Microsoft waves goodbye to underwater data centers

GraniteStateColin

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Why did they decide to remove them? That's why I opened the article, but no information on that. E.g., Was it too expensive to service them, even with the lower failure rate? Was it concern over heating the water and causing environmental issues? Was it always intended just as an experiment to gather data and never to be a long-term approach?
 

Sean Endicott

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Why did they decide to remove them? That's why I opened the article, but no information on that. E.g., Was it too expensive to service them, even with the lower failure rate? Was it concern over heating the water and causing environmental issues? Was it always intended just as an experiment to gather data and never to be a long-term approach?
Unfortunately, Microsoft hasn't shared details as to why it stopped using data centers. I've reached out to them to see if there are more details available. So far, we just know that the company does not have any active underwater datacenters.
 
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fjtorres5591

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Why did they decide to remove them? That's why I opened the article, but no information on that. E.g., Was it too expensive to service them, even with the lower failure rate? Was it concern over heating the water and causing environmental issues? Was it always intended just as an experiment to gather data and never to be a long-term approach?and
The lower failure rate almost certainly came from the nitrogen atmosphere. That is applicable everywhere. Another (not mentioned) advantage is the data center modules were prebuilt and dropped into place. They might switch to standardized factory built, sealed modules. Maybe container sized.

Experiments end.
Looking at the photo in the OP, the underwater environent sems pretty corrosive, what with the barnacles and rust. Savings in cooling might be outweighed by manufacturing cost and higher maintenance cost (having to bring it up for upgrading, for example).

Just speculation but whatever they might have learned, if useful, will be a trade secret. Why help Amazon cut *their* costs? 😎
 

GraniteStateColin

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May 9, 2012
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The lower failure rate almost certainly came from the nitrogen atmosphere. That is applicable everywhere. Another (not mentioned) advantage is the data center modules were prebuilt and dropped into place. They might switch to standardized factory built, sealed modules. Maybe container sized.

Experiments end.
Looking at the photo in the OP, the underwater environent sems pretty corrosive, what with the barnacles and rust. Savings in cooling might be outweighed by manufacturing cost and higher maintenance cost (having to bring it up for upgrading, for example).

Just speculation but whatever they might have learned, if useful, will be a trade secret. Why help Amazon cut *their* costs? 😎

Yeah, those are consistent with my assumptions too, and (also to Sean's point), I'm not surprised MS isn't sharing those details. But, w/o them, we're left with our own speculation. Understandable, but also less interesting. :)
 

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