12-07-2014 10:01 AM
94 1234
tools
  1. theefman's Avatar
    Mary Jo Foley's article is telling. If she is getting the same abandonment vibe we "moaners" are getting it speaks volumes about how WP is being perceived in the minds of consumers and tech media. And even if Windows 10 brings a better version of Office (doubtful) we are looking at many more months of negativity for WP as a platform. In that climate how will developers and consumers react? Will they still see WP as an attractive platform to move to?

    Intangibles like this coupled with the ever present lack of apps and new exciting hardware may have a bigger detrimental effect than perhaps Microsoft is expecting. And then again as I personally think, maybe they just don't give a toss anymore and are quite content to let ios and android serve as their mobile platforms while they remain dominant in desktop computing.

    One thing is clear, even though their current ios/android first strategy may be good for their services, no matter how the spin doctors try to tell it, its not good for WP as a platform or Microsoft's mobile tablet plans. Guess we'll see if Windows 10 truly will be the "savior" of WP or finally confirm it as a footnote in smartphone history.
    11-13-2014 01:23 PM
  2. Gustavo Sanchez's Avatar
    I guess W10 will be MS's last chance at redemption, at least for me. If I don't get a 1020 successor soon after Win10 is released, I guess it's back to Android then. And it will be MS's loss, not mine.
    11-13-2014 01:50 PM
  3. matt john2's Avatar
    I guess W10 will be MS's last chance at redemption, at least for me. If I don't get a 1020 successor soon after Win10 is released, I guess it's back to Android then. And it will be MS's loss, not mine.
    I second it if they fail me one more time with windows 10 guess I give Sony a change
    11-13-2014 02:07 PM
  4. steve_w_7's Avatar
    Feel free to buy your Android and iSheep phones then and move on.

    These forums will have less moaners and more constructive conversations.

    Bye... And close the door on the way out.
    Is this your idea of a constructive conversation? @RichardBurt is quite the Windows Phone evangelist.
    11-13-2014 03:56 PM
  5. Squachy's Avatar
    Actually, If I'm not mistaken, the earlier versions for office mobile was a whole lot better with more features then the current bare bones striped down version we have today. I remember myself thinking when using office, " couldn't I do... before? Why can't I find those feature anymore?" Then it hits me... Wait, they are missing. I mean, sure, you want people to subscribe to office 365. But wasn't one of the appeal of getting a windows phone the fact that we got to use a fairly feature rich (not expecting the desktop version, but basic stuff like alignment would be nice) office app that other platform had to pay for? Wasn't the point, use a windows phone to get excess to windows services?
    The only thing i remember them doing with the ONE update it ever had was remove support for
    .doc documents so you could only open .docx
    11-13-2014 04:12 PM
  6. Squachy's Avatar
    Wait for 7.5
    Wait for 7.8
    Wait for 8.0
    Wait for 8.1
    Wait for 10
    8.0 was supposed to be the savior from which 7 started, But it didn't do anything. 8.1 was supposed to be the savior because of 'blue' and the 'Ecosystem' with ties to windows 8.1.....nope. Now 10 is the holy grail.......

    At least they skipped 9, there's one less hope to get crushed.
    neo158 likes this.
    11-13-2014 04:19 PM
  7. L Beezy's Avatar
    When you make apps that perform better and are more feature-rich on other mobile OSs than your own WP platform, that should speak volumes on what you feel about your own platform...at least, that's how I see it. If anything, WP users should at least have the same exact experience. It feels like W10 is just an excuse to deter this fact. Sure, what if W10 will bring the best experience? What about the time being? It seems like Microsoft is making moves right now that are counterproductive and downright destructive to WP.

    But hey, I'm just a WP user and not a CEO running a multi-billion dollar company. I may not be qualified to make these kind of statements as I don't know about the business model of Microsoft. I am, however, a WP user who is feeling like I am getting the short end of the stick.

    BTW, I'm never loyal to any brand for reasons like this. Once I feel WP is no longer for me, I'll move on to another OS...always been like this. I'm very familiar with all three and am not afraid to go and purchase what I believe will benefit me best.
    Last edited by L Beezy; 11-13-2014 at 05:18 PM.
    tgp, steve_w_7 and RobinPaul like this.
    11-13-2014 04:28 PM
  8. jmshub's Avatar
    8.0 was supposed to be the savior from which 7 started, But it didn't do anything. 8.1 was supposed to be the savior because of 'blue' and the 'Ecosystem' with ties to windows 8.1.....nope. Now 10 is the holy grail.......

    At least they skipped 9, there's one less hope to get crushed.
    To listen to this sounds like Microsoft isn't adding any value to their updates. Every update since Windows Phone 7 was launched has added functionality, and has moved the platform forward. It's not like the OS isn't progressing. User demands are moving forward at a pace that is at least as fast as progress on each iteration of Windows Phone. What feature have you been waiting for since 2010, the launch of WP7?
    Al4video, Hoekie and a5cent like this.
    11-13-2014 04:33 PM
  9. theefman's Avatar
    What feature have you been waiting for since 2010, the launch of WP7?
    The ability to attach documents and files apart from pictures to a replied email. Editing a forwarded email. Sending pictures at full resolution via email. (Kind of strange such functionality is missing yet Microsoft touts the platform as enterprise friendly when its got one of the least functional email clients imaginable.)

    Proper backup and restore functionality
    Smart dialing (available in Windows Mobile)
    eMike, jwinch2, dgr_874 and 1 others like this.
    11-13-2014 04:38 PM
  10. eMike's Avatar
    The mantra remains for fans as always.Wait for it. Something big will be coming. Wait. Wait. Wait. Soon. Mango, Apollo, Blue, Threshold. When will Microsoft go all in?
    Patience game. I like how you doin it, MS.
    Last edited by em1ke; 11-14-2014 at 03:20 AM.
    11-13-2014 05:57 PM
  11. Greywolf1967's Avatar
    First let me lay out a few thoughts........

    It is close to impossible to bring new users to Windows Phone because the mass thinking on Windows Phone is there is a huge "App Gap". This is not the truth but can we as Windows Phone "moaners" fix this thinking of the people.......No

    Can we as Windows Phone "moaners" fix the lack of knowledge of the sales people in the carrier stores and box stores that Windows Phone is a very good Mobile OS.......No

    Should someone have raised questions, made complaints, caused a fuss, twisted their knickers when Blackberry started their down hill slide into history as a viable Mobile OS......Oh hell Yes !!!!

    Guess what....when the normally Windows Friendly press start to raise questions about how the very people who are holding Windows up, are being treated, or how they see the perception of Windows users is starting to change to an Unfriendly mood.......someone in the seat of power should maybe take a look.

    Microsoft was so pleased with itself when it hit 3%...so much so it let loose with Tee shirts saying "We are the 3%". Well that was short lived. after some of the moves they have made. Last I heard it fell back to a 2.5% Market share, and who knows what it will be come Christmas 2014....with no Flagship to offer shoppers.....
    Icon.....under a year old and retired
    928.....Good but still on the shelf to long.
    M8.... Still a good phone, with some neat offerings like the cover.
    1520..Yes a good Phone, but not for the average user as 6" isn't everyone's cup of tea.

    Maybe if the users of Blackberry has staged a protest or caused a huge fuss when the slide started Blackberry would still be in the mobile phone game, and not looking at how to become a Cloud based company of "services". My case and point is the Blackberry Passport..........really??????? What 10 year old was let loose with the Flat Lego set on that design???
    Where will the Last of The Bold and Fire users go when their phone give up the ghost...........Android and iOS more then likely.

    Microsoft should be looking hard at keeping the very people they have now, not always asking them to wait....wait....soon....soon.

    If we wait any longer, Microsoft will become Cloud Only rather then Mobile First, Cloud First.
    jwinch2, theefman and steve_w_7 like this.
    11-13-2014 10:28 PM
  12. Keith Wallace's Avatar
    At this point Ms is likely gearing up for win10 so any WP efforts would be focused towards that.
    And that's is a horrendous way to work. The real issue is the crap hardware they keep pushing out, because it leaves early WP8 adopters wanting, when considering upgrade options. Microsoft cannot gain mobile traction with this moronic strategy of rebooting every 2 years. Windows Phone 7 had its limitations, so I could accept that transition to make Windows Phone 8 devices support better hardware and updates long-term. However, Microsoft is ignoring the majority of the U.S. customer base by throwing nothing but low-end phones out for emerging markets, and it's going to chase the high-end customers (where margins are likely higher per-device) to the competition. I mean, it's outright pathetic that my contract ended almost a week ago (I've been eligible to upgrade via Next for months, as well), and there isn't even a trustworthy rumor as to what I can replace my Lumia 920 with in the next several months.

    I don't like the ignoring of the OS, but I HATE the ignoring of the customers. Windows 10 phones won't sell for jack if Microsoft makes this conscious decision to stop producing quality devices, which makes potential customers ignore the platform, and makes current customers disgusted with the support and longevity offered by Microsoft.
    theefman and steve_w_7 like this.
    11-13-2014 10:44 PM
  13. jwinch2's Avatar
    8.0 was supposed to be the savior from which 7 started, But it didn't do anything. 8.1 was supposed to be the savior because of 'blue' and the 'Ecosystem' with ties to windows 8.1.....nope. Now 10 is the holy grail.......

    At least they skipped 9, there's one less hope to get crushed.
    I have actually been quite pleased with 8.1 from the get go. There have been a few too many issues reported, but thankfully I have not really had problems myself. My concern is the attention devoted to other platforms at the expense of their own. You put your time and money into those things which are important to you. For MS, both are functions of employee tasking. It is quite obvious based upon what we have seen that MS is not as concerned with improving the WP experience as they are in getting their services to people on android and iphone.
    11-13-2014 11:20 PM
  14. kristalsoldier's Avatar
    First let me lay out a few thoughts........

    It is close to impossible to bring new users to Windows Phone because the mass thinking on Windows Phone is there is a huge "App Gap". This is not the truth but can we as Windows Phone "moaners" fix this thinking of the people.......No

    Can we as Windows Phone "moaners" fix the lack of knowledge of the sales people in the carrier stores and box stores that Windows Phone is a very good Mobile OS.......No

    Should someone have raised questions, made complaints, caused a fuss, twisted their knickers when Blackberry started their down hill slide into history as a viable Mobile OS......Oh hell Yes !!!!

    Guess what....when the normally Windows Friendly press start to raise questions about how the very people who are holding Windows up, are being treated, or how they see the perception of Windows users is starting to change to an Unfriendly mood.......someone in the seat of power should maybe take a look.

    Microsoft was so pleased with itself when it hit 3%...so much so it let loose with Tee shirts saying "We are the 3%". Well that was short lived. after some of the moves they have made. Last I heard it fell back to a 2.5% Market share, and who knows what it will be come Christmas 2014....with no Flagship to offer shoppers.....
    Icon.....under a year old and retired
    928.....Good but still on the shelf to long.
    M8.... Still a good phone, with some neat offerings like the cover.
    1520..Yes a good Phone, but not for the average user as 6" isn't everyone's cup of tea.

    Maybe if the users of Blackberry has staged a protest or caused a huge fuss when the slide started Blackberry would still be in the mobile phone game, and not looking at how to become a Cloud based company of "services". My case and point is the Blackberry Passport..........really??????? What 10 year old was let loose with the Flat Lego set on that design???
    Where will the Last of The Bold and Fire users go when their phone give up the ghost...........Android and iOS more then likely.

    Microsoft should be looking hard at keeping the very people they have now, not always asking them to wait....wait....soon....soon.

    If we wait any longer, Microsoft will become Cloud Only rather then Mobile First, Cloud First.
    Recently, the MS CEO has gone on record to say that what he means by "mobile first" is not hardware specific. He considered MS and its products to be what he calls "enablers" on any OS platform that will enable users to do what they want to do. He has, in the same interview, gone on to say that the specificity of the hardware is not a high priority (or something to that effect) in the current and emergent scheme of things in MS. This was in an interview he gave either in the UK or to some UK media houses. I'll try and find the appropriate link (I think Thurrott mentioned this on his blog). I must say that when I read this, I was disappointed having just bought the Nokia 830!!!! In effect, what I understood the MS CEO was saying that it did not matter what platform I am on, as long as I used MS services, he (and MS) was OK with it. If that is so, then why would I compromise with a sub-par App Store with Windows Phone. I'd rather buy an iOS or Android phone and benefit not only from the much richer App Stores that each of those platforms have but also be able to us the core MS apps that I need for my day to day work. I am not quite sure what else to make of the MS CEO's words.

    Edit: The only way that I have been able to justify the Nokia 830 purchase which will now have to last me till Oct. 2015 (unless I drop it and break it irreparably) is that it is the last of the Nokia hardware and as such, it is very good. It is extremely well made and in that sense I am very happy with it. But as we all know, the hardware is only 50% of the story. I will have to most likely look elsewhere for the rest 50% of the story (the app and eco-system). By the time I am ready to buy a new phone, hopefully Windows 10 would have been released and the MS posture - at least in the mobile phone space - would have become much clearer than what it is today.
    dgr_874 and Gustavo Sanchez like this.
    11-13-2014 11:20 PM
  15. GoNokindow's Avatar
    What features were those? I admit I don't use Office a great deal on my phone except to view things, so there might be things I overlooked. I certainly don't recall any user comments/complaints regarding removed functionality for Office Mobile.
    To be quite honest. I really don't remember anymore. It was quite some time ago. What i do remember was thinking that after the update there were some things missing, like certain editing i couldn't do anymore. I know its not really a solid answer. I couldn't put my finger on it too back then. Who knows... Maybe its all in my head. Maybe I'm just going crazy from all this waiting?! Lol.
    Last edited by GoNokindow; 11-14-2014 at 03:45 AM.
    11-14-2014 03:32 AM
  16. kristalsoldier's Avatar
    OK. So here is a bit more of an explanation (and eventual rationalization). First, take a look at this:

    In an appearance at an annual luncheon at the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce—which was nicely transcribed by Geekwire's Todd Bishop, thank you very much—Mr. Nadella was asked what he was doing to improve Windows Phone's market share, which is in the very low single digits and shows no signs of improving anytime soon.

    Nadella didn't talk about "making the market" for Windows Phone. He didn't explain that many new hardware partners have signed on with Windows Phone thanks to "zero dollar" licensing in 2014, and that their devices would improve matters. He didn't vaguely speak of future synergies between Windows Phone and "big" Windows. Instead, he offered up a surprising response.

    He said that Windows Phone's market share doesn't matter.

    He said that Microsoft's broader goal is to deliver productivity experiences across all of the devices that people use. That you will find "Microsoft icons"—i.e. apps—on any phone. The goal, he said, was to ensure that platforms like Office, Skype, and others are broadly available everywhere.
    Source: Satya Nadella Explains the "Mobile" in "Mobile First, Cloud First" | Mobile content from Windows IT Pro

    Thurrott then goes on to quote the MS CEO:

    Devices and device sizes will come and go, even within a single year, you will be changing multiple phones," he said. "It's more about the mobility. In fact, if there's anything central to our vision, it's don't think of the device at the center, think of the individual, the people at the center. And then have the platforms and productivity experiences get built with that at the center.

    So you will have many devices, you will have small devices, large devices, and devices that have not yet been created that will come in time. But what's going to be the constant? Your digital memories, your productivity experiences across all of those devices. That's really the center of how we think about innovating today and into the future.

    And also we are very grounded on this cross-platform world. One of the things that you'll find is Microsoft icons on any phone—irrespective of whether it's a Windows Phone or not. That's our core goal: Things like Office, things like Skype are broadly available
    Source: Same as above.

    If you stop for a moment to think about it, it would appear that the MS CEO is trying to take MS back to its roots, that is, to be a pure software company. Just think about that for a minute. In the PC space, MS did not (and does not) care whether you use a ThinkPad or an Acer or a Dell or an Asus. They are simply interested in what drives the hardware, which is Windows.

    The dominance that MS experienced in the PC space could not be replicated in the mobile space for a variety of reasons. One of these reasons was the complacency that had set into MS as a company. The mobile space posed (and continues to pose) a strategic problem for MS. First, they don't have the command over the space as they did (and arguably continue to do) in the PC space. Second, with Apple and Android focusing on apps and alternate distribution channels for apps, MS suddenly found themselves caught on the wrong foot on two counts - first, they did not have an adequate (some would argue, relevant) OS and second, they had no apps. Their attempt to shoehorn an existing OS (Windows CE, I think it was at one point) as a mobile OS was a disaster when they were suddenly confronted by Apple with iOS and later by Google with Android. Suddenly, MS found themselves losing the battle for mindshare - mind you, mindshare because in the enterprise space, no one could (and still can) challenge MS.

    Then came a couple of disastrous decisions. First, the powers that be at MS decided that to make its presence felt in the mobile space a hardware component was necessary. And since MS is not strapped for cash, they hunted down Nokia. Now they had a hardware capability. Second, MS decided on developing a mobile OS. In my opinion, the second decision was better than the first because if they could convince their partner OEMS that they (MS) would bear the development costs for a mobile OS, then pushing out the OS through those OEMs would make a difference. But there were a number of preconditions (some of which MS has only lately recognized). The first of these was the decision to give away the OS (which they have effectively done now). In this they took a page out of Google's book. Same principle, but executed differently. But having invested in a hardware capability and probably driven by the need to show a positive ROI, they had to push their own hardware. This was and remains a problem. Why? Because MS hardware is an in-house product and carries with it significant prestige value. An alternative would have been to treat the Nokia acquisition as being a co-incidental event and a platform simply to showcase the OS and to produce limited reference designs (again, this is a Google model with the acquisition of Motorola). In addition to this, they could have used Nokia patents to augment the capabilities of their partner OEMs (for a fee, of course). But MS did not choose this option. As a consequence, they built up a small and dedicated fan following (me included) but they also attracted the attention of tech pundits and bloggers who have been less than kind to them and the negative fallout has also had an effect.

    As all this was going on, MS found (and finds) that their original PC model of having their software on a wide variety OEMs was falling by the wayside in the mobile space. Recall the "devices and services" mantra? That was the last rallying cry for justifying the Nokia acquisition and for the Surface line (which at that time was seriously floundering). Then comes Satya Nadella who probably - with a lot of help from the MS board - decides to take MS back to its roots. And what are those roots? Have MS software on every platform possible. Nadella understands that the mobile space is an expanding one and it will be so in the foreseeable future. He wants MS software on all devices that are populating this space. In this scheme of things, Windows Phone is actually irrelevant (as the text of his interview suggests). Thus, the push to have the cutting edge MS apps on the dominant platform. In effect, MS is not playing the mobile hardware game, but they are playing the mobile game. Thus the current mantra "cloud first, mobile first".

    Two questions remain: (1) What about the Surface line? And (2) what about Windows 10?

    The Surface - particularly, the SP3 - will probably serve as a reference design and a platform to showcase cutting edge MS apps. It will also be a niche product - both in the consumer and enterprise space, but it will not take on the role of a being a critical product in MS' scheme of things. Windows 10 has, in my opinion, a dual purpose - (1) to transform the hitherto PC-centric mindset of the enterprise and consumer space (this is, to put it tongue-in-cheek, MS' "transformational" gambit) and (2) if MS continues to give away its mobile OS freely to its partner OEMs, then we can expect the mobile component of Windows 10 to also be given away for free. By doing this MS opens up a one-half front war in the mobile space - the half front is a defensive war that MS is (or will wage). This will involve a mobile-oriented OS which it will give away for free to its OEM partners. The full front is an offensive war where MS will attempt to dominate the application market (in a targeted way) across platforms.

    Where does this leave the small group of Windows Mobile OS enthusiasts like me/ us? Nowhere really. I'd like to sue MS for wasting my money on two generations of phones - the latest being the 830. My only consolation is that the 830 is the swan song of an excellent hardware company (Nokia) and for me that is important. But come October, if what I have written above holds true, I will be looking at some other eco-system (or maybe not).

    My apologies for this very long post!
    steve_w_7, josh715m and a5cent like this.
    11-14-2014 08:30 AM
  17. Greywolf1967's Avatar
    OK. So here is a bit more of an explanation (and eventual rationalization). First, take a look at this:



    Source: Satya Nadella Explains the "Mobile" in "Mobile First, Cloud First" | Mobile content from Windows IT Pro

    Thurrott then goes on to quote the MS CEO:



    Source: Same as above.

    If you stop for a moment to think about it, it would appear that the MS CEO is trying to take MS back to its roots, that is, to be a pure software company. Just think about that for a minute. In the PC space, MS did not (and does not) care whether you use a ThinkPad or an Acer or a Dell or an Asus. They are simply interested in what drives the hardware, which is Windows.

    The dominance that MS experienced in the PC space could not be replicated in the mobile space for a variety of reasons. One of these reasons was the complacency that had set into MS as a company. The mobile space posed (and continues to pose) a strategic problem for MS. First, they don't have the command over the space as they did (and arguably continue to do) in the PC space. Second, with Apple and Android focusing on apps and alternate distribution channels for apps, MS suddenly found themselves caught on the wrong foot on two counts - first, they did not have an adequate (some would argue, relevant) OS and second, they had no apps. Their attempt to shoehorn an existing OS (Windows CE, I think it was at one point) as a mobile OS was a disaster when they were suddenly confronted by Apple with iOS and later by Google with Android. Suddenly, MS found themselves losing the battle for mindshare - mind you, mindshare because in the enterprise space, no one could (and still can) challenge MS.

    Then came a couple of disastrous decisions. First, the powers that be at MS decided that to make its presence felt in the mobile space a hardware component was necessary. And since MS is not strapped for cash, they hunted down Nokia. Now they had a hardware capability. Second, MS decided on developing a mobile OS. In my opinion, the second decision was better than the first because if they could convince their partner OEMS that they (MS) would bear the development costs for a mobile OS, then pushing out the OS through those OEMs would make a difference. But there were a number of preconditions (some of which MS has only lately recognized). The first of these was the decision to give away the OS (which they have effectively done now). In this they took a page out of Google's book. Same principle, but executed differently. But having invested in a hardware capability and probably driven by the need to show a positive ROI, they had to push their own hardware. This was and remains a problem. Why? Because MS hardware is an in-house product and carries with it significant prestige value. An alternative would have been to treat the Nokia acquisition as being a co-incidental event and a platform simply to showcase the OS and to produce limited reference designs (again, this is a Google model with the acquisition of Motorola). In addition to this, they could have used Nokia patents to augment the capabilities of their partner OEMs (for a fee, of course). But MS did not choose this option. As a consequence, they built up a small and dedicated fan following (me included) but they also attracted the attention of tech pundits and bloggers who have been less than kind to them and the negative fallout has also had an effect.

    As all this was going on, MS found (and finds) that their original PC model of having their software on a wide variety OEMs was falling by the wayside in the mobile space. Recall the "devices and services" mantra? That was the last rallying cry for justifying the Nokia acquisition and for the Surface line (which at that time was seriously floundering). Then comes Satya Nadella who probably - with a lot of help from the MS board - decides to take MS back to its roots. And what are those roots? Have MS software on every platform possible. Nadella understands that the mobile space is an expanding one and it will be so in the foreseeable future. He wants MS software on all devices that are populating this space. In this scheme of things, Windows Phone is actually irrelevant (as the text of his interview suggests). Thus, the push to have the cutting edge MS apps on the dominant platform. In effect, MS is not playing the mobile hardware game, but they are playing the mobile game. Thus the current mantra "cloud first, mobile first".

    Two questions remain: (1) What about the Surface line? And (2) what about Windows 10?

    The Surface - particularly, the SP3 - will probably serve as a reference design and a platform to showcase cutting edge MS apps. It will also be a niche product - both in the consumer and enterprise space, but it will not take on the role of a being a critical product in MS' scheme of things. Windows 10 has, in my opinion, a dual purpose - (1) to transform the hitherto PC-centric mindset of the enterprise and consumer space (this is, to put it tongue-in-cheek, MS' "transformational" gambit) and (2) if MS continues to give away its mobile OS freely to its partner OEMs, then we can expect the mobile component of Windows 10 to also be given away for free. By doing this MS opens up a one-half front war in the mobile space - the half front is a defensive war that MS is (or will wage). This will involve a mobile-oriented OS which it will give away for free to its OEM partners. The full front is an offensive war where MS will attempt to dominate the application market (in a targeted way) across platforms.

    Where does this leave the small group of Windows Mobile OS enthusiasts like me/ us? Nowhere really. I'd like to sue MS for wasting my money on two generations of phones - the latest being the 830. My only consolation is that the 830 is the swan song of an excellent hardware company (Nokia) and for me that is important. But come October, if what I have written above holds true, I will be looking at some other eco-system (or maybe not).

    My apologies for this very long post!

    Let me sum it up like this............

    If indeed The Windows Phone User is not the important thing to Microsoft, again The Windows Phone user takes a slap in the face.

    I am not someone who buys my phones on Contract.....I pay my money out right and up front. So this way of thinking is troublesome to me !!!!

    I have been slapped in the face now by Microsoft a few times, and I am almost about to stop being the battered spouse here!!!!!

    I have money to spend on my Toys and I normally like to stay loyal to my brands, but if Microsoft does not want my money, then I am sure Samsung can enjoy it should I dump my full Eco system for all Android.

    ! Game PC ( Windows 7)
    1 Net-top ( Windows 8.1)
    2 Tablets 8.1 and a Surface RT
    1 Nokia Lumia 1020

    As I have now stopped playing Diablo 3 I could switch the Game Rig for a Quad-core Android Mini PC tp use on my 37" TV. The Net-top can be replaced with a Chromebook and the Tablets switched for Samsung Android Tablets....an 8" Galaxy Note is looking nice.

    I could also replace the 1020 with a Galaxy Note 3 and be done with Microsoft and it's services as well.

    I could also dump my Xbox 360 and go back to my Dreamcast or maybe a Wii U.

    As I am not a person who needs office, I could get by using Polaris Office on the mobile devices.

    There is no Microsoft Service I would need to keep.

    So if others like myself walk away, we walk away fully, not half way.....so how does that help the business model then?
    Last edited by Greywolf1967; 11-14-2014 at 11:41 AM.
    steve_w_7 likes this.
    11-14-2014 09:39 AM
  18. kristalsoldier's Avatar
    @Greywolf1967...

    I empathize. But the fact remains that - and here I am assuming that Thurrott is reporting this accurately and the quote id a direct quote - when seen from MS' point of view, conceptually, the strategy makes sense.

    Of course, to us Windows Phone users, it is - as you put it - a slap in the face.

    Take me for example, My 830 is barely a week old (like you I always buy my phones off contract and only sign up for a 11-month SIM-only contract) and I was just at the local Apple store checking out the iPhone 6 Plus. I have no intention of scrapping my use of MS services and apps. But I can sure as hell access those services through the apps that MS is making available via the two dominant platforms. So, lets say I dump MS phone hardware. And, lets also assume that all of the 3% of mobile phone users also dump MS hardware (and that of their OEMs), what really is the loss to MS? 3% of the market? And, what do they retain and/ or get in return? Access to 97% of the mobile market.

    My only question in all of this is how the hell is MS planning to monetize this in the long run? Today the apps and services are free, but they can't be free for ever. So, where is the cash going to come from? To say that MS will rely on the Enterprise segment to fund this would be unsatisfactory. So, the question stands - where is MS planning to fund this "cloud first, mobile first" strategy? Google has its advert revenues. Apple gets its funds from its (overpriced) hardware (Gosh!! In the UK the larger of the two iPhones costs just 250 less than the rent I pay for my apartment!!!! and it can actually pay for a return economy-class air ticket to Asia!!!!). So, where is MS getting the money from (or, where will they get their money from in the future)?
    neo158 and a5cent like this.
    11-14-2014 12:00 PM
  19. fatclue_98's Avatar
    To the OP, you may not like where MS is going but apparently investors do. Insider trading is illegal, wink wink, but it seems that people with more money than me know what direction MS is taking and they seem fine with it. For the last time, for the VERY last time, Microsoft is not in the position to appease to a user base that constitutes only +/- 3% of the market. They will hone their craft and offer their services for the 97%. That be where the money be. It's not a difficult concept to comprehend.

    Let's put it another way. Microsoft released Windows Phone in 2010 to a less than enthusiastic public. There were plenty of reviews touting what it could and could not do, yet people bought them. This was not an invitation-only situation where you didn't know what you were getting until the device landed in your hands. If the device did not suit your needs, why did you purchase it? You don't buy something based on speculation of what could happen, you go on the here and now. That's no different than marrying a skinny chick and hoping she'll get a boob job and some buttocks implants.
    11-14-2014 12:29 PM
  20. Ruined's Avatar
    I am the OP, and I am not a moaner. I have bought five different WP phones, dammit! I just want WP to be not just a "me, too" platform, but a credible alternative to the iOS/Android experiences.

    If by raising the flag on the shortcomings of the WP platform you are criticizing me, then you make my point even more valid.
    Windows Phone had Office exclusively for *years* while iOS/Android had absolutely *nothing.* So now you want to jump ship because you don't have the latest and greatest for 6 months until Win10 comes out when once again WP will get the goods? Silly argument IMO, and the article you linked is similarly short-sighted from a traditionally anti-WP website.
    11-14-2014 12:30 PM
  21. Greywolf1967's Avatar
    @Greywolf1967...

    I empathize. But the fact remains that - and here I am assuming that Thurrott is reporting this accurately and the quote id a direct quote - when seen from MS' point of view, conceptually, the strategy makes sense.

    Of course, to us Windows Phone users, it is - as you put it - a slap in the face.

    Take me for example, My 830 is barely a week old (like you I always buy my phones off contract and only sign up for a 11-month SIM-only contract) and I was just at the local Apple store checking out the iPhone 6 Plus. I have no intention of scrapping my use of MS services and apps. But I can sure as hell access those services through the apps that MS is making available via the two dominant platforms. So, lets say I dump MS phone hardware. And, lets also assume that all of the 3% of mobile phone users also dump MS hardware (and that of their OEMs), what really is the loss to MS? 3% of the market? And, what do they retain and/ or get in return? Access to 97% of the mobile market.

    My only question in all of this is how the hell is MS planning to monetize this in the long run? Today the apps and services are free, but they can't be free for ever. So, where is the cash going to come from? To say that MS will rely on the Enterprise segment to fund this would be unsatisfactory. So, the question stands - where is MS planning to fund this "cloud first, mobile first" strategy? Google has its advert revenues. Apple gets its funds from its (overpriced) hardware (Gosh!! In the UK the larger of the two iPhones costs just 250 less than the rent I pay for my apartment!!!! and it can actually pay for a return economy-class air ticket to Asia!!!!). So, where is MS getting the money from (or, where will they get their money from in the future)?
    From ads that will appear in future updates to apps, plus the sales of data collected from services. In other words what Google does so well now.

    I don't have an issue with iPhone/Android getting Microsoft apps, heck who knows maybe in the long run some will come over.

    I do have an issue with the other platforms getting the new Touch Friendly app before the Windows Platform sees anything.

    It would be the same if Ford sold millions of Mustangs then went back and improved the Motor to double it's HP, but then told Mustang owners, just wait a bit, as we want to put the new Motors in Chrysler/GM cars first, but don't worry yours is coming just wait.

    Ford would be dead in the water, and would never be able to sell another car again.
    neo158 likes this.
    11-14-2014 12:32 PM
  22. neo158's Avatar
    The only thing i remember them doing with the ONE update it ever had was remove support for
    .doc documents so you could only open .docx
    Still can't edit .docx files with special formatting and still can't edit password protected files.
    11-14-2014 12:51 PM
  23. neo158's Avatar
    Windows Phone had Office exclusively for *years* while iOS/Android had absolutely *nothing.* So now you want to jump ship because you don't have the latest and greatest for 6 months until Win10 comes out when once again WP will get the goods? Silly argument IMO, and the article you linked is similarly short-sighted from a traditionally anti-WP website.
    Actually you're wrong, iOS has iWork and Android has Docs, Sheets and Slides so, no they haven't had "absolutely *nothing.*"
    11-14-2014 12:53 PM
  24. Jas00555's Avatar
    Actually you're wrong, iOS has iWork and Android has Docs, Sheets and Slides so, no they haven't had "absolutely *nothing.*"
    I think we can all agree that Docs and iWork might as well be nothing ;p
    11-14-2014 12:57 PM
  25. neo158's Avatar
    To the OP, you may not like where MS is going but apparently investors do. Insider trading is illegal, wink wink, but it seems that people with more money than me know what direction MS is taking and they seem fine with it. For the last time, for the VERY last time, Microsoft is not in the position to appease to a user base that constitutes only +/- 3% of the market. They will hone their craft and offer their services for the 97%. That be where the money be. It's not a difficult concept to comprehend.

    Let's put it another way. Microsoft released Windows Phone in 2010 to a less than enthusiastic public. There were plenty of reviews touting what it could and could not do, yet people bought them. This was not an invitation-only situation where you didn't know what you were getting until the device landed in your hands. If the device did not suit your needs, why did you purchase it? You don't buy something based on speculation of what could happen, you go on the here and now. That's no different than marrying a skinny chick and hoping she'll get a boob job and some buttocks implants.
    The problem is that with no focus on the ~3% it just won't grow so, yes they are in a position to and if fact NEED to appease that ~3% in order to gain any significant market share. It's perfectly fine to have your services on ALL platforms but when that is at the expense of your own platform then that's a problem.

    My point is that most of the ~3% won't wait indefinitely so it's all well and good saying wait for Windows 10 but what happens if it doesn't deliver?
    11-14-2014 01:02 PM
94 1234

Similar Threads

  1. How long is MS going to make us wait for Lumia Camera?
    By Ryan Burke in forum Nokia Lumia 830
    Replies: 194
    Last Post: 01-22-2015, 05:49 AM
  2. Is there any app to share files through wifi?
    By Windows Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-13-2014, 12:47 AM
  3. Is screen calibration there in nokia lumia 520?
    By Windows Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-13-2014, 09:19 AM
  4. Why isn't my Touch working properly?
    By Windows Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-13-2014, 01:29 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD