06-16-2017 07:08 PM
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  1. Drael646464's Avatar
    Do you have an official quote about RS3 coming to W10M?
    Redstone 3 is now the Windows 10 'Fall Creators Update'
    "Instead, currently supported (Redstone 2) smartphones will be getting 'feature2' updates, which does include updates to core security, networking, encryption, Cortana, Edge, and so on...."
    "As we release new builds from our Development Branch for PC, we will also be doing the same for Windows 10 Mobile just like we have been in the past. However, Windows Insiders will likely notice some minor differences. The biggest difference being that the build number and branch won’t match the builds we will be releasing for PC. This is a result of more work we’re doing to converge code into*OneCore*– the heart of Windows across PC, tablet, phone, IoT,*HoloLens, Xbox and more as we continue to develop new improvements for Windows 10 Mobile and our enterprise customers."

    http://winsupersite.com/creators-upd...-are-narrowing

    That's been the explaination dan has also received from his insiders, that as I said, the split is temporary while they work on onecore, and will converge when that work is done.

    I think this also makes sense in light of their "stripping windows mobile for parts" in preparation for windows on arm. If those things become part of the coreOS, they will have to be "stripped out" of the non one core stuff from mobile/adjusted.
    05-12-2017 06:31 AM
  2. Drael646464's Avatar
    I thinks rs3 will not coming to even support phones and windows 10 arm is the future of windows phone ,Microsoft may show full windows 10 on phone in may 23 event

    Sent from mTalk
    I doubt it. Its possible I suppose, but they have already said officially that the first windows on arm device comes late this year, and that they'll be focusing on tablets/servers primarily. Windows 10 mobile is extremely battery efficient compared to the desktopOS. The desktop OS will need cshell AND battery optimisation to get onto a phone AND they'll need a need form factor for it.

    Not impossible, but at this point seems very unlikely. AND there's the problem of budget devices. Premium smartphone sales are dipping. They can't just release a new mobile OS on premium only hardware at this point in the market.

    I have zero doubts about them eventually doing this. It would make EXCELLENT sense once UWP is built up via 's' and 'windows on arm' on tablets. But I don't think the timing is right, even if they had the device ready. The tablets should come first.

    That said, I have literally no idea what this "next" thing is they are releasing. Its not SP, SB, mixed reality, invoke or any of the usual suspects.
    05-12-2017 06:37 AM
  3. faisalbaba's Avatar
    I doubt it. Its possible I suppose, but they have already said officially that the first windows on arm device comes late this year, and that they'll be focusing on tablets/servers primarily. Windows 10 mobile is extremely battery efficient compared to the desktopOS. The desktop OS will need cshell AND battery optimisation to get onto a phone AND they'll need a need form factor for it.

    Not impossible, but at this point seems very unlikely. AND there's the problem of budget devices. Premium smartphone sales are dipping. They can't just release a new mobile OS on premium only hardware at this point in the market.

    I have zero doubts about them eventually doing this. It would make EXCELLENT sense once UWP is built up via 's' and 'windows on arm' on tablets. But I don't think the timing is right, even if they had the device ready. The tablets should come first.

    That said, I have literally no idea what this "next" thing is they are releasing. Its not SP, SB, mixed reality, invoke or any of the usual suspects.
    You are right but anything can happen.

    Sent from mTalk
    05-12-2017 06:46 AM
  4. milkyway's Avatar
    "As we release new builds from our Development Branch for PC, we will also be doing the same for Windows 10 Mobile just like we have been in the past. However, Windows Insiders will likely notice some minor differences. The biggest difference being that the build number and branch won’t match the builds we will be releasing for PC. This is a result of more work we’re doing to converge code into*OneCore*– the heart of Windows across PC, tablet, phone, IoT,*HoloLens, Xbox and more as we continue to develop new improvements for Windows 10 Mobile and our enterprise customers."

    http://winsupersite.com/creators-upd...-are-narrowing

    That's been the explaination dan has also received from his insiders, that as I said, the split is temporary while they work on onecore, and will converge when that work is done.

    I think this also makes sense in light of their "stripping windows mobile for parts" in preparation for windows on arm. If those things become part of the coreOS, they will have to be "stripped out" of the non one core stuff from mobile/adjusted.
    That's a very old quote and nowhere does it state that it is just temporary. WinBeta recent speculations point out that W10M will get the features of the Creators Update (night light and custom accent picker) with the "official feature2" update but that's it.
    05-12-2017 06:47 AM
  5. Drael646464's Avatar
    That's a very old quote and nowhere does it state that it is just temporary. WinBeta recent speculations point out that W10M will get the features of the Creators Update (night light and custom accent picker) with the "official feature2" update but that's it.
    How old is feature2? I thought it was only recent.

    Dan, from this site, says his insiders have confirmed that feature2 is temporary. His sources have been right on many things, he seems very confident in it, and personally I trust his word more than speculation that seems to spread like old wives tales. He's hardly overly optimistic about windows 10 mobile either, in its current state, in fact constantly pessimistic and critical, depressingly so, so I wouldn't consider him positively biased.

    It's not actually that atypical a thing to do, to split branches like this. They often do it, when they want to delay features, market test them, or practically test them before release. In this case the stated reason was made reasonably clear for the split.

    Reading into it, like people are, is a little like reading into a change in the direction of the wind IMO.

    I am pretty sure it makes zero logical sense to dump windows 10 mobile, commercially - windows on arm is not a suitable replacement for a smartphone platform - it would require major UI changes, and major battery optimisation and clearly won't be ready in that sense for about two years - I mean its not even ready for release on tablets right now.

    MS clearly wants windows to be the one OS that rules them all (what multi-billion OS software maker wouldn't!), and while mobile isn't a winner right now, there is no lost profit, or money, so why beat a retreat?

    If they were hemorraging money I'd understand, but that are still making in the millions (yes chump change for them, but people would lose/invest money for the sort of opportunity that could later represent - blackberry spent years burning cash on bb10 just to get a shot, and if your still actually making money however "small", whats the big deal?)

    If I were Microsoft, I would see windows 10 mobile as a sort of side project. Not a major cash earner, and not an end goal, yet, but something that pays for its own investment, and could open doors later when the pieces are in place.

    The actual install base isn't tiny either. It's something between 1 and 2.5% of around 1-2 billion smartphones (actual install base, the relevant number for software, is harder to estimate than marketshare/sales). Some of those customers being key enterprise users, the sort that MS earns its big money via azure from.

    Anyway, it says:

    "This is a result of more work we’re doing to converge code into*OneCore*– the heart of Windows across PC, tablet, phone, IoT,*HoloLens, Xbox and more as we continue to develop new improvements for Windows 10 Mobile and our enterprise customers."

    If you don't trust MSFTs announcements, why would you trust any newer ones on the topic more?

    If you have that much distrust, no statement or announcement will ever be enough.
    Last edited by Drael646464; 05-12-2017 at 07:48 AM.
    05-12-2017 07:18 AM
  6. milkyway's Avatar
    I still don't see the official statement that RS3 will come to W10M. Your quote says "we continue to develop new improvements" - this could mean that W10M will receive only security patches (and maybe performance improvements).

    I think W10onARM will come with RS3 in fall and this will be the "official" end of W10M. W10M will continue to get this performance and security patches (feature 3 and 4?). MS cannot compete with cheap smartphones anyway because you have Android phones in this market.
    They will bring the Ultra Mobile Surface (or whatever it will be called) with W10oA to the market in 2018 and it will be positioned not as a phone, but as something else. MS will say "You can buy a smartphone (iOS or Android), or you can buy a ultramobile PC that is able to take calls".
    Their won't be any new W10M (at least not from MS). Maybe HP, Alcatel, .... will put something to the market. The Surface Mobile will have awesome hardware and will be very expensive.

    These are my predictions ;)



    Anyways, not later than September/October we will see if W10M will get "RS3"
    dorelse likes this.
    05-12-2017 10:22 AM
  7. dorelse's Avatar
    The writing is on the wall. Regardless of what they do (or don't do with WM10), Win10 on ARM is the direction. Lumia 950/XL will be 2 years old this fall, they can sunset support saying they fully supported the devices as promised. They'll have to continue life support, um, support for the HP Elite X3 & Alcatel IDOL 4S / Pro models on the 'Feature 2 branch for a bit longer.

    A new Surface 'mobile' device will emerge next Fall or Spring running a Qualcomm 835 (or later) Chip, and 3rd party vendor support will emerge (hopefully) with a myriad of devices & form factors...hopefully a few phones crop up too.

    They're hoping that Windows S & UWP finally take off which will start to finally get the store ramping up, and bring 'mobile' (don't call them phones) back out of the shadows.

    They'll claim we'll get RS3, but it'll be just like we got the Creators Update..a 7.5 to 7.8 update that gives us very few new features, while still calling it RS3.

    That's my prediction of the vision.
    05-12-2017 11:07 AM
  8. Drael646464's Avatar
    I still don't see the official statement that RS3 will come to W10M. Your quote says "we continue to develop new improvements" - this could mean that W10M will receive only security patches (and maybe performance improvements).

    I think W10onARM will come with RS3 in fall and this will be the "official" end of W10M. W10M will continue to get this performance and security patches (feature 3 and 4?). MS cannot compete with cheap smartphones anyway because you have Android phones in this market.
    They will bring the Ultra Mobile Surface (or whatever it will be called) with W10oA to the market in 2018 and it will be positioned not as a phone, but as something else. MS will say "You can buy a smartphone (iOS or Android), or you can buy a ultramobile PC that is able to take calls".
    Their won't be any new W10M (at least not from MS). Maybe HP, Alcatel, .... will put something to the market. The Surface Mobile will have awesome hardware and will be very expensive.

    These are my predictions ;)



    Anyways, not later than September/October we will see if W10M will get "RS3"
    Well it explains the reason for the branching (to work on onecore). Working on onecore isn't an eternal project, hence its logical that mobile will be folded back in, based on what they have said.

    They need apps before that would be a wise move. Better to establish LTE/calling cheap windows tablets first, to lay the groundwork IMO, as they have stated they are doing with windows on arm. They have also stated "mobile phones are not a priority right now'.

    Also battery optimisation would need to come a long way, and cshell would need to be completely finished, before any smartphone - with would also require a piece of hardware with a new form factor, according the satya. And such new high end arm chips are expensive - in the current market condition you need budget models.

    I might be wrong, and maybe the whole thing is some elaborate bluff just to throw people off the scent, and they've been working on surface phone all this time. It'll probably happen eventually, but I suspect you might be being optimistic on the timing.
    05-12-2017 11:25 AM
  9. Cruncher04's Avatar
    Windows 10 mobile is extremely battery efficient compared to the desktopOS.
    What evidence do you have for this claim? I'd say evidence points to the contrary.
    milkyway likes this.
    05-12-2017 12:04 PM
  10. Drael646464's Avatar
    What evidence do you have for this claim? I'd say evidence points to the contrary.
    The desktop OS, like all desktop OSes is a real-time multi-tasking environment. The mobile OS, like all mobile OSes, isn't. The desktop OS is an environment that runs unlimited services, the mobile OS, like all mobile OSes runs limited services.

    Even comparing windows 10 mobile, to android - android runs quite a few tasks in memory, unless it runs out, windows 10 mobile freezes any app you leave (like iOS).

    Windows 10 mobile in this sense, is on the stricter side of battery preservation, like iOS.

    No doubt MS intends to solve this gap, and bridge it long term, as they are re-introducing throttling, but for all day battery life on a smartphone they will need to further cap multi-tasking, and limit services etc to make it operate competitively with the likes of iOS and windows 10 mobile, or android (which uses the ram management service to limit active programs).

    Basically speaking, mobile OSes are built from the ground up with battery in mind. Windows 10 has been more retrofitted with battery management, and primarily for laptops and tablets which have larger battery, and usually lack always connected LTE services.
    05-12-2017 09:34 PM
  11. Cruncher04's Avatar
    The desktop OS, like all desktop OSes is a real-time multi-tasking environment. The mobile OS, like all mobile OSes, isn't.
    Windows is no real-time OS. In addition Androids multi-tasking features are very similar to Windows as it has Linux under the hood...very unlike the crippled multi-tasking under Windows Mobile.
    In any case, there is no evidence that Windows Mobile saves a significant amount of power versus Android or Windows.
    In fact the Surface 2 with Desktop Windows was as power efficient as any Android device of similar spec.
    05-12-2017 09:40 PM
  12. Drael646464's Avatar
    Windows is no real-time OS. In addition Androids multi-tasking features are very similar to Windows as it has Linux under the hood...very unlike the crippled multi-tasking under Windows Mobile.
    In any case, there is no evidence that Windows Mobile saves a significant amount of power versus Android or Windows.
    In fact the Surface 2 with Desktop Windows was as power efficient as any Android device of similar spec.
    Windows 10 home and pro, are definitely real-time multi-tasking environments. Whereas iOS and Windows 10 mobile, err on the side of battery preservation by freezing unused apps (Android is somewhere in the middle).

    This is also why Windows 10 mobile and iOS operates on lower RAM than Windows 10 desktop, or Android.

    There is no common comparison of mobile OS battery life and desktop OS battery life. Smartphones have always connected connectivity.

    For a fair comparison, you'd need a windows 10 tablet, with the same mAH as a smartphone running windows 10 mobile, and they'd both need LTE and calling. That doesn't exist until windows on ARM is released, as windows devices that come with LTE are data only, and not "always connected".

    The surface pro isn't a great comparison point with android either - android devices don't come with things like full SSD, high end intel processors, or cooling systems

    AFAIK what you are asking for doesn't exist, and its not an easy comparison to make.

    But it should be logical, from the build of mobile stacks, that windows 10 on desktop is not designed the same way.

    If indeed, as you claim, this doesn't improve battery life, then every mobile OS that exists is designed wrong, and should not be freezing apps or limiting services at all. And perhaps that is truer now in the age of increased ram, bigger batteries, bigger screens, larger CPUs (ie larger hardware power draw) than it was in smartphones early days IDK.

    Still seems logical to me however, that limiting running apps, and services would preserve battery life, and throttling should only go so far. The depth of this effect remains to be seen, given the lack of ability to make easy comparisons.

    And if it turns out you are right, android, ios, and windows 10 mobile should all be re-designed to incorporate throttling instead of service and task limitations and dev guidelines. That would be an interesting thing, if it turned out to be true, as essentially every mobile OS that exists would be "out of date" compared with the hardware.
    05-12-2017 10:55 PM
  13. Cruncher04's Avatar
    My point of comparison was Surface 2 (not Surface Pro) running Windows on ARM (aka Windows RT) compared to Android Tablets of similar spec. The very same Android which also runs on phones. This proves that Windows itself is not less power efficient than a more limited and mobile oriented OS.

    If indeed, as you claim, this doesn't improve battery life, then every mobile OS that exists is designed wrong, and should not be freezing apps or limiting services at all.
    First of all, it is a "feature" of Windows Mobile and to some extend iOS to suspend user threads as they get into background and not of "every mobile OS". Second I indeed do think that it just limits the user. There is no inherent power saving of that "feature". Every well written application does suspend itself if there is no work to do. If they have work to do in the background there is a reason for it. I see not a single reason to enforce suspension at OS level.

    Still seems logical to me however, that limiting running apps, and services would preserve battery life, and throttling should only go so far. The depth of this effect remains to be seen, given the lack of ability to make easy comparisons.
    See, here is your mistake. You assume apps, for which suspension is enforced would actually do something (e.g. using processing resources) if pushed to the background and suspension is not enforced.
    Such a limitation however would just rule out certain classes of application, which have to do something in the background.
    Make no mistake, i did not claim, that if an application uses processing resources in the background, that power consumption is not increased.

    And if it turns out you are right, android, ios, and windows 10 mobile should all be re-designed to incorporate throttling instead of service and task limitations and dev guidelines.
    That not a question of re-design but the removal of relatively simple policy.
    Point in case for Win32 apps suspension is not enforced, while for WinRT (aka UWP apps) suspension is enforced using the very same OS scheduler.
    By the way, i am all for dev guidelines instead of enforcement at OS level.
    05-13-2017 06:23 AM
  14. Drael646464's Avatar
    First of all, it is a "feature" of Windows Mobile and to some extend iOS to suspend user threads as they get into background and not of "every mobile OS".
    It's a feature of android, ios, and windows 10 mobile to suspend apps. Android does it via the ram management service, and is thus quasi-RT, the rest just suspended, outside of specific exceptions. Depending on Ram useage etc. Basically the OS decides on your behalf what to suspend (based on settings given by the manufacturer).

    BB10 is realtime, because its based on QNX, and there might be others but I suppose by "every mobile OS" I meant "Every mobile OS that has more than 0.1 marketshare". Android is slightly different, but its also not free of app suspension. It's something in between.

    Second I indeed do think that it just limits the user. There is no inherent power saving of that "feature". Every well written application does suspend itself if there is no work to do.
    I'll probably convert to Christianity the moment I find just one well written application on a mobile platform :P j/k

    But if your right, android, ios and windows 10 mobile should all change their play and stop suspending apps. There's no need to conservatively manage ram so intensely really any more given we are averaging 2-4 gb now on such a lightweight platform with largely lightweight apps. They could just handle ram like windows does, caching actively and dynamically to disk, rather than hibernating apps.

    See, here is your mistake. You assume apps, for which suspension is enforced would actually do something (e.g. using processing resources) if pushed to the background and suspension is not enforced.
    Depends on the app. Also on what the user wants. Some may want youtube to keep playing, some might find it really annoying.

    When I open multiple youtube windows in edge, they all play at once, because google doesn't write to the html5 standard properly (they only suspend automatically in chromium). That kind gets my goat. I never use youtube for podcasts etc, so I never want youtube to play when its not active. Some people may want the opposite.

    Such a limitation however would just rule out certain classes of application, which have to do something in the background.
    Make no mistake, i did not claim, that if an application uses processing resources in the background, that power consumption is not increased.
    Right.

    Honestly I'm not happy with the way any of the mobile OSes do it myself. I think it should be a setting the user can control if the dev wants to code it.

    Same with running services - not everyone wants facebook notification updates for example, and they are a known battery drain. I'd rather only hear from messenger, and have the FB service completely switched off.

    That not a question of re-design but the removal of relatively simple policy.
    Point in case for Win32 apps suspension is not enforced, while for WinRT (aka UWP apps) suspension is enforced using the very same OS scheduler.
    Well that helps that its easy to code then, within windows.
    Last edited by Drael646464; 05-13-2017 at 07:10 AM.
    05-13-2017 06:57 AM
  15. Cruncher04's Avatar
    Depends on the app. Also on what the user wants. Some may want youtube to keep playing, some might find it really annoying.
    See, here the problem starts. The OS has no clue what the user wants. If the user started a video, the associated semantic would be to play the video until end. When moving a process to the background, the OS should never assume that the user wants to have that process suspended. Instead the user should just stop the video or close the tab.

    In addition this can be handled on application level since applications getting a notification, when moved to the background. A particular application might just decide to stop a certain job when moved to background.

    There's no need to conservatively manage ram so intensely really any more given we are averaging 2-4 gb now on such a lightweight platform with largely lightweight apps. They could just handle ram like windows does, caching actively and dynamically to disk, rather than hibernating apps.
    I was only talking suspension (e.g. app is not scheduled for execution anymore) not about RAM management. Hibernation to disk is another topic. Issue is, WinRT apps are just suspended even if there is no need for hibernation.

    Same with running services - not everyone wants facebook notification updates for example, and they are a known battery drain. I'd rather only hear from messenger, and have the FB service completely switched off.
    You always have the option to shut down a service (or to stop an app for that matter) manually.

    In any case the vast majority of apps would just naturally suspend if there is no user input so they would be suspended anyway in the background, because there simply are no events coming in.
    Then there are application, which are supposed to do a certain job, which needs to finish independent of any events. As example if i want to compile 500 files it would take a while and my expectation is, that compilation completes in the background.
    Then there are applications, which are dependent on external events (e.g. no user input). These external events could be timers or coming from the network stack. Example of these type would be music players, gps navigation apps etc.
    Finally you have application, which would naturally suspend due to synchronization with some hardware mechanism. Example would be games, which are suspended while waiting for the GPU to finish the presentation.

    In all these cases i do not see a single reason, why the OS should enforce suspension when pushed to background.
    05-14-2017 04:59 AM
  16. Drael646464's Avatar
    See, here the problem starts. The OS has no clue what the user wants. If the user started a video, the associated semantic would be to play the video until end. When moving a process to the background, the OS should never assume that the user wants to have that process suspended. Instead the user should just stop the video or close the tab.
    I don't reckon neither the OS nor the developer should be able to make the assumption.

    Its more convenient to me, for the video to just automatically pause when I switch tasks. Its smoother for me. Just like when a skype call comes in and it pauses the music. IS there also ever a reason why someone would listen to music AND youtube at the same time? Yet, it happens. Theoretically I could pause the music, but I don't see I should have to, any more than someone else should have to have it stop if they want to keep listening to their podcast whilst browsing.

    I believe this thing should be user controlled, not developer or OS controlled. Ie settings controlled behaviour. Only the user knows what he wants an app to do when he shifts. If the devs can't put this in their app, perhaps the OS makers can. Either way, I'd prefer to have apps behave the way I'd personally like them to.

    I was only talking suspension (e.g. app is not scheduled for execution anymore) not about RAM management. Hibernation to disk is another topic. Issue is, WinRT apps are just suspended even if there is no need for hibernation.
    Meh, its related IMO. If you have a phone with 4gb of ram, I don't really see why tasks should be suspended at the whim of the OS. If there's something you don't use often, but want to have run quickly and be more accessible for example. Or at least I see them as related. It's not RT, its quasi-RT. Windows doesn't manage its ram that way, it caches it in and out, on demand. But perhaps if we discuss that its too much of a tangent :P

    You always have the option to shut down a service (or to stop an app for that matter) manually.
    Okay, so lets say I have facebook installed on an android phone. If I stop the facebook service, and I load FB, the service will reload. In general the android system does not like you messing with services, or force closing apps, nor do the apps themselves. All in the name of 'the best possible experience". And what about ios - can you even kill services manually? Windows phone? IDK.

    Even in use cases where that works - this seems like a messy and complicated solution for something that could be very easy, just preventing the app from running, or only letting it run when the app is open. I know folks like google will never do this, but I could do this in desktop windows 10 by disabling the service.

    In any case the vast majority of apps would just naturally suspend if there is no user input so they would be suspended anyway in the background, because there simply are no events coming in.
    The always connected quality of mobile apps means they usually keep running services, and those services keep updating the app system. I think probably the overall load of most apps is quite small though.

    Then there are application, which are supposed to do a certain job, which needs to finish independent of any events. As example if i want to compile 500 files it would take a while and my expectation is, that compilation completes in the background.
    Then there are applications, which are dependent on external events (e.g. no user input). These external events could be timers or coming from the network stack. Example of these type would be music players, gps navigation apps etc.
    Finally you have application, which would naturally suspend due to synchronization with some hardware mechanism. Example would be games, which are suspended while waiting for the GPU to finish the presentation.

    In all these cases i do not see a single reason, why the OS should enforce suspension when pushed to background.
    I agree with all these case examples. There will be absolutely people who want to do those things.

    Although I'm not generally the sort of person to compile 500 files on my smartphone, or browse/text while following GPS nagivation instructions, and every mobile OS supports background music play, Ive had a 100% real-time OS in bb10 for awhile, and honestly I've never found any benefit in it. Years of use, and not a single instance comes to mind.

    I'm reminded of someone who was moving from bb10, who was complaining about the limited realtime emulation (and complete lack of in ios), saying he'd like everything he's doing to be real-time, all the time. Most people were just stratching their head wondering why he would care, but he had loads of specific examples, he was a very busy worker on his phone, and he had his reasons.

    Or the fellow on here that was complaining that windows 10 mobile didn't keep playing youtube when he was doing something else.

    Or even my issue with loading multiple youtube tabs in edge on desktop, and having them all play at once.

    There's a lot of different user behaviours and needs out there and there's a lot of different software playing together. So for me, my ideal system rests somewhere in between, and something that doesn't exist.

    I don't know if I'll ever get exactly what I want, because mobile OSes tend to be hand holders, not bastions of freedom and settings, but perhaps if WoA ever comes to mobile way down the track I'll be able to get close (by disabling services, and shifting battery management settings)
    Last edited by Drael646464; 05-14-2017 at 07:34 AM.
    xandros9 likes this.
    05-14-2017 07:19 AM
  17. Sedp23's Avatar
    Didn't see any c shell

    Sent from Idol 4s
    05-14-2017 09:11 PM
  18. Drael646464's Avatar
    Didn't see any c shell

    Sent from Idol 4s
    Yup, I was wrong (on cshell @ build). We did however get Cortana skills api. I've yet to hear about anyone trying the preview much.
    05-14-2017 09:43 PM
  19. Drael646464's Avatar
    That's a very old quote and nowhere does it state that it is just temporary. WinBeta recent speculations point out that W10M will get the features of the Creators Update (night light and custom accent picker) with the "official feature2" update but that's it.
    https://www.onmsft.com/news/windows-...for-enterprise

    Apparently mobile is getting some enterprise focused updates in the FCU. Remains to be seen what they are, or what else we will get, but at least its on the cards mobile will get some features.
    05-22-2017 09:54 PM
  20. PerfectReign's Avatar
    The odd thing is that we insiders would see these features but we don't.

    Just need Astoria.

    Sent from mTalk
    05-22-2017 10:21 PM
  21. Drael646464's Avatar
    The odd thing is that we insiders would see these features but we don't.

    Just need Astoria.

    Sent from mTalk
    Usually feature2 is used to delay features whilst work is done elsewhere, or testing is completed. Possibly all features on 10m, are being stalled until onecore is complete, and mobile is merged back into the main development branch? But who really knows what's happening in the dev's offices.

    They keep it tight lipped, I'll give them that.
    Charis Ntouroutlis likes this.
    05-22-2017 10:37 PM
  22. milkyway's Avatar
    https://www.onmsft.com/news/windows-...for-enterprise

    Apparently mobile is getting some enterprise focused updates in the FCU. Remains to be seen what they are, or what else we will get, but at least its on the cards mobile will get some features.
    Brandon said "in the late summer". That would be before the FCU hits. So I think this will be part of the feature2 update
    05-23-2017 02:09 AM
  23. Drael646464's Avatar
    Brandon said "in the late summer". That would be before the FCU hits. So I think this will be part of the feature2 update
    I'm not American, so I don't really know when later summer is.

    But if were part of feature2, that would seem to defeat the point of splitting the dev branches temporarily for work on one core. Ie, if they could still add features and continue work on mobile features, there would be no point in splitting the branches, and stalling and delaying feature updates that were already supposed to come to mobile.
    Splitting branches like this is almost always to delay features for testing, or other code work.

    When is late summer for the US, in a few months?

    Guess perhaps the delayed features are already baked, and they are just waiting for the one core dev branch re-merger, to implement and test. Ie, they have the features baked, and are just waiting on the new one core to bake, to put the two together and merge the dev branches back.

    If that's true, we should see some insiders action before release, indeed, if that's true we should see the work on one core complete in about a month or so.

    That would be kinda nice because it would suck for mobile to get behind things like timeline, and Cortana skills, versus desktop. It would help if mobile was merged well before then, so there is a little time to get some of the FCU desktop features on mobile.
    05-23-2017 02:31 AM
  24. tgp's Avatar
    When is late summer for the US, in a few months?
    FWIW, summer officially ends and autumn begins on September 22, 2017 in the Northern Hemisphere.
    05-23-2017 06:58 AM
  25. milkyway's Avatar
    So it's official now: W10M will end with feature 2
    https://www.neowin.net/news/microsof...eature2-branch
    redmisfitx likes this.
    06-15-2017 02:40 AM
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