1. FAHMI BASSEM's Avatar
    181iv7orxmci.jpg
    Here's a link to the feedback:
    feedback-hub:?contextid=128&feedbackid=307ab7a8-eba3-47c3-bf46-38bb41e8ac79&form=1&src=2
    ...from medical perspective:
    Those stolen minutes as delicious as they seem arent worth it because
    youre fragmenting what little extra sleep youre getting, so it is of poor quality + the body needs some time to get you ready to wake up. When you let yourself go back to sleep, your body thinks, False alarm! I guess I didnt need to do anything, because were not getting up after all, and settles in. When that buzzer goes off a second time, your body and brain are taken by surprise, resulting in that groggy, fuzzy-headed feeling called sleep inertia. The more you snooze, the more confused your body and brain get (So are we going back to sleep or not?!), so youll probably feel more out of it even though you actually spent extra time in bed. Whats more, this type of sleep inertia can persist for up to two to four hours, research has found + if you're following a sleeping cycle (consistent sleeping and waking up times), snooze button messes up your cycle!
    Here's a video summarizes the idea:

    And from doers perspective, snooze button is behind being late for class, meeting, or whatever you've planned to do in the morning!!
    10-21-2016 02:31 PM
  2. gpobernardo's Avatar
    It's a matter of choice (and discipline). Once you stop giving people the ability to choose, they would choose to go somewhere else. That may not be good for a not-so-healthy Windows Phone market share.

    Ironically, some people choose to lose even if they know they will with the idea that they can eventually recover whatever was lost.

    An alarm app that doesn't have a Snooze button sounds more viable, instead of removing the feature from a device. Besides, if Microsoft removed that feature from Windows Mobile (or at least from the default clock app), some developer would create an app that has it anyway.
    10-21-2016 03:36 PM
  3. FAHMI BASSEM's Avatar
    I'm not asking for removing but for giving a choice, it's an idea that can be implemented in several ways, either permanently removing for all alarms from settings or for each alarm individually + this has nothing to do with the market share!
    gpobernardo likes this.
    10-21-2016 03:45 PM

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