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08-05-2016 01:19 PM
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  1. Grimwar's Avatar
    Hmm i am MAD, 22 years? ARE you INSANE
    08-01-2016 07:03 PM
  2. etphoto's Avatar
    I added this thread to my favorites so in 2037 I can come back here to learn what to do in preparation for 2038.

    Sent from my Surface 3
    08-01-2016 08:37 PM
  3. Grimwar's Avatar
    I added this thread to my favorites so in 2037 I can come back here to learn what to do in preparation for 2038.

    Sent from my Surface 3
    Error 404
    08-01-2016 10:36 PM
  4. digitaldd's Avatar
    Time to calculate the 64bit limit for unix time and start the panic, for when 64bit computing ends..
    08-04-2016 09:39 AM
  5. gwinegarden's Avatar
    Yeah, I remember back in the 60s and 70s, the people writing software new good and well that there would be an issue in the year 2000. However, it was so far away, they all had the attitude that "nobody will be using this in 30+ years.".
    You are partially correct. I was writing mainframe programs in the 60's. The real reason we used 6 character dates, back then, was that we couldn't afford not to. Memory, then, was in K (!). We ran an insurance company using a Honeywell 120 with 20K. The next company that I worked for had 24 (wow).

    I had a program, in production, that had 12 characters left in memory (not even bytes, as it was an octal machine). Every change that needed making required my determining how much memory it would take and then go looking for it. In 1967, memory cost 10's of thousands of dollars per K and tapes were $50 each. Disks were coming in but had very low capacity. We became very good at saving memory and tape/disk space.

    So, yes we knew and did think the programs would not be around in 2000 and I find it difficult to believe that those that I wrote, back then, were, but, later, when resources became cheaper, companies were still reluctant to pay and programmers still kept up their bad habits.
    ananve likes this.
    08-04-2016 03:05 PM
  6. rhapdog's Avatar
    You are partially correct. I was writing mainframe programs in the 60's. The real reason we used 6 character dates, back then, was that we couldn't afford not to. Memory, then, was in K (!).
    Right you are. Sometimes we forget things in our old age. ;) I had to write computer programs on paper and then the assigned person would "input" the program I wrote. Then I would wait for a printout so that I could see it worked as expected, or not. You pretty much had to "run the program" with pencil and paper to make sure everything should work as expected before turning it in, because computer time was so valuable. If you wrote a sloppy program, or a bloated program, you were terminated for it.

    I'm glad to be retired and staying home now.
    libra89 and ananve like this.
    08-04-2016 06:27 PM
  7. DavidinCT's Avatar
    As some of you may already know, the "Year 2038 Problem" refers to a predicted event in which many (if not all) 32-bit devices will stop working due to a bug with the UNIX timestamp. However, Windows 10 Mobile is currently 32-bit. If I got a Windows 10 Mobile phone (with a 64-bit processor like the 950 or 950 XL, so that a 32-bit processor wouldn't be an issue), would the fact that Windows 10 Mobile is 32-bit mean that it would stop working in 2038?
    OH NO THE WORLD IS ENDING !

    Really ? If you still have your 950XL or 950 in 2038, I would be impressed but, I would put a sum of money up that you wont be using it. Most people don't hold on to their phones more than 2-3 years, even the hold outs to refuse to upgrade for 10 years, I don't see this becoming a problem.

    Now if you said the issue was in 2020....there might be an issue but, 2038, I think your a little out there even bringing up this subject..... Again I bet 99% of people on this site will NOT be using the same phone they are now in 2038....
    08-04-2016 06:58 PM
  8. gbm97's Avatar
    I'm a die hard Insider.
    I wont be here but a solar powered charger can be hooked up, providing the undertaker doesn't steal it.
    rhapdog likes this.
    08-04-2016 10:23 PM
  9. rhapdog's Avatar
    Again I bet 99% of people on this site will NOT be using the same phone they are now in 2038....
    LOL.

    99% means 1 out of every hundred people would be using the same phone. Out of a million people, that's 10,000 people using the same phone in 22 years.

    That would be like me using my first "mobile" phone.
    openbriefcase.jpg

    Just like the radio for this phone is no longer compatible with current networks, I would imagine with roll out of 5G or 6G that current phones won't be compatible with newer networks in 2038.
    DavidinCT, libra89 and ananve like this.
    08-05-2016 08:32 AM
  10. DavidinCT's Avatar
    Yea for sure. I said 99% because of some of the fanboys who love their phone and would take offence to that statement. I would bet it's over 99.9999999% and there will be one guy/gal who figures out to mod a old device to make it work (retro stuff). Even toi work on a OLD N wi-fi network (think of how wi-fi will change in 22 years)

    So it's 2016... in 22 years (2038), does anyone think a phone of today will be compatable with any networks when we are on 12g (or what ever it's called in 22 years) ?

    Think of what type of phones we had 10 years ago, how about 15 years ? Yea, not much to really talk about there. In 22 years, everything will be completly different.

    The market and tech changes too fast to be using a current device in 22 years from now... If they will even work (on networks, batteries or sources for replacement parts, etc) then...

    Maybe by then they will come up with some tech that makes a battery in a phone last LONGER than a day or 2..... sigh....a week or a month would be nice.
    libra89 and ananve like this.
    08-05-2016 08:40 AM
  11. PGrey's Avatar
    The battery thing is a good point, I'm sure tech will have advanced dramatically, and not to mention the zillions of security issues you'd have, using a 950 in 2038, long after its sunset timeframe.
    Look at the 2G AT&T sunset going at EOY, some of those phones aren't that old (most are though, realistically), certainly not 22 years. I'm sure we'll be on 7G or LTE-8 or whatever by then, and 75 or 150mbps will seem like snails-pace, more or less like dial-up does now...

    Right you are. Sometimes we forget things in our old age. ;) I had to write computer programs on paper and then the assigned person would "input" the program I wrote. Then I would wait for a printout so that I could see it worked as expected, or not. You pretty much had to "run the program" with pencil and paper to make sure everything should work as expected before turning it in, because computer time was so valuable. If you wrote a sloppy program, or a bloated program, you were terminated for it.

    I'm glad to be retired and staying home now.
    I sort of caught the tail-end of that era, my first CS class we ran stuff on the VAX mostly, and wrote system code on the PDP-11's, for exclusive use.
    My first year, we had to batch our jobs, and wait for them to run, and then pick up our print-outs, to debug. The next year, we finally got console redirection, and could view everything on-screen, how cool was that. And then we got Apollo computers to do our 3D modeling classes on, man I spent some long nights working on my splines, fractals, and pages and pages of matrix math ;-]
    Last edited by xandros9; 08-05-2016 at 04:51 PM.
    rhapdog likes this.
    08-05-2016 01:19 PM
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