to the end-user and developers. As small as the so-called 'power user' or 'geek' market might be, it seems they cast a much bigger shadow on perception and reputation. Its geeks who frolic around on forums and message boards, its geeks who sit on podcasts and write reviews, etc. It's high time that Windows Phone (which is based off the NT-kernel no less) take Android on function-for-function. Microsoft can maintain the simplicity of the OS UI by simply relegating all the advanced functions to some "Advanced" tab out-of-way and out-of-sight, thereby ensuring only the power-users/geeks use it, but that normal users aren't overwhelmed.
    thed likes this.
    06-18-2013 12:35 PM
  2. thed's Avatar
    Android is the most popular because it is what OEMs prefer pushing against the iPhone and other Android competitors. The openness of Android gives OEMs the capability to customize the OS to include their services (e.g. Sony) as well as differentiate from other Android competitors. The problem with Windows Phone is that it is too limited for that sort of customization.

    1. Right away I think Microsoft should open it up to the OEMs, at least the APIs so that OEMs can integrate their key services and innovations more deeply into the OS. If Nokia wants to integrate some brand new thingamajig into the OS, it should be able to do so easily.

    2. It wouldn't be a bad idea to open up more of Windows Phone to the end-user and developers. As small as the so-called 'power user' or 'geek' market might be, it seems they cast a much bigger shadow on perception and reputation. Its geeks who frolic around on forums and message boards, its geeks who sit on podcasts and write reviews, etc. It's high time that Windows Phone (which is based off the NT-kernel no less) take Android on function-for-function. Microsoft can maintain the simplicity of the OS UI by simply relegating all the advanced functions to some "Advanced" tab out-of-way and out-of-sight, thereby ensuring only the power-users/geeks use it, but that normal users aren't overwhelmed.
    I agree with this 100%. That's a big strength for Android. I really think that MS would benefit by opening things up a little so devs can fill some missing features that people may want but currently aren't possible to implement. Does that make it possible for rogue apps to screw up your phone? Sure, but that's why app submissions are monitored and tested.
    06-18-2013 01:14 PM
  3. jleebiker's Avatar
    remote controls desktops without 3rd party app on the desktop
    How?
    06-18-2013 02:27 PM
  4. bilzkh's Avatar
    I agree with this 100%. That's a big strength for Android. I really think that MS would benefit by opening things up a little so devs can fill some missing features that people may want but currently aren't possible to implement. Does that make it possible for rogue apps to screw up your phone? Sure, but that's why app submissions are monitored and tested.
    Precisely! Microsoft is just too damn slow to keep up with the pace of the mobile market, it's rarely ever ahead and mostly behind (e.g. Notification Center, wtf!?).

    Just open up the phone and QA the app submissions. Right now Windows Phone has some of the best 3rd party developers I've seen (MetroTube, Instance, Liquid Daffodil apps, WPCentral, etc). Imagine these people putting their energies behind filling in functional gaps as they emerge, and perhaps even pushing WP ahead of the competition!? If MS was as open with WP we'd see an amazing notifications center, crazy NFC-enabled switches/functions, possibly interactive live (or smart?) tiles, wild indie games, new tile themes and colours, etc. This is what WP needs in order to compete in a fast-moving space.
    06-18-2013 04:02 PM
  5. z33dev33l's Avatar
    Some of the "open windows phone up" people fail to grasp why we're not on android. We don't want a slow, inconsistent OS that stutters and requires constant tuning to keep functional. That's what most of us Windows Phone fans escaped coming to the platform and let me tell you, it was a breath of fresh air to have a complete OS. Something I didn't have to modify daily and still have it feel half-assed.
    06-18-2013 04:10 PM
  6. davebolton's Avatar
    I'm confused. How did Microsoft screw their WP customers? Aren't you confusing what Microsoft did (no real upgrade path from WP7 to WP8) versus what the carriers did not do (push updates that Microsoft did create out to early adopters for fear it would compete with new phone sales/upgrades)?
    06-18-2013 04:58 PM
  7. sarlo100's Avatar
    How did Android become the most popular mobile OS? Easy. When Microsoft released WP7, Google was already releasing *Gingerbread*. No matter how good your product is, if you give another guy an 18 month head start as the only alternative in town, he's going to make inroads. In this case, inroads that are going to be really difficult to overcome. Had WP7 come out in 2009, you'd be looking at a completely different marketplace, likely with Apple still dominating the high end, WP in the middle range, and Android confined to the low end - with WP and Android fighting for top market share. Instead, with an 18 month head start, Android and Google, in a sense, Microsofted Microsoft.

    Gates' plan with Windows 3 through 2000 was to get his software running on any PC he could, any way he could. Google returned the favor when they did everything they could to get Android on every conceivable smartphone they could lay hands on. Just as Gates philosophy built the Windows dynasty, Google's has turned the trick with Android.
    Laura Knotek and Ian Too like this.
    06-18-2013 05:04 PM
  8. Ridemyscooter86's Avatar
    Android basically got big because they got there first. Truthfully, no, they didn't get there first as that was really the iphone, but since it was exclusive to att, the only choice for people getting a good smartphone at the time was to switch to ATT and pay the 599$ starting price for the 1st gen iphone or pay the 199$ contract price for the 2nd gen. Either way, it still required you to either go with ATT(if you didn't have it) which would mean most of the time to pay the 400$ fee to abandon your contract. After about I think it was like 6-month to a year, android was out on tmobile, and while it wasn't necessarily a great OS, it was a modern smartphone on a different carrier that could be had for around 200$. Then verizon and then sprint got android phones and it took apple like 4 years to release the iphone on android and then sprint, eventually. It was simply a numbers game, android got on all 4 carriers relatively quickly where apple stayed exclusive to ATT, so they reached a broader audience faster.

    Same story about windows too, microsoft released windows and (IF I remember my history correctly as I was a little kid when this all happened, correct me if I'm wrong), windows didn't start getting really big until windows 3.1 / windows 95, but apples had been out much longer. The difference is MS went with the OEM model which has still been extremely successful to this day: apple made a couple of machines in house with their own OS, where MS let other companies, compaq, IBM, HP, Dell, all sorts of other companies make windows machines and it was simply a numbers game. when you have 10 or more different OEMs making a product vs 1 hardware/software manufacture, you can flood the market with your product. Android is no different, OEM companies like samsung, HTC, LG, Motorola, Sony, all just started making smartphones with android and when they got to all the carriers faster than the iphone did, they just took up the marketshare.

    Unfortunately in the tech world, most widely used != the best product. Most of it comes down to marketing, production, and distribution. Unfortunately, I do like Microsoft's model better than android simply because Open source software leads to natural fragmentation. Android is getting better with it, but the reason windows phone runs so much better is that OEMS can't modify the software, which is a good thing because I have pretty much never seen a hardware company do software better than a software company, the only exception to that might be HTC sense in the beginning of its life, now I wouldn't say that it actually adds to the android user experience, not does any other skin IMHO.
    06-18-2013 06:23 PM
  9. jmshub's Avatar
    Android got the market share they did because the iphone was released in 2007 in the US as an exclusive to the then Cingular Wireless, now at&t wireless. By 2009, Verizon was still on the outside looking in at the first big rush of consumer smart phones. They threw the full weight of their advertising behind "Droid Does". For the next two years, you bought a smart phone at Verizon, it was Android. That gave them the critical mass in the early stages.

    Hardcore fan support is one thing, but a smartphone isn't going to get critical mass until the uneducated or uninterested casual smartphone buyer stops into the mobile store in the mall and starts asking for the phone by name.
    lbaxter and Ian Too like this.
    06-18-2013 07:49 PM
  10. Trehanx12's Avatar
    Android is the most popular because it's the perfect choice for most manufacturers, carriers and users as well. It's open source and fully customizable, this benefits all the three parties I mentioned. Manufacturers can personalize the OS completely and give it their personal stamp to make it different to other phones, carriers can also make some changes and add their own apps in order to differentiate as well, and the users can also customize it and they can also bring unofficial updates to phones that aren't updated by their manufacturers. Another strong point is the apps, it has all the apps and games a user could want and most of them are free, with the option to pay for additional features or removing ads. The OS is available in all kinds of devices: Smartphones, tablets, cameras, music players, etc. at every price point, which makes it the most accessible platform. iOS doesn't have this and Windows Phone is only recently starting to follow this strategy.

    I personally think Android is a good OS, it's not perfect and it has the popular issues like lack of updates from manufacturers, deficient performance in low-end devices and to a lesser extent it also has malware and viruses, but in general it's good and has improved a lot during the last 2 years. If you have Android 4.0 or higher, you can notice that it's a solid OS. It's the most popular mobile OS because even if it's not the best, it has the key point: ACCESSIBILITY. iOS is not accessible at all, it's only designed for high-end purposes, and Windows Phone followed the same route as iOS until recently. I personally think people should give it a break, it gets a lot of hate but it truly is a good OS, I can understand the criticism for low-end devices and have experienced it myself, but it's wonderful in high-end devices like Nexus, Galaxy, etc.
    06-18-2013 09:43 PM
  11. Ridemyscooter86's Avatar
    Android is the most popular because it's the perfect choice for most manufacturers, carriers and users as well. It's open source and fully customizable, this benefits all the three parties I mentioned. Manufacturers can personalize the OS completely and give it their personal stamp to make it different to other phones, carriers can also make some changes and add their own apps in order to differentiate as well, and the users can also customize it and they can also bring unofficial updates to phones that aren't updated by their manufacturers. Another strong point is the apps, it has all the apps and games a user could want and most of them are free, with the option to pay for additional features or removing ads. The OS is available in all kinds of devices: Smartphones, tablets, cameras, music players, etc. at every price point, which makes it the most accessible platform. iOS doesn't have this and Windows Phone is only recently starting to follow this strategy.

    I personally think Android is a good OS, it's not perfect and it has the popular issues like lack of updates from manufacturers, deficient performance in low-end devices and to a lesser extent it also has malware and viruses, but in general it's good and has improved a lot during the last 2 years. If you have Android 4.0 or higher, you can notice that it's a solid OS. It's the most popular mobile OS because even if it's not the best, it has the key point: ACCESSIBILITY. iOS is not accessible at all, it's only designed for high-end purposes, and Windows Phone followed the same route as iOS until recently. I personally think people should give it a break, it gets a lot of hate but it truly is a good OS, I can understand the criticism for low-end devices and have experienced it myself, but it's wonderful in high-end devices like Nexus, Galaxy, etc.
    I've gotta say, I disagree with almost all of your points. First I should preface this by saying that I have thoroughly used android on many different devices and I have many issues with it. I will start off by saying that the nicest thing about android is that you can do the most with it: Since you can root it and the end user can modify it how they see fit, the most can be done with it. Now how you say that Windows Phone and especially iOS aren't accessible is beyond me.

    First you start of saying that manufactures and carrier personalizing the OS is a good thing, and I highly disagree. I have only ever seen one instance where a manufacture had skinned android (sense 1.0-2.0) and it was better than stock android. Other than that, I think all of the other skins, for lack of a better word, are garbage. I mean, take touchwiz for example: I played with the new samsung galaxy note 8.0 recently. I noticed that once in a while it would lag, thats unacceptable for a brand new device running a fairly powerful quad-core exynos processor. Also, I though it was without a doubt the most hacked together user experience I've ever seen: There were 2 app launcher bars, seriously, one on the side and one on the bottom, also, when you hit the buttons on the bottom of the device, it does different things like if you double tap the back button, vs hitting it once, vs holding it down, essentially there were 9 different things you could do from the bottom tablet buttons...Kinda confusing to me. The point I'm trying to make is its the same deal with windows. I have never used a windows computer where I thought any OEM actually added value to the product, I feel whenever they load software, its crap trial versions of products that just get in the way. Thats why every time I buy a windows PC, I re install a fresh version of the OS so I don't have to have a norton window popping up every 5 seconds to remind me that I need to renew my subscription. If I were to every buy another android device, I would only get a nexus as I think stock android is far simpler, faster, and more intuitive than any skin placed on top of it.

    You are right that android has come a long way, and I didn't think android got good, until 4.0, but I still feel it has a very long way to go to get to the same usability as iOS. My experience with android is that apps crashed frequently and even the OS itself crashed a couple of time on me. In the 2 years that I've owned my windows phone, only 1 app has crashed on me a couple of times (spotify for WP7) and the OS has literally NEVER crashed on me, ever. Same with iOS, I can only recall, maybe one time seeing iOS actually crash.

    Now to the accessibility: How is iphone/ipad not accessible? If you're talking about price then I can understand what you're saying in terms of that iOS devices are premium products sold at a premium price, but the OS is dead simple to use, I mean it has one button! iOS is far simpler to use compared to android and is a little simpler to use compare to WP. In any case, both are much more fluid and fast than android is. iOS almost never lags, except for older devices, and I've never had wp lag. As for windows 8: It depends on the hardware..although even the atoms give a pretty smooth user experience.

    Also, with regards to the free app comment: Yes android has many more free apps than WP and iOS, but that means developers also never make the same amount of money. Thats why all developers release for the iphone/ipad first. Yes, you can jailbreak an iphone, and its easy to do, same with rooting an android phone, but if you look at the numbers, people pirate more on android because its easier to do because its open. Yes iOS does have an issue with piracy, but more importantly, its a statistical fact that if you release an app on iOS, it will make more money than android (just google it). Also, its much easier to develop on iOS and WP than android simply because of standardized hardware. Every generation of wp use the same processors/gpus and theres only one current iphone and ipad out at a time vs android.

    I'm not saying android is a bad system, but it does have a ton of issues that other OSes simply don't.
    Laura Knotek, a5cent and Ian Too like this.
    06-19-2013 12:19 AM
  12. nube_android's Avatar
    Some of the "open windows phone up" people fail to grasp why we're not on android. We don't want a slow, inconsistent OS that stutters and requires constant tuning to keep functional. That's what most of us Windows Phone fans escaped coming to the platform and let me tell you, it was a breath of fresh air to have a complete OS. Something I didn't have to modify daily and still have it feel half-assed.
    I think MS could open it up a litttle more, but it doesn't have to be to the extent google does. And part of the reason Android is so inconsistent is that it runs Java.
    Ridemyscooter86 likes this.
    06-19-2013 01:22 AM
  13. cckgz4's Avatar
    Because they are literally available everywhere

    Sent from my LG-E970 using Tapatalk 4 Beta
    06-19-2013 01:31 AM
  14. ammarmalik2011's Avatar
    Well I know it can but you have to kill all processes on Android to have acceptable performance and battery life.
    Which decade are you living in? This issue was almost eliminated from Android in Gingerbread and it's completely non-existant in Android 4 and above. A long time ago in a Galaxy far far away Android had these problems which are now long gone but people just won't stop bringing these up. If you wanna know what battery problems are, just sift through the Lumia 920/HTC 8X forums here.
    06-19-2013 01:35 AM
  15. a5cent's Avatar
    I think MS could open it up a litttle more, but it doesn't have to be to the extent google does. And part of the reason Android is so inconsistent is that it runs Java.
    If you aren't going to define what you mean with "open it up a little more", then that isn't a statement worth making. It means nothing.

    Also, Android is not inconsistent because it uses Java, but because Android doesn't have a UI framework that encourages consistency. Android's UI paradigm is "anything goes", and that can be "achieved" in any programming language. It's actually the easiest kind of UI framework to make, because it passes all responsibility for consistency from the framework designer, to the devs making apps with that framework.
    FinancialP likes this.
    06-19-2013 01:38 AM
  16. Rico's Avatar
    Which decade are you living in? This issue was almost eliminated from Android in Gingerbread and it's completely non-existant in Android 4 and above. A long time ago in a Galaxy far far away Android had these problems which are now long gone but people just won't stop bringing these up. If you wanna know what battery problems are, just sift through the Lumia 920/HTC 8X forums here.
    I would say battery problems were reduced around the time of ICS, but that was also in part due to OEMs putting larger batteries in their devices. Speaking as a lead tech in a Sprint indirect, a large percentage of the issues I see daily are Android devices with battery issues. When you remove service issues from the equation, you have crappy OEM and carrier software which introduces instability, and can increase battery drain. There's also the fact apps can run as they like in the background. While it's great for realtime performance, it can really drain the battery. Combine that with the fact that there's far less regulation in apps on Android than Windows Phone (poorly-coded apps can kill battery), and the fact that very few people are running Jellybean on their devices. The battery issue on Android is better than it's been, but hardly "completely non-existant".

    My first Lumia 920 had a bum battery. Replaced it and I've never had an issue since. I run a rooted Galaxy Nexus as my work phone, and even with an extended battery, I get maybe half a work day with it running the same email accounts, social networks, and similar apps (Reddit, eBay, Instagram) with notifications and both Bluetooth and WiFi on compared to a full work day on my Lumia 920. And this is with Find My Phone on. Hardly scientific, but in daily usage for me Windows Phone has much better battery life than Android; I'd put my battery life on my 920 around where my iPhone 4s was.
    lbaxter and Laura Knotek like this.
    06-19-2013 04:53 AM
  17. o0Nighthawk0o's Avatar
    How?
    Personally, I use this one. Remote Desktop | Windows Phone Apps+Games Store (United States)

    Costs $1.99 but some of the others that use RDP to connect are much more expensive and the free ones have desktop software that has to be installed. The only problem I found with what I use is name resolution. At home it doesn't resolve the host name to an IP address but works fine at work.
    06-19-2013 06:25 AM
  18. o0Nighthawk0o's Avatar
    I think I would rather see MS keep the OS closed simply for the security. There is enough running on my phone as is without having to add something else because some people want to tinker.

    My phone is a tool. It helps me keep in touch with family, friends and clients. It helps me keep track of expenses. Empresses clients when I can repair their computer from anywhere in the world while on the phone with them.
    06-19-2013 06:49 AM
  19. WorzelGummage's Avatar
    I mean, take touchwiz for example: I played with the new samsung galaxy note 8.0 recently. I noticed that once in a while it would lag, thats unacceptable for a brand new device running a fairly powerful quad-core exynos processor. Also, I though it was without a doubt the most hacked together user experience I've ever seen: There were 2 app launcher bars, seriously, one on the side and one on the bottom,


    . Thats why all developers release for the iphone/ipad first. Also, its much easier to develop on iOS and WP than android simply because of standardized hardware. Every generation of wp use the same processors/gpus and theres only one current iphone and ipad out at a time vs android.

    I'm not saying android is a bad system, but it does have a ton of issues that other OSes simply don't.
    The app launcher on the side is the new "Multi-Window" feature that allows you to have two apps displayed and running simultaneously on the home screen.

    ALL developers most certainly DO NOT release apps for the iPhone/iPad first. There are apps that are released for Android and WP and are not available for iOS.
    06-19-2013 02:21 PM
  20. Agent-P's Avatar
    Because they are literally available everywhere

    Sent from my LG-E970 using Tapatalk 4 Beta
    This. It isn't so much the OS, but rather the market saturation. Android literally has a device that could cater to any type of person. Want a phone with a small screen? Done. Want a phone with a gigantic screen? Done. Want a phone that's super cheap to buy outright? Done. Want a particular screen resolution? They all exist on some device or another. Nokia has realised this and that's why they are aiming to have devices at every price point, different sizes, and different features to cater to the different needs of people.
    cckgz4 likes this.
    06-19-2013 02:34 PM
  21. chezm's Avatar
    Which decade are you living in? This issue was almost eliminated from Android in Gingerbread and it's completely non-existant in Android 4 and above. A long time ago in a Galaxy far far away Android had these problems which are now long gone but people just won't stop bringing these up. If you wanna know what battery problems are, just sift through the Lumia 920/HTC 8X forums here.
    My gs3 was running 4.1 and I still had to kill some google specific processes to stop hindering the device. Definitely 920 isn't void of battery inconsistency, but at least my Lumia can run LTE without eating 25% per hour. And my 1gb ram smartphone runs lighting speeds faster than device with 2gb ram, at idle using 700mb minimum.
    06-19-2013 06:50 PM
  22. scottcraft's Avatar
    The simple answer is more apps, better functionality and brand recognition. Windows phone has a solid base, but the two androids in my house are just as reliable if not more so than the three windows phones I've owned while having more apps and more features. Also I don't do anything special to manage the running apps on my android either. It has horrible battery life, but so does my 8X. I will say the 8X is more efficient, but it's a long way from good. Microsoft has a solid platform, I hope they speed up the rate at which they add new features to windows phone, it really has so much potential.
    06-19-2013 07:11 PM
  23. z33dev33l's Avatar
    The simple answer is more apps, better functionality and brand recognition. Windows phone has a solid base, but the two androids in my house are just as reliable if not more so than the three windows phones I've owned while having more apps and more features. Also I don't do anything special to manage the running apps on my android either. It has horrible battery life, but so does my 8X. I will say the 8X is more efficient, but it's a long way from good. Microsoft has a solid platform, I hope they speed up the rate at which they add new features to windows phone, it really has so much potential.
    More functionality, far from better.
    06-19-2013 07:18 PM
  24. scottcraft's Avatar
    More functionality, far from better.
    Whether it's better or not is certainly subjective, but regardless android offers more features at this time. And I'm not including the gimmicky Galaxy wave your hand at the phone stuff. I don't think Microsoft needs to make windows phone capable of everything android can do. It's the simple things for me such as a notification center, separate volume profiles and screen rotation lock. Windows Phone already offers more options for sharing things than the iPhone, so all it really needs is refinement in certain areas.
    06-19-2013 07:29 PM
  25. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    It's all subjective, really. There is no "best" mobile OS, there is only "best for me".

    My problem is I can see the unique benefits of each of the 4 major platforms (iOS, Android, Windows Phone, BB10) and I wish I could combine them all into one super device. But alas, I must try to decide which one is the best for me and go with that.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    06-19-2013 08:20 PM
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