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02-23-2015 09:25 AM
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  1. Jas00555's Avatar
    Quick question to the people who don't like to "stretch" to the top: Do you not use the notification center either? I mean, I personally don't care one way or the other, but it seems to me like the notification center would be worse compared to a hamburger menu for one-handed use.
    Nicholas Maguire likes this.
    02-17-2015 06:33 PM
  2. Alain_A's Avatar
    good question...maybe they gone ask to open it from the buttom
    02-17-2015 06:44 PM
  3. manicottiK's Avatar
    Quick question to the people who don't like to "stretch" to the top: Do you not use the notification center either?
    I don't dislike the notification center, but I don't go into it regularly thus I don't have to "stretch" for it very often.

    I use the quick settings very infrequently (all radios are on at all times, screen is set to auto -- what is everyone adjusting so often ;) When I do notice the notification icon appear in the status bar, I sometimes tap the Windows key to see my if main tiles have anything to tell me. If they don't, whatever notification triggered the icon can wait, so I press the Back key and resume what I was doing. When I have time free, I might swipe down to see what's there or to clear the icon.

    I don't mind the gesture being a "stretch" because it isn't needed to operate apps -- indeed, it is specifically outside of apps. Because that function is wanted, but not actually needed, it's OK that it be more difficult to use (as much as any of this stuff is actually difficult). I don't want to have to make that kind of a reach to change tabs (as the new Photos app does) and I don't want to render the Back button useless by filling the back stack with junk (as the new Photo app does when you change "tabs").

    Oddly, while many folks are complaining about W10 mimicking Android, the latest Android UX guidelines suggest that swipe gestures be used to change tabs and note that tabs are NOT "places" and thus changing tabs should not add an entry to the back stack. W10 isn't mimicking Android, it appears to be swapping places with it from a UX perspective. (Of course, this assumes that one app's really bad implementation is representative of what MS hopes to deliver and that Android developers really start to embrace a better form of UX. I suspect that neither is actually true.)
    a5cent and Mahdi Ghiasi like this.
    02-17-2015 07:01 PM
  4. Athul Paul's Avatar
    Hamburger button is from android right? Why no one noticed about it?
    Almost all android apps have those kind of buttons and its very sad and annoying to see them on windows 10. Why can't Microsoft use their old and simple windows phone 8.x design. Anyway it wasn't bad at all and that's what made windows stand out from other OS.

    Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
    Attached Thumbnails 47565.jpg   47564.jpg   47562.jpg  
    Kram Sacul and ohgood like this.
    02-17-2015 07:10 PM
  5. Alain_A's Avatar
    how was it on those web site 10 years ago? with the hamburger button
    02-17-2015 07:26 PM
  6. rhapdog's Avatar
    There are times when one handed operation is absolutely essential i.e taking notes whilst on the landline and responding to a text or email. As a former property manager I can tell you there have been countless time critical scenarios. If you aren't a hands-on property manager, then you are just a glorified call rep.
    Yes, there are. Because of this thread, I have been purposefully trying to use my phone with one hand as I do other things. I have discovered that there are a number of things that I have been doing one handed and didn't realize until I became conscious of it. Things I wouldn't necessarily recommend for others to do one handed. I'll discuss that toward the bottom of this post after all the quotes.

    As RumouredNow mentioned in an earlier post, we humans are by nature are adaptable. Some people don't like change as change comes at a price; never the less it is inevitable as the nature of technology is progressive. MS are moving to design which they feel is progressive and which will appeal to a variety of audiences. You don't need to go beyond the xbox one controller to see which direction they were heading; never the less even if they ship with the hamburger icons; don't forget these are update-able universal store apps.
    Yes, we are adaptable. Also, to be expanded below, because it goes with the one above.

    Lastly, majority of the smartphone UX design being geared to right handers I imagine that is because either majority of the testers are right handers, ambidextrous or are left handers who have adapted to using a smartphone with their right hand (I know plenty of lefties who use their phones with their right hands). Personally I would say the world in general in terms is geared to right hand use. i.e most kitchenware, scissors, certain mouse models, certain ring binders, certain physical notepads, the location of the trackpad in laptops and so on.
    Yes, the majority are right-handed persons, which has helped me to come to a very surprising conclusion about which hand I use for my phone.

    Okay, now for my discussion, which will touch on all the above.

    I have discovered that when I am just using my phone casually, I'll use my right hand "most" of the time. However, any time I am doing something else that is a "primary" action, (such as taking notes, opening a door, etc.) I find that I have my phone in my left hand and that I am as capable using it in my left hand as in my right. I don't know how or when that happened, but it is something I noticed as I have been more conscious of it since starting participation in this thread.

    You must also realize that when I first got the phone, I was unable to use it in one hand and even found it difficult to use with two hands without dropping it. Why? Because the Lumia 635 comes with a very slick case. I also have short fingers which exacerbates the problem. What did I do about this? I adapted. Or, should I say, I started by adapting my phone. I bought a rugged case that has ribs on the back of it, and a good rubberized feel that makes it quite easy to grip with one hand without dropping it.

    With this case, I have adapted to become very nimble with it. I can, using my fingers on the backside of the phone, manipulate the phone up and down quickly in order to reach all areas of the phone, without ever losing balance of the phone. Can everyone adapt to this? I doubt it. I'm sure that some could, but it takes using the proper tools. Tools are the main way man has adapted to things since the beginning of time. My tool was a case. I didn't really purchase it so much to be able to use the phone with one hand, I got the case to keep it from being so slippery, because I was unable to even hold the phone without a case.

    Now, the case made the phone bigger, and harder to reach areas of the screen. I have, however, adapted to reach. Having the short fingers has made me learn how to do a lot of things differently from the way other people do things, but I've learned how to get things to work. I do find myself preferring to use two hands whenever possible.

    If I'm busy with my hands in most cases, I don't need to stop what I'm doing to answer the phone because I have a Voyager Legend Bluetooth headset that I wear all day long. There are some people that say, "I wouldn't be caught dead out in public with that headset protruding out of my ear." To them I say, "It sure looks better than a large phone covering half my face everywhere I go." Honestly, some people can't seem to walk in public without a large phone constantly up against their face. I know most people don't like to wear headsets, but this one is comfortable for me, it is waterproof, stops background and wind noise quite well, and I can use my voice to answer or reject calls. That means I never have to touch my phone if I receive a call or a text. (Cortana handles the text part quite nicely, my Bluetooth handles answering or rejecting the call.) That means I can keep washing the car, changing the spark plugs, changing a diaper, or even washing dishes. We all hate to have to grab our phone if we've got our hands either greasy or soapy, or even something else while changing a diaper. Yeah, been there.

    I find that I only need to pull my phone out when calling into a customer service center, and I have to press "1" or "5" or whatever, as far as making calls go. When it comes to "non phone call features", there are some of those I need to get out the phone to handle the phone for. However, Cortana keeps me from having to do very much handling, which I really like. Now that I can dictate emails, things have gotten even easier.

    95% of the time, when I need to use my hands for my phone at all in Windows 10, it is because I am either checking emails while I'm out, which is rare, or because I've decided to play a game. Oh, and since the Windows 10 tech preview, I am also having to use my hands to manually open and check the weather, because Cortana no longer knows my accurate location. She's now locating me by my IP address instead of my GPS location. ?!? Irritating. I can't ask her for current temperature, forecast, or anything, because she gives it to me for another state (which varies which state). I'll be glad when that's fixed. Every other app knows my correct location except Cortana, and she's the one I need it for the most.

    Pressing the call button while not in a call will bring up Cortana. This is a must have for me. I don't have to pull out my phone. Heck, my phone can be on a table in the next room, and I don't have to worry about it in most cases. And, with the battery life on this preview, it is in the next room on the charger a lot of the time, so I'm very dependent on my Bluetooth headset, Cortana, and some other speech enabled apps that I use.

    As far as one handed operation goes, I find that, for me, pressing the hamburger menu is actually easier than doing the sideways swipe. Like I said, I have short fingers. The sideways swiping is the one motion that makes me want to drop the phone, because I put weight from one side to the other of the phone, and I am unable to hold it all the way across on the back, so it tilts over and tries to drop. Irritating. I realize, however, that I am in a minority here. I never complained about swiping back and forth to get to things, even though I hated it. I just worked on trying to adapt to it. To me, it seemed like a stupid way to get things done. I re-iterate, "to me." After reading many reviews I saw that a lot of people liked it, and, even though I didn't, I decided that since that is the way it is, I would just adapt and learn to like it. I did learn to adapt, but it wasn't easy.

    I'll stop now, before I create 10 pages in the forum with just this one post.
    02-17-2015 07:33 PM
  7. Nicholas Maguire's Avatar
    So, while posting in the forums earlier with the WC app, I noticed a nuisance of the pivots. When I was commenting and moving the cursor in a sentence to add in a word, it registered it as a swipe and kept going to a different page. Talk about annoying. I think Microsoft is going in the right direction!
    EssThree likes this.
    02-17-2015 08:38 PM
  8. skinnypig118's Avatar
    Quick question to the people who don't like to "stretch" to the top: Do you not use the notification center either? I mean, I personally don't care one way or the other, but it seems to me like the notification center would be worse compared to a hamburger menu for one-handed use.
    Who said pulling the notification from the top was a good idea to begin with? Does having the notification center with bad usability mean we should introduce more UI elements with bad usability?

    The silver lining to the notification center is at least we didn't start off with an implementation that's usable for one-handed use and have it downgrade to one that's less usable. While it certainly would be awesome if they re-thought about how to implement a better way to access the notification center, I do realize the chance of that happening is next to zero; that ship has sailed so to speak. The hamburger menu on the other hand is still in flux and that's why everyone here is debating about it.
    02-17-2015 09:43 PM
  9. drachen23's Avatar
    Quick question to the people who don't like to "stretch" to the top: Do you not use the notification center either? I mean, I personally don't care one way or the other, but it seems to me like the notification center would be worse compared to a hamburger menu for one-handed use.
    As a 1520 user, I despise that it's at the top. I even have to shift my hand when I use my postage stamp-sized 635 (for Win 10), and I have very long fingers. I don't like a lot of things about it, to be honest. It's at the very top of the screen and completely hidden. I don't like swipe-from-the-edges motions in general because unlike a hamburger button, there is nothing visual to indicate that the gesture is there. You either know about it and use it, or don't know about it and have no clue. It was something that was shamelessly and a lazily ripped from Android whole cloth. There's nothing well-conceived or "Metro" about it.

    Ironically, with Windows 10, they could go with an ergonomically better gesture: swipe-from-the-right like the tablet version of the OS. It's much easier for a one-handed grip. It still stinks of mystery meat though and I'd probably stick with the top-down gesture if I was in charge of WP 10 UX. When there's no visual cue, people go by memory and for all mobile OSs, that's the swipe from the top edge.

    The reason you didn't see a big UI backlash about the notification center like you are about hamburgers now is because before WP 8.1, the lack of a notification center was easily one of the biggest complaints about the OS. Even the most jaded UX nazi (like yours truly) recognizes that a functional-but-lazy notification center is much better than no notification center at all. If instead they had decided to nix live tiles completely in favor of the notification center, you'd have had the exact same sort of outcry you do now about hamburger buttons. All this fuss about MS going from an elegant and functional, if imperfect, UX to a merely mediocre one for no good reason.
    02-17-2015 10:09 PM
  10. drachen23's Avatar
    So, while posting in the forums earlier with the WC app, I noticed a nuisance of the pivots. When I was commenting and moving the cursor in a sentence to add in a word, it registered it as a swipe and kept going to a different page. Talk about annoying. I think Microsoft is going in the right direction!
    According to the MS docs, you shouldn't use textboxes in pivots or panos/hubs for that very reason. There are ways of making the textbox eat the swipe gesture and it should be reported to the developer as a bug.
    02-17-2015 10:20 PM
  11. a5cent's Avatar
    Hamburger button is from android right? Why no one noticed about it?
    A)
    No, the 🍔 button has been around since the 80's, but became widespread on the WWW as a component of responsive web page design, which is where the Android folks "copied" it from.

    B)
    Even if it had originated from Android, that's not the issue. There's nothing wrong with taking inspiration from Android, as long as WP retains its own strengths.
    TechFreak1, EssThree and xandros9 like this.
    02-18-2015 03:11 AM
  12. a5cent's Avatar
    According to the MS docs, you shouldn't use textboxes in pivots or panos/hubs for that very reason. There are ways of making the textbox eat the swipe gesture and it should be reported to the developer as a bug.
    Exactly, this is just an example of a junior developer screwing up. It's not an error of the design language. Scrollable maps are also components that should never be placed in a pivot, as they too can 'swallow' swiping gestures.
    02-18-2015 03:17 AM
  13. TechFreak1's Avatar
    There are times when one handed operation is absolutely essential i.e taking notes whilst on the landline and responding to a text or email. As a former property manager I can tell you there have been countless time critical scenarios. If you aren't a hands-on property manager, then you are just a glorified call rep.
    Yes, there are. Because of this thread, I have been purposefully trying to use my phone with one hand as I do other things. I have discovered that there are a number of things that I have been doing one handed and didn't realize until I became conscious of it. Things I wouldn't necessarily recommend for others to do one handed. I'll discuss that toward the bottom of this post after all the quotes.
    As RumouredNow mentioned in an earlier post, we humans are by nature are adaptable. Some people don't like change as change comes at a price; never the less it is inevitable as the nature of technology is progressive. MS are moving to design which they feel is progressive and which will appeal to a variety of audiences. You don't need to go beyond the xbox one controller to see which direction they were heading; never the less even if they ship with the hamburger icons; don't forget these are update-able universal store apps.
    Yes, we are adaptable. Also, to be expanded below, because it goes with the one above.
    Lastly, majority of the smartphone UX design being geared to right handers I imagine that is because either majority of the testers are right handers, ambidextrous or are left handers who have adapted to using a smartphone with their right hand (I know plenty of lefties who use their phones with their right hands). Personally I would say the world in general in terms is geared to right hand use. i.e most kitchenware, scissors, certain mouse models, certain ring binders, certain physical notepads, the location of the trackpad in laptops and so on.

    Yes, the majority are right-handed persons, which has helped me to come to a very surprising conclusion about which hand I use for my phone.

    Okay, now for my discussion, which will touch on all the above.

    I have discovered that when I am just using my phone casually, I'll use my right hand "most" of the time. However, any time I am doing something else that is a "primary" action, (such as taking notes, opening a door, etc.) I find that I have my phone in my left hand and that I am as capable using it in my left hand as in my right. I don't know how or when that happened, but it is something I noticed as I have been more conscious of it since starting participation in this thread.

    You must also realize that when I first got the phone, I was unable to use it in one hand and even found it difficult to use with two hands without dropping it. Why? Because the Lumia 635 comes with a very slick case. I also have short fingers which exacerbates the problem. What did I do about this? I adapted. Or, should I say, I started by adapting my phone. I bought a rugged case that has ribs on the back of it, and a good rubberized feel that makes it quite easy to grip with one hand without dropping it.

    With this case, I have adapted to become very nimble with it. I can, using my fingers on the backside of the phone, manipulate the phone up and down quickly in order to reach all areas of the phone, without ever losing balance of the phone. Can everyone adapt to this? I doubt it. I'm sure that some could, but it takes using the proper tools. Tools are the main way man has adapted to things since the beginning of time. My tool was a case. I didn't really purchase it so much to be able to use the phone with one hand, I got the case to keep it from being so slippery, because I was unable to even hold the phone without a case.

    Now, the case made the phone bigger, and harder to reach areas of the screen. I have, however, adapted to reach. Having the short fingers has made me learn how to do a lot of things differently from the way other people do things, but I've learned how to get things to work. I do find myself preferring to use two hands whenever possible.

    If I'm busy with my hands in most cases, I don't need to stop what I'm doing to answer the phone because I have a Voyager Legend Bluetooth headset that I wear all day long. There are some people that say, "I wouldn't be caught dead out in public with that headset protruding out of my ear." To them I say, "It sure looks better than a large phone covering half my face everywhere I go." Honestly, some people can't seem to walk in public without a large phone constantly up against their face. I know most people don't like to wear headsets, but this one is comfortable for me, it is waterproof, stops background and wind noise quite well, and I can use my voice to answer or reject calls. That means I never have to touch my phone if I receive a call or a text. (Cortana handles the text part quite nicely, my Bluetooth handles answering or rejecting the call.) That means I can keep washing the car, changing the spark plugs, changing a diaper, or even washing dishes. We all hate to have to grab our phone if we've got our hands either greasy or soapy, or even something else while changing a diaper. Yeah, been there.

    I find that I only need to pull my phone out when calling into a customer service center, and I have to press "1" or "5" or whatever, as far as making calls go. When it comes to "non phone call features", there are some of those I need to get out the phone to handle the phone for. However, Cortana keeps me from having to do very much handling, which I really like. Now that I can dictate emails, things have gotten even easier.

    95% of the time, when I need to use my hands for my phone at all in Windows 10, it is because I am either checking emails while I'm out, which is rare, or because I've decided to play a game. Oh, and since the Windows 10 tech preview, I am also having to use my hands to manually open and check the weather, because Cortana no longer knows my accurate location. She's now locating me by my IP address instead of my GPS location. ?!? Irritating. I can't ask her for current temperature, forecast, or anything, because she gives it to me for another state (which varies which state). I'll be glad when that's fixed. Every other app knows my correct location except Cortana, and she's the one I need it for the most.

    Pressing the call button while not in a call will bring up Cortana. This is a must have for me. I don't have to pull out my phone. Heck, my phone can be on a table in the next room, and I don't have to worry about it in most cases. And, with the battery life on this preview, it is in the next room on the charger a lot of the time, so I'm very dependent on my Bluetooth headset, Cortana, and some other speech enabled apps that I use.

    As far as one handed operation goes, I find that, for me, pressing the hamburger menu is actually easier than doing the sideways swipe. Like I said, I have short fingers. The sideways swiping is the one motion that makes me want to drop the phone, because I put weight from one side to the other of the phone, and I am unable to hold it all the way across on the back, so it tilts over and tries to drop. Irritating. I realize, however, that I am in a minority here. I never complained about swiping back and forth to get to things, even though I hated it. I just worked on trying to adapt to it. To me, it seemed like a stupid way to get things done. I re-iterate, "to me." After reading many reviews I saw that a lot of people liked it, and, even though I didn't, I decided that since that is the way it is, I would just adapt and learn to like it. I did learn to adapt, but it wasn't easy.
    That was a good read (I didn’t want to truncate it as clearly, as either you type ridiculously quickly or put in a lot of time )) and does highlight interesting points, predominately – people in general use muscle memory without realising it. I imagine if everyone took the time to analyse their usage they may come to surprising conclusions as well.

    Furthermore, as you have adapted over time and sought tools to assist and I imagine others will too with Windows 10 for phones whether they like it or not.

    Which is why I said people will need to use the preview as daily driver for a month or so; as during the first couple of days you’re usually setting things up, tweaking the start screen to your liking etc. Only then does a person (generally speaking) start to use the phone normally.

    Never the less once change is imposed, people either incorporate such change or rebel against it. In this case by switching platforms however given the UX similarities jumping platforms to Android isn’t really going to solve anything as that is full of as Praxius put it:

    full of hamburgers and hotdogs.


    Sure they can switch to ios or to other platforms like Sailfish and that is their choice.

    Only time will tell after Windows 10 hits whether or not moving away from the core design principles of Wp 7 & 8 was a good move on Microsoft’s part. For all windows phone users sakes, I hope it pans out as things can easily go sideways when you least expect it.

    I'll stop now, before I create 10 pages in the forum with just this one post.
    Haha, habit huh?


    Exactly, this is just an example of a junior developer screwing up. It's not an error of the design language. Scrollable maps are also components that should never be placed in a pivot, as they too can 'swallow' swiping gestures.

    In the case of the Windows Central App, perhaps it was either delay the app or get it out there into the hands of the users; however most likely Jay Bennett is already working on a pet projection in his spare time in readiness for Windows 10 ;).

    Edit:

    Maybe this would be a better option as opposed to the the hamburger icon since it is already in use in Outlook.com, perhaps in the new office builds but having issues with the W10 TP so I can't check (but I won't go into that as that is best suited in another thread).

    grid-icon.png
    Last edited by TechFreak1; 02-18-2015 at 05:34 AM.
    Mahdi Ghiasi, EssThree and rhapdog like this.
    02-18-2015 04:56 AM
  14. manicottiK's Avatar
    Exactly, this is just an example of a junior developer screwing up. It's not an error of the design language. Scrollable maps are also components that should never be placed in a pivot, as they too can 'swallow' swiping gestures.
    Which is why, when new students asked us to add a map to our course information page so that they knew where their classes were meeting, we "locked" the map to prevent it from consuming their normal swipes, which often occur at the bottom of the screen. However, because students may occasionally want to pan or zoom the map, we allowed them to unlock it. While unlocked, they can't swipe sideways near the bottom to change panorama panels, but the "fix" will be obvious to them since they had just tapped a button to allow the map to slide around. See here:
    map-lock.png
    a5cent and TechFreak1 like this.
    02-18-2015 06:35 AM
  15. Nicholas Maguire's Avatar
    Still, I won't miss pivots. They're nice and all, but they're not necessary. If you've actually tried the tech preview, the new photos app is quite nice. My brothers first reaction was "This is so much better!"
    tiziano27 and Praxius like this.
    02-18-2015 12:14 PM
  16. manicottiK's Avatar
    In other posts, I have used the new Photos app as an example of what's wrong with how hamburgers are currently implemented. The issues range from location (far corner) to impact on the back stack and the Back key.
    EssThree and white_Shadoww like this.
    02-18-2015 06:36 PM
  17. OutIook's Avatar
    If you don't like new UI changes, vote here:

    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/forums/101801-feature-suggestions/suggestions/6623043-stick-to-modern-don-t-copy-android
    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/forums/101801-feature-suggestions/suggestions/6997054-keep-all-the-menu-navigation-buttons-at-the-bottom
    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/forums/101801-feature-suggestions/suggestions/6996793-move-navigation-bar-back-to-the-bottom-in-windows
    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/forums/101801-feature-suggestions/suggestions/6993439-buttons-to-down-not-use-hamburger
    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/forums/101801-feature-suggestions/suggestions/7005971-windows10-should-not-copy-android-ios-instead-ref

    Also use the Feedback application in Windows 10 Preview version in Windows Phone, this is very important.
    02-19-2015 12:30 AM
  18. rhapdog's Avatar
    Where do we vote if we DO like the UI changes to let them know we want them to keep them?

    Sorry, I just had to play the other side of that. I couldn't resist.
    02-19-2015 07:32 AM
  19. Rellik66's Avatar
    So I just had idea...

    I have heard of the idea used on Android(?) that swiping from the edge brings up the hamburger menu, well why not take that idea and improve on it?

    First the menu pops up aligned to where you swipe from the left/right(?) edge, second you have the option to highlight a menu item while keeping you finger on the screen, and upon lifting your finger you the menu item is selected. This could be an effective replacement for pivots, and help one handed users out too.
    a5cent and rhapdog like this.
    02-19-2015 12:43 PM
  20. Giffdev's Avatar
    wow, this is a great discussion with a lot of feedback. As far as sending this to Microsoft, we are seeing the feedback and love the passion around UI! I'm sure all of our UI designers are keenly aware of these hot button issues (yes, pun intended), and they definitely are aware of heatmaps showing thumb tracking, etc. :) The best way to get this feedback to us would be either through uservoice (as someone listed above), or by using the feedback tool on Windows Phone (or Windows) to file feedback and +1 issues. Remember, it's a little more work but often more productive to search for someone who's posted the same feedback suggestion that you have and adding your +1 than creating a brand new suggestion, as all the +1s help each other bubble up faster than when we look at everything individually and try to link all the similar issues together manually.

    Again, love the discussion and just wanted to pop in and say we're seeing it and thanks for being Windows Insiders.
    02-19-2015 03:10 PM
  21. OutIook's Avatar
    Well I hope that you will not ignore the 12759 votes (currently) and the other different topics in user voice with the same meaning - they are many more, that advice you to keep the UI consistent:

    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/forums/101801-feature-suggestions/suggestions/6623043-stick-to-modern-don-t-copy-android

    Thanks!
    02-20-2015 03:37 AM
  22. tiziano27's Avatar
    Well I hope that you will not ignore the 12759 votes (currently) and the other different topics in user voice with the same meaning - they are many more, that advice you to keep the UI consistent:

    https://windowsphone.uservoice.com/f...t-copy-android

    Thanks!
    12.000 votes in User Voice comes from 4.000 accounts. Are those accounts a representative sample of the target market? I'd say It's just a small group of hipsters whining and giving child-like arguments as an intent to keep the product as weird as possible.

    Keep your expectations low.
    02-20-2015 05:53 AM
  23. rhapdog's Avatar
    So I just had idea...

    I have heard of the idea used on Android(?) that swiping from the edge brings up the hamburger menu, well why not take that idea and improve on it?

    First the menu pops up aligned to where you swipe from the left/right(?) edge, second you have the option to highlight a menu item while keeping you finger on the screen, and upon lifting your finger you the menu item is selected. This could be an effective replacement for pivots, and help one handed users out too.
    I really like this idea. Put it into feedback and give us a link to it. I'd definitely +1 that one. That should be for phones and tablets and laptops/desktops. Those with touch screen could have that option, those without touchscreen could still use the hamburger menu with the mouse. Great idea. Like when the numbers key in the 8.1 keyboard would allow you to hold and slide to a number without having to switch over. That would make it very efficient.
    a5cent, ininjam and TechFreak1 like this.
    02-20-2015 06:12 PM
  24. manicottiK's Avatar
    ...swiping from the edge brings up the hamburger menu...aligned to where you swipe from the edge, second you have the option to highlight a menu item while keeping you finger on the screen, and upon lifting your finger you the menu item is selected. This could be an effective replacement for pivots, and help one handed users out too.
    I don't see it. Some apps will have hamburger lists longer than a screen so they will need to scroll. For that to work, vertical dragging must be used to scroll the list. If so, your idea that a user slide his finger to a list item and then lift won't work because that motion will be used for scrolling. (Because consistency is important in ease of use, MS wouldn't be able to use your method for some apps and not for others.)

    I'm still confused about the UI elements being proposed for intra-page navigation (i.e., panoramas or pivots) vs inter-page navigation (i.e., links from one place in the app to another). I think that most mobile apps are fairly simple in terms of the number of pages/areas within the app, but some are big. My main app, a university portal has 70 different pages, although that count includes settings pages. Most of the non-settings pages have multiple panels, either using pivots or panoramas. How should navigation in complex apps be managed? What role do hamburgers play? What other kind of control makes sense? Is direct access to everything really needed? (And for what it's worth, the WP version of the app supports pinning virtually anything to the Start screen as a way of providing direct access for pages that students access frequently.)
    a5cent and TechFreak1 like this.
    02-20-2015 08:25 PM
  25. Ebuka Allison's Avatar
    12.000 votes in User Voice comes from 4.000 accounts. Are those accounts a representative sample of the target market? I'd say It's just a small group of hipsters whining and giving child-like arguments as an intent to keep the product as weird as possible.

    Keep your expectations low.
    You're absolutely right. No matter what happens, Microsoft should always ignore feedback because the majority of users would not vote anyway.
    02-23-2015 02:20 AM
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