1. panchoroms's Avatar
    I have read that this Windows S its the windows RT ongoing but whats is the target of this OS?
    I mean its focused on Students or general market?
    05-28-2017 05:21 PM
  2. kaktus1389's Avatar
    I have read that this Windows S its the windows RT ongoing but whats is the target of this OS?
    I mean its focused on Students or general market?
    The only thing that is present in Windows 10 S and was present in Windows RT is only the fact that you can only install apps from the Store. Windows RT only supported certain type of apps - those that were made to run on ARM processors (same processor tech used for phones) and it failed. Windows 10 S supports Windows Universal Apps and also Apps from the Store that are just ported desktop PC apps (Win32 - made for x86/x64 CPU architectures), so you can for example run Call of Duty Infinite Warfare or say Adobe Photoshop from Windows Store on Windows 10 S machines, but you can't install Steam on them. If it was ported to Store however, then you would be able to install it.

    Another thing that Windows 10 S features is speed, security and the OS itself is more battery efficient because it doesn't run traditional Win32 apps.

    Hope I didn't confuse you even more.

    P.S.: Yes, it is upgradable to Windows 10 Pro.
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-28-2017 05:41 PM
  3. davidhk129's Avatar
    I have read that this Windows S its the windows RT ongoing but whats is the target of this OS?
    I mean its focused on Students or general market?
    If you have time, have a look at this posted by Microsoft :

    Windows 10 S FAQ
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-28-2017 05:54 PM
  4. ghese's Avatar
    The target is obviously huge installments and computer labs. It's easy and fast to install. Boots up faster and has Access to all the basic functionality you'd need from a PC that you wouldn't have Access to install Your own stuff on either way.

    Schools that offer Laptops to high School student, would obviously prefer this. Less hackability, less problems, less prone to viruses and so on.
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-28-2017 07:08 PM
  5. k1s23's Avatar
    The target is obviously huge installments and computer labs. It's easy and fast to install. Boots up faster and has Access to all the basic functionality you'd need from a PC that you wouldn't have Access to install Your own stuff on either way.

    Schools that offer Laptops to high School student, would obviously prefer this. Less hackability, less problems, less prone to viruses and so on.
    true. when deploying a large amount of electronics at once like at computer labs or offering computers to students, maintenance (including setting up the computer and security) becomes harder and more time consuming to deal with. with a more locked down but still windows 10 environment like windows 10 s it makes maintenance for administrators much easier to deal with, which is great considering sometimes hundreds or even thousands of computers are bought at once.
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-28-2017 08:18 PM
  6. Timbre70's Avatar
    It's a eunuch's os, but with ability to revert to a proper os unlike rt.
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-28-2017 08:33 PM
  7. Jeffery Holderness's Avatar
    Windows 10 S can't install applications from anything but the store. Like people have said. But you get better battery life, safer internet browsing and more.
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-29-2017 12:40 AM
  8. ZvjerOPC's Avatar
    How do I get Windows 10 S? I want to install it to my mothers' laptop instead of current Windows 10 Pro.
    panchoroms likes this.
    05-31-2017 02:58 PM
  9. davidhk129's Avatar
    How do I get Windows 10 S? I want to install it to my mothers' laptop instead of current Windows 10 Pro.
    We cannot buy Windows 10 S software separately and install it into our computers.

    As of now, the only way to get Windows 10 S is to buy a computer pre-installed with Win 10 S.
    05-31-2017 03:53 PM
  10. davidhk129's Avatar
    Thanks, that was very useful , actually being upgradable its an advantage!
    Just one point regarding " being upgradable "..........
    Upgrading a Win 10 S to Win 10 Pro is ONE WAY.
    Once it is upgraded to Pro edition, it can NOT be switched back to S edition.
    panchoroms likes this.
    06-06-2017 02:01 PM
  11. panchoroms's Avatar
    Just one point regarding " being upgradable "..........
    Upgrading a Win 10 S to Win 10 Pro is ONE WAY.
    Once it is upgraded to Pro edition, it can NOT be switched back to S edition.
    got it
    06-06-2017 02:08 PM
  12. panchoroms's Avatar
    How do I get Windows 10 S? I want to install it to my mothers' laptop instead of current Windows 10 Pro.
    Why would you even want to do that? I rather prefer windows 10 pro over the s version, i get that its more fast and secure, but theres not a huge difference on that matter i think
    06-06-2017 02:09 PM
  13. panchoroms's Avatar
    If you have time, have a look at this posted by Microsoft :

    Windows 10 S FAQ
    Thanks!
    06-06-2017 02:10 PM
  14. panchoroms's Avatar
    The target is obviously huge installments and computer labs. It's easy and fast to install. Boots up faster and has Access to all the basic functionality you'd need from a PC that you wouldn't have Access to install Your own stuff on either way.

    Schools that offer Laptops to high School student, would obviously prefer this. Less hackability, less problems, less prone to viruses and so on.
    It make sense, mostly by being more secure against hackers
    06-06-2017 02:15 PM
  15. panchoroms's Avatar
    The only thing that is present in Windows 10 S and was present in Windows RT is only the fact that you can only install apps from the Store. Windows RT only supported certain type of apps - those that were made to run on ARM processors (same processor tech used for phones) and it failed. Windows 10 S supports Windows Universal Apps and also Apps from the Store that are just ported desktop PC apps (Win32 - made for x86/x64 CPU architectures), so you can for example run Call of Duty Infinite Warfare or say Adobe Photoshop from Windows Store on Windows 10 S machines, but you can't install Steam on them. If it was ported to Store however, then you would be able to install it.

    Another thing that Windows 10 S features is speed, security and the OS itself is more battery efficient because it doesn't run traditional Win32 apps.

    Hope I didn't confuse you even more.

    P.S.: Yes, it is upgradable to Windows 10 Pro.
    Thanks, that was very useful , actually being upgradable its an advantage!
    06-06-2017 02:16 PM
  16. ZvjerOPC's Avatar
    Why would you even want to do that? I rather prefer windows 10 pro over the s version, i get that its more fast and secure, but theres not a huge difference on that matter i think
    It seems like a good fit for people who tend to attract viruses and other malicious code. For people who don't really use anything else than a browser and a few store apps.
    panchoroms likes this.
    06-06-2017 02:54 PM
  17. panchoroms's Avatar
    It seems like a good fit for people who tend to attract viruses and other malicious code. For people who don't really use anything else than a browser and a few store apps.
    You right, it make sense
    06-06-2017 03:32 PM
  18. onlysublime's Avatar
    huge advantages for schools and businesses as 10 S is meant to be much easier to manage because it's locked down and because all the apps are sandboxed (less so for the desktop apps that are wrapped but still better than true desktop apps).

    big advantage for home users is the apps are sandboxed so less likely to be hurt by harmful software than traditional X86 apps.

    advantage for Microsoft as they can take a cut of every software sale. this is a big part of how Apple and Google make money. Advantage for developers as it increases visibility. And with increased visibility, comes increased volume of sales which hopefully translates to lower app pricing. This is how software has dropped to such low prices. Make it up through volume. I remember shopping for an onscreen keyboard for my Windows 7 Tablet PC because the default keyboard was awful. And I found an obscure one on a website that the developer wanted $20! $20 for an onscreen keyboard! And it took a lot of Googling to find it so I wonder how much that developer ever made.

    now that traditional X86 software can be wrapped in a new package relatively easily, it should lower development costs enough to make it worth transitioning it to the Windows Store. Of course, the big companies like Adobe are probably not going to the Store route as they don't want to sacrifice revenue. However, a lot of companies get around Apple's cut by essentially offering software for free and then making money through subscriptions. Since Adobe has Creative Cloud, this could be the way around having Microsoft take a significant cut.
    panchoroms likes this.
    06-06-2017 04:23 PM
  19. onlysublime's Avatar
    here is some good information on Windows 10 S:

    https://arstechnica.com/information-...-windows-10-s/

    Both applications built using Microsoft's new Universal Windows Program (UWP) framework, and traditional Win32 applications ported to the Store using the Desktop Bridge (formerly known as "Project Centennial") will be permitted, but Win32 applications that use their own installers will not function.

    The Store lockdown is intended to give machines more consistent performance, battery life, and security. UWP store applications are run in tightly controlled sandboxes, and Windows can suspend or even terminate applications to reduce the usage of memory, processor, and battery resources. Centennial applications are much less constrained but are still precluded from installing things like background services and other programs that run automatically, without user intervention. Both UWP and Win32 Store applications use a single mechanism for automatic updates, too, simplifying patching and similar maintenance.

    While some schools do indeed equip each student with their own computer, many treat them as shared resources. At the start of each class, students will pick up a laptop from the pile, log in, and then return it to the pile for the next student at the end of the class. This multiuser situation makes security arguably more important than that for privately owned machines. A multiuser setup also requires work to ensure that actions such as the first login to a machine are fast.

    Systems used this way also need to offer a full school day's worth of battery life. The constraints on Store applications (and especially UWP applications) should help achieve this, and the next major Windows update, due in autumn and codenamed "Redstone 3," is going to take further steps to limit the resource consumption of background applications.

    Although the Store is in many ways an appealing distribution channel—if nothing else, it guarantees clean software installation and uninstallation, and update model is much more convenient than having to update every piece of software individually—application developers have done little to embrace it, and similarly, Windows users do not seem particularly interested in acquiring their software through the Store.
    panchoroms likes this.
    06-06-2017 09:27 PM
  20. ZvjerOPC's Avatar
    You right, it make sense
    I know you can still be secure with Pro, but I guess the idea is to lock down the user and sleep without worry.
    06-07-2017 01:44 AM
  21. Keeptechcoolandsimple's Avatar
    It seems like a good fit for people who tend to attract viruses and other malicious code. For people who don't really use anything else than a browser and a few store apps.
    i hadn't thought of it from that angle. kinda had a "duh" moment there. ^_^
    06-07-2017 04:29 AM
  22. panchoroms's Avatar
    here is some good information on Windows 10 S:

    https://arstechnica.com/information-...-windows-10-s/

    Both applications built using Microsoft's new Universal Windows Program (UWP) framework, and traditional Win32 applications ported to the Store using the Desktop Bridge (formerly known as "Project Centennial") will be permitted, but Win32 applications that use their own installers will not function.

    The Store lockdown is intended to give machines more consistent performance, battery life, and security. UWP store applications are run in tightly controlled sandboxes, and Windows can suspend or even terminate applications to reduce the usage of memory, processor, and battery resources. Centennial applications are much less constrained but are still precluded from installing things like background services and other programs that run automatically, without user intervention. Both UWP and Win32 Store applications use a single mechanism for automatic updates, too, simplifying patching and similar maintenance.

    While some schools do indeed equip each student with their own computer, many treat them as shared resources. At the start of each class, students will pick up a laptop from the pile, log in, and then return it to the pile for the next student at the end of the class. This multiuser situation makes security arguably more important than that for privately owned machines. A multiuser setup also requires work to ensure that actions such as the first login to a machine are fast.

    Systems used this way also need to offer a full school day's worth of battery life. The constraints on Store applications (and especially UWP applications) should help achieve this, and the next major Windows update, due in autumn and codenamed "Redstone 3," is going to take further steps to limit the resource consumption of background applications.

    Although the Store is in many ways an appealing distribution channel—if nothing else, it guarantees clean software installation and uninstallation, and update model is much more convenient than having to update every piece of software individually—application developers have done little to embrace it, and similarly, Windows users do not seem particularly interested in acquiring their software through the Store.
    Its intersting to see hows the path that leads to improvement or advantages that may have one OS over the other considernig the individuals needs, and how its evolves , S seems like a perfect choice if youre ok working whit apps approved or ported into The Windows Store , but for Home users as i am, at this time the pro version fullfill my expectatives; im looking forward for the "Redstone 3 Release".
    Thanks bro for the info,!!
    06-07-2017 10:59 AM
  23. lanakaryatna's Avatar
    You can visit this link for answer you question https://forums.windowscentral.com/su...tm#post3674959
    panchoroms likes this.
    06-09-2017 11:16 PM

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