11-15-2014 04:19 AM
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  1. akthelonelyman's Avatar
    Because its almost like a Mini pc... With a powerful device like NOTE u get all sorts of features.. Almost all apps which are regularly updated, then software features like outstanding file manager, and features like usb otg, sometimes even hdmi support. So basically it becomes a pc of sorts.
    And lets be honest majority dont care whether google is harvesting their private data or not.
    Personally I'm happy with my 1520 and I have problem with Google's privacy policy.
    But I will after that note3/4 is superior in many ways
    10-29-2014 09:58 AM
  2. heickelrrx's Avatar
    Because its almost like a Mini pc... With a powerful device like NOTE u get all sorts of features.. Almost all apps which are regularly updated, then software features like outstanding file manager, and features like usb otg, sometimes even hdmi support. So basically it becomes a pc of sorts.
    And lets be honest majority dont care whether google is harvesting their private data or not.
    Personally I'm happy with my 1520 and I have problem with Google's privacy policy.
    But I will after that note3/4 is superior in many ways
    Nope.
    It's about trend dude like other just make something different and people will go for it
    colinkiama likes this.
    10-29-2014 10:00 AM
  3. akthelonelyman's Avatar
    Nope.
    It's about trend dude like other just make something different and people will go for it
    Ok...DUDE...
    10-29-2014 10:01 AM
  4. Ian Too's Avatar
    Thanks for your post, though as a attempt at demoralising the WP community it won't be very effective.

    Certainly in terms of market share, Android has won, but that has very little to do with quality and features of the OS. It will take years of concerted effort by Microsoft and its partners to eat into that market share, but it is important that they make that commitment for the sake of smart phone users worldwide.

    Android got its market dominance for two reasons: because it's free and because Apple and Microsoft ceded the smart phone market to them. At no point has Android approached the polish, security and reliability of iOS. If Apple had licensed iOS to other manufacturers then there would have been no Android, because HTC, Sony and other OEMs would have had an alternative. Similarly, had Microsoft had Windows Phone 7 ready two years earlier, companies like HTC, who had grown up making Windows Mobile devices, would have had a natural progression into the smart phone market and wouldn't have needed Android. For these oversights, I award Apple and Microsoft two great big wooden spoons. :P

    My main problem with Android centers around the topic of security and your points in this area really disqualify you as a critical thinker. You've clearly swallowed the Google cool aid.

    The encryption you point to has been implemented after it was pointed out that reseting Android devices only deletes the directory tree, leaving the files readable by anyone with a PC and the right software. I hope you've never passed on sensitive information to anyone nefarious through eBay, but I guarantee some people have suffered identity theft by passing their old device on, even if they have avoided malware while they actually owned the device.

    Whats more, there is a pattern in how Google responds to criticism which reveals how completely irresponsible a company they are. When this was revealed, Google's first response was to advise people to turn on encryption before resetting the device - transferring the problem to users who cannot be expected to have the technical knowledge. I know because, as the local goto guy for technical things, I've done this for about ten Android users and had to explain why. Then Google implement the feature and expect kudos for doing so, despite leaving hundreds of millions of Android users in the cold and blissfully unaware of the danger they are in.

    A similar situation recently cropped up when it was pointed out that the standard ASOP browser was subject to a zero day exploit, where a script could be used to glean sensitive information from the device. Google advised users to download Chrome - it's own product - and pointed out that the latest version of Kit -Kat was not subject to the flaw. At no point does Google feel they have to do anything themselves to protect its billions of users from a flaw they are responsible for.

    Only in Android fan boy land is this sort of behaviour considered adequate and only the uncritical would laud Google for responding retroactively to its own negligence without patching vulnerable devices already in circulation. You should be asking yourself what exploits you are currently subject to and will never be protected from.

    I have another problem with your post; in that you are presenting your own experience as representative of Android use in general when your are clearly both affluent enough to buy a high-end device and have enough technical knowledge to effectively customize it. For you, Android probably is the best smart phone to buy, assuming you don't mind the intrusiveness of Google itself.

    I'd be very surprised if your experience was representative of anything more than half a percent of Android users. Most Android users actually end up with whatever the person in the phone shop or their carrier is currently pushing and this leads to instances such as the one I ran into three times within one week; twice with Samsung Galaxy Aces and once with an HTC Desire: All three users had installed a micro SD card and all three had installed Whatsapp on their devices before getting low memory warnings having installed their second app. Yes, that's what I said, low memory warnings after installing their second app.

    In what fantasy land is that adequate?

    This is the reason I always advise people on a budget to get a Windows Phone: I'm confident it's the right choice for them and that Windows Phone is better than Android for the VAST majority of users. Whats more, the comparison between the HTC One for Android and HTC One for Windows shows that this superiority is inherent to Windows Phone.

    The fact the Android has such a large market share is not good news for the vast majority of people, who would be better off with in a closed ecosystem run by a company which doesn't leave them out in the cold, which presents them with a consistent experience and protects their personal information without using it to profile them for advertising.

    From where I'm sitting, you are a credulous apologist for an insecure, inferior operating system only suitable for tech-loving geeks and just to finish, here is the latest security flaw in Android. This should be enough for even you.
    10-29-2014 10:13 AM
  5. gapost's Avatar
    There's no doubt that Android has security and privacy issues. I don't like that at all. But when you compare the technology, apps, and innovations of android phones, it's very hard for most people to resist. Personally, I can live with a WP, but right now, I'm trying out an android just to see what's on the other side of the fence. It's a pain in the but to turn off and disable a lot of the android junk and try to get Microsoft stuff working good on android, but I'm giving it a shot. Still, I hope that WP and Verizon can improve, but especially for Verizon, it's seems to be unlikely.
    10-29-2014 10:27 AM
  6. EC Translating Services's Avatar
    - Security: Google has beefed up security as well with out of the box encryption(not on Windows Phone) and they've also enabled some other things(which I don't fully understand) such as Selinux(or whatever it's called). Me and a lot of other Android users have never experienced malware, but this just breathes in a lot more confidence.

    - Issues with Google Services: There are people here that believe Google is a spying company and Microsoft are angels, we'll people like you are offered with the same Microsoft services you would find on Windows Phone(sometimes even better!). You can completely replace any and all Google services.
    I may overall agree on the whole post except these two items.
    a) It's not completely true that Google has "beefed up security". It has simply activated by default what was already there. The rest of ecosystem is still as exposed as it was.
    b) Google services. I think most people know that both Microsoft and Google (And Facebook and Twitter and Yahoo and Skype and.......fill the blanks with any US based service) spy on users. However Google has 3 peculiarities people keep pretending to forget or ignore.
    Google thrives on ads and on your data. Taking your data is the toll you pay to have a "free system". 2) There is a reasonable amount of doubt among certain institutions around the world that data flowing through Google servers (we're authorized to think the same about Microsoft) may go straight to the next level where they are stored in non Google databases and then used when needed by other parties (NSA first in line). 3) For those who didn't get it, Google is trying (or is already) to become a US Military supplier (drones, robots and else). In this perspective, any "official" claim of safety vis-a-vis safety (meant as safety from government and non government entities) is totally void. Google is inherently unsafer than WP is, by which margin i don't know. The safest OS is the one that has to come and is not US made, with non US-made hardware, in factories where none of the employees belong to any of the 5 eyes countries.
    Till that happens, there isn't safe phone whatsoever. You don't have a choice between being spied or not. You only have a choice about whom you want to be spied from, US, China or thirds or a bit of all. Based on what you install on your mobile. Do you like Skype? well your chats and videos are being recorded for the benefit of the US government. Do you like WeChat? Be ready to confess your sins to China.

    That is the reality. There isn't any other reality! Google is the unsafest platform Ever (because we have to consider the whole platform not the single service).
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    10-29-2014 11:06 AM
  7. Bodeanicus's Avatar
    Which the average consumer cannot enable from their phone. Fail.
    10-29-2014 01:04 PM
  8. Bodeanicus's Avatar
    How about deleting IE and Bing from Windows Phone?
    10-29-2014 01:06 PM
  9. o0Nighthawk0o's Avatar
    Yup, there is a reason you don't see Android devices used in the enterprise. Security being the biggest factor. I know where I work there are NO Android devices at all except for personal devices and those don't connect to our network. Where my wife works, they have instructions for setting up the company's email for iPhone and Windows Phone. Android is specifically barred from doing this.

    The mobile device of choice has been Apple but that is changing. We are experimenting with Windows tablets and so far everyone loves them. They play nice with our network, our VPN is native to Windows (no app needed), runs the same software as our desktops and simple to use. iPhones and iPads cannot do this without jumping through major hoops. I expect all of this interoperability to only get better with Windows 10.
    10-29-2014 01:09 PM
  10. thesachd's Avatar
    The point of this thread or why I said Android has "won" was because of the massive progress that Android has been making.

    About an year back, or even more recently, there we're quite a few features that Windows Phone had but Android didn't. For example; low end devices that performed well, a more advanced camera API and possibly a better design(which was arguable). I'm pretty sure that there we're more things in the list.

    But compared to what Android offered, even back then, Windows Phone never stood a chance. I mean Windows Phone has been playing catch up for as long as I can remember; it took Windows Phone about 4 years to get a decent notification system, and over 2/3 years to get gesture typing and power toggles. And until recently there was no easy way to close apps from multitasking! And there's lots more.

    Android had a rough history with performance and security. Because of the first part(performance) Windows Phone was getting a lead, selling a huge amount of Lumia 520s in many places. But with the arrival of KitKat, Moto E and G, and the Android One project Android has once again secured it's place in both the low end, mid range and high end.

    http://www.androidcentral.com/androi...hone-tumble-us

    I mean people here at WPCentral we're like Android isn't experiencing much growth anymore, and Windows Phone will beat Android(and other such stuff). But according to statistics posted today, Android despite already having huge marketshare gained 4.5 % market share in the US, that is something that is huge!

    Moving onto security, and the NSA-Google relation that someone may have mentioned, you should know that Microsoft and NSA have also worked together so no one is safe from the NSA. But at least Google is taking steps to ensure some level of security(out of the box encryption).

    And Android is also doing stuff about malware: http://bgr.com/2014/10/29/android-5-0-lollipop-feature/

    And about security: http://bgr.com/2014/10/28/android-5-...urity-hackers/

    And personally I've used Metro UI, Material Design is miles superior in both performance, for content viewing and being colourful.

    Android has done everything to resolve any criticism that it faced from consumers and competition alike, and I see barely any reasons for why Android could be regarded as below Windows Phone, it never was and continues to beat Windows Phone.

    The rapid progress that Android is making is making Android users extremely happy and at the same time making Windows Phone users less and less to complain about.

    Why I say that Android has "won" because for the forseeable future, I don't see Windows Phone beating in marketshare or applications or performance or much of anything.

    And many if you that say "if iOS had done that...Android wouldn't have been popular" or "if Microsoft had done that...Android wouldn't be popular", we'll Apple and Microsoft could've done whatever they wanted because possibilities are endless, but in the end Android did come into existence and is possibly the most popular mobile OS out there.
    10-29-2014 01:22 PM
  11. Bodeanicus's Avatar
    Thanks for your post, though as a attempt at demoralising the WP community it won't be very effective.

    Certainly in terms of market share, Android has won, but that has very little to do with quality and features of the OS. It will take years of concerted effort by Microsoft and its partners to eat into that market share, but it is important that they make that commitment for the sake of smart phone users worldwide.

    Android got its market dominance for two reasons: because it's free and because Apple and Microsoft ceded the smart phone market to them. At no point has Android approached the polish, security and reliability of iOS. If Apple had licensed iOS to other manufacturers then there would have been no Android, because HTC, Sony and other OEMs would have had an alternative. Similarly, had Microsoft had Windows Phone 7 ready two years earlier, companies like HTC, who had grown up making Windows Mobile devices, would have had a natural progression into the smart phone market and wouldn't have needed Android. For these oversights, I award Apple and Microsoft two great big wooden spoons. :P

    My main problem with Android centers around the topic of security and your points in this area really disqualify you as a critical thinker. You've clearly swallowed the Google cool aid.

    The encryption you point to has been implemented after it was pointed out that reseting Android devices only deletes the directory tree, leaving the files readable by anyone with a PC and the right software. I hope you've never passed on sensitive information to anyone nefarious through eBay, but I guarantee some people have suffered identity theft by passing their old device on, even if they have avoided malware while they actually owned the device.

    Whats more, there is a pattern in how Google responds to criticism which reveals how completely irresponsible a company they are. When this was revealed, Google's first response was to advise people to turn on encryption before resetting the device - transferring the problem to users who cannot be expected to have the technical knowledge. I know because, as the local goto guy for technical things, I've done this for about ten Android users and had to explain why. Then Google implement the feature and expect kudos for doing so, despite leaving hundreds of millions of Android users in the cold and blissfully unaware of the danger they are in.

    A similar situation recently cropped up when it was pointed out that the standard ASOP browser was subject to a zero day exploit, where a script could be used to glean sensitive information from the device. Google advised users to download Chrome - it's own product - and pointed out that the latest version of Kit -Kat was not subject to the flaw. At no point does Google feel they have to do anything themselves to protect its billions of users from a flaw they are responsible for.

    Only in Android fan boy land is this sort of behaviour considered adequate and only the uncritical would laud Google for responding retroactively to its own negligence without patching vulnerable devices already in circulation. You should be asking yourself what exploits you are currently subject to and will never be protected from.

    I have another problem with your post; in that you are presenting your own experience as representative of Android use in general when your are clearly both affluent enough to buy a high-end device and have enough technical knowledge to effectively customize it. For you, Android probably is the best smart phone to buy, assuming you don't mind the intrusiveness of Google itself.

    I'd be very surprised if your experience was representative of anything more than half a percent of Android users. Most Android users actually end up with whatever the person in the phone shop or their carrier is currently pushing and this leads to instances such as the one I ran into three times within one week; twice with Samsung Galaxy Aces and once with an HTC Desire: All three users had installed a micro SD card and all three had installed Whatsapp on their devices before getting low memory warnings having installed their second app. Yes, that's what I said, low memory warnings after installing their second app.

    In what fantasy land is that adequate?

    This is the reason I always advise people on a budget to get a Windows Phone: I'm confident it's the right choice for them and that Windows Phone is better than Android for the VAST majority of users. Whats more, the comparison between the HTC One for Android and HTC One for Windows shows that this superiority is inherent to Windows Phone.

    The fact the Android has such a large market share is not good news for the vast majority of people, who would be better off with in a closed ecosystem run by a company which doesn't leave them out in the cold, which presents them with a consistent experience and protects their personal information without using it to profile them for advertising.

    From where I'm sitting, you are a credulous apologist for an insecure, inferior operating system only suitable for tech-loving geeks and just to finish, here is the latest security flaw in Android. This should be enough for even you.
    Just had to get that bit of condescension in there at the end, didn't ya? Tell me, where can I turn on the encryption in the settings on my Windows Phone, again?
    10-29-2014 01:25 PM
  12. Bodeanicus's Avatar
    Won what?
    Mobile. It's over. The only reason Apple's still in the game is because they were first, and frankly, their product kicks the **** out of most of their competitor's phones.
    10-29-2014 07:04 PM
  13. heickelrrx's Avatar
    Just had to get that bit of condescension in there at the end, didn't ya? Tell me, where can I turn on the encryption in the settings on my Windows Phone, again?
    I tthink it's always turned on ._.
    10-29-2014 08:02 PM
  14. Bodeanicus's Avatar
    I tthink it's always turned on ._.
    Not if you don't have access to an Exchange server, it isn't.
    10-29-2014 10:49 PM
  15. TechAbstract's Avatar
    "Yup, there is a reason you don't see Android devices used in the enterprise. Security being the biggest factor. I know where I work there are NO Android devices at all except for personal devices and those don't connect to our network. Where my wife works, they have instructions for setting up the company's email for iPhone and Windows Phone. Android is specifically barred from doing this.

    The mobile device of choice has been Apple but that is changing. We are experimenting with Windows tablets and so far everyone loves them. They play nice with our network, our VPN is native to Windows (no app needed), runs the same software as our desktops and simple to use. iPhones and iPads cannot do this without jumping through major hoops. I expect all of this interoperability to only get better with Windows 10. "

    Android is a mess in enterprise. Be ready to write 100 different guides for Android to set up email because Android phones have different UI from phone to phone. I work in IT and we try to not deal with smartphones as much as possible. Android dominance is not good. Hopefully that will change with Windows 10.
    Last edited by TechAbstract; 10-29-2014 at 11:21 PM.
    10-29-2014 11:09 PM
  16. BobLobIaw's Avatar
    Mobile. It's over. The only reason Apple's still in the game is because they were first, and frankly, their product kicks the **** out of most of their competitor's phones.
    Read Jeff Bezos' comments about Amazon. He is smart enough to observe that no company has ever remained on top. Nothing's ever "over" in business, and the only constant is change. Your comment is really just addressing the current landscape, which has very limited usefulness.
    10-30-2014 12:47 AM
  17. EC Translating Services's Avatar
    "there is a reason you don't see Android devices used in the enterprise. Security being the biggest factor. I know where I work there are NO Android devices at all except for personal devices and those don't connect to our network. Where my wife works, they have instructions for setting up the company's email for iPhone and Windows Phone. Android is specifically barred from doing this."

    Exactly so! Same in the case of many of my major customers for translations (and forbidden usage of any cloud service, like in ANY whatsoever).
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    10-30-2014 05:24 AM
  18. mohit9206's Avatar
    I am currently on stock Android 4.4.4 KitKat on my Moto E and previously used Lumia 520 with WP8.I cant say for sure that either OS is better than the other in every aspect.Some things are better in android while some were better in wp8.So for me it really comes down to hardware choice. Choosing which OS to use is easy but choosing which phone to buy is much more difficult task.There are only 3 major OS while hundreds of different phones to choose from.I think its about time manufacturers start offering phones equipped with both Android and WP.
    10-30-2014 07:24 AM
  19. Ian Too's Avatar
    Just had to get that bit of condescension in there at the end, didn't ya? Tell me, where can I turn on the encryption in the settings on my Windows Phone, again?
    Personally, I would like to see Microsoft enable encryption on Windows Phone and in fact I think all files and transfers of data should be encrypted.

    However, don't forget how we got here: Android's nasty little habit of only deleting the directory tree when the device is reset and Google's negligence in leaving hundreds of millions of Android users blissfully unaware of the necessity of encrypting the contents of their phones.

    Windows Phone however, doesn't suffer this flaw. When a Windows Phone is reset, personal files are deleted before the directory tree goes the same way.

    Also, I can say with confidence that should a security flaw be discovered in Windows Phone 8, Microsoft will incorporate a fix into a future update which everyone should get. No one is left in the cold, unaware of a problem with their device as all those who own all but the very latest Samsung Galaxies, etc currently are.

    What you are suffering is called cognitive dissonance - that feeling you get when you've committed yourself to a point of view, but now feel the weight of evidence pressing against you. It's how you could ignore everything in my post and whine about a bit of condescension you've read into the end of it.

    I don't feel condescension to Android fan boys, I feel unalloyed contempt. Contempt for idiots who try to weigh market share or feature sets against over three years of damn near perfect service - ignoring the gaping security holes in their system of choice. Idiots who feel having their movements tracked is a worthwhile price to pay for free email. Idiots who trust a company which treats their personal information as a resource, instead of a sacred trust.

    I don't go looking for Android flaws to crow about, they come to me uninvited, which means there must be more that don't come my way and when I think about my friends and family who use these devices, it makes me shudder to think of all the s*$t I'm going to have to help clear up.

    So, if you're the tech-savvy person who can afford a Nexus and can customise it, and know how to avoid malware, good luck to you. I'm glad your happy and I'm sure you've bought the best device for YOU. But when it comes to your mum and dad, to your less knowledgeable friends and work colleagues who wouldn't know how to choose between a Moto E or a Desire: tell them to get a Lumia. Just buy the one which best fits their wallet, because they'll all give a consistent experience, all run loads of apps and all keep their precious, private information safe. They're all easy to use and will be updated with new features and firmware patches to keep them secure.

    And when you've matured to the point where the device isn't a plaything, but something you need to work, Windows Phone will be there for you too.
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    10-30-2014 07:57 AM
  20. chezm's Avatar
    So, if you're the tech-savvy person who can afford a Nexus and can customise it, and know how to avoid malware, good luck to you. I'm glad your happy and I'm sure you've bought the best device for YOU. But when it comes to your mum and dad, to your less knowledgeable friends and work colleagues who wouldn't know how to choose between a Moto E or a Desire: tell them to get a Lumia. Just buy the one which best fits their wallet, because they'll all give a consistent experience, all run loads of apps and all keep their precious, private information safe. They're all easy to use and will be updated with new features and firmware patches to keep them secure.

    And when you've matured to the point where the device isn't a plaything, but something you need to work, Windows Phone will be there for you too.
    Of all the writing you've spewed on this thread, the bold statement I agree with...expect for going straight for the Lumia but to offer benefits of all the options. Android is definitely the less secure option between WP and Android, I can disagree at all but some of the lengths you've gone to are far fetched...and no i dont feel like going through each point and wasting an hour with examples. You can be condescending (yes you have been, even if you believe you haven't...although you do have a right in some cases as the points raised about Android's defense are false as well).

    Your underlined statement was true with WP8, but 8.1 not so much as there have been many reports of inconsistencies such as my own personal experience and the many others reported on this site. Sure its an easy to use platform (although theres a learning curve, like new type of OS) but its firmware patching is slow and offers very minor changes usually...but ensures security.

    As for your last statement, maybe in your personal experience but I had so many issues with my L920 and L1020 "just working" that it drove me up the wall. Notifications inconsistently working, tons of freezing and black screens, battery draining unnecessarily fast (and not having the appropriate tools to identify the cause, Battery Saver helps a bit here but its lacking DETAILS), sometimes to dial a call it takes up to 1 minute, with the exact sim card in my nexus 5 within 5 seconds, green screen camera requiring a reboot, Not able to save certain file types of emails (example MP3 or WAV, being a musician on the side this is a big deal)...I could think of a few more but will stop. This is not to say Android is free of its own problems, but stop pretending that WP is.
    10-30-2014 10:54 AM
  21. farhanmariz's Avatar
    Looking forward for this upgrade for my Nexus 7. But truthfully, if Google doesn't shove its services into your throat, I'd like them better.
    10-30-2014 11:59 AM
  22. Ian Too's Avatar
    My critique is not at all far-fetched:

    i). ASOP Browser Flaw

    ii). Android Reset Flaw

    I have posted these links before, so didn't think it necessary to repeat myself, but there are none so deaf as those who don't want to listen.

    It is however, very clear from these instances that consumer privacy and security were not a central consideration when Android was designed and that security improvements have only been implemented in response to public criticism.

    Similarly, Samsung's new Knox is rendered useless because user's PIN is stored in plain text on the device.

    It makes me wonder what new flaw is yet to be revealed and what advice I'm going to have to give to friends and work colleagues who have bought devices in good faith. The last one had me explaining what a web browser was and before it was a directory tree.

    By contrast, Windows Phone had security and customer privacy built in from day one and despite tens of millions of users worldwide, Windows Phone has suffered no serious security breaches. In fact I can think of only one - where a text message could be used to wipe the device - and that cause no loss of customer data, only inconvenience.

    For me, security and privacy aren't options. There's no combination of hardware or features which can compensate for poor security, because the cost of identity theft can be catastrophic.

    Everything in the Windows Phone world doesn't have to be rosey for it to be a better option, because from a security point of view, Android is one unmitigated disaster.

    And if all that wasn't enough, I'll leave you with a new one.
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    10-31-2014 03:24 PM
  23. thesachd's Avatar
    My critique is not at all far-fetched:

    i). ASOP Browser Flaw

    ii). Android Reset Flaw

    I have posted these links before, so didn't think it necessary to repeat myself, but there are none so deaf as those who don't want to listen.

    It is however, very clear from these instances that consumer privacy and security were not a central consideration when Android was designed and that security improvements have only been implemented in response to public criticism.

    Similarly, Samsung's new Knox is rendered useless because user's PIN is stored in plain text on the device.

    It makes me wonder what new flaw is yet to be revealed and what advice I'm going to have to give to friends and work colleagues who have bought devices in good faith. The last one had me explaining what a web browser was and before it was a directory tree.

    By contrast, Windows Phone had security and customer privacy built in from day one and despite tens of millions of users worldwide, Windows Phone has suffered no serious security breaches. In fact I can think of only one - where a text message could be used to wipe the device - and that cause no loss of customer data, only inconvenience.

    For me, security and privacy aren't options. There's no combination of hardware or features which can compensate for poor security, because the cost of identity theft can be catastrophic.

    Everything in the Windows Phone world doesn't have to be rosey for it to be a better option, because from a security point of view, Android is one unmitigated disaster.

    And if all that wasn't enough, I'll leave you with a new one.
    As far as the first article goes about an insecurity with the AOSP browser it was ditched in favour of Chrome quite a few years back. Complaining about a virus/malware/etc on something like the abandoned AOSP browser is equivalent to crying over your Windows XP getting a virus and blaming Microsoft(which have already abandoned the software).

    Secondly about the factory reset flaw, it's something that even exists on other platforms and I'm pretty sure it's on Windows Phone as well(but non one probably cared to try it out).

    You could greatly benefit from reading on about what happens to deleted files and the data that is "deleted":



    Lastly whatever you say about Samsung isn't representative of all of Android, those are flaws affecting "Samsung" devices, not all of Android.
    11-01-2014 02:30 AM
  24. Visa Declined's Avatar
    I like mobile phones
    11-01-2014 06:13 AM
  25. jonnaver's Avatar
    Because apps.
    11-01-2014 08:55 PM
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