The Windows 10 April 2018 update has arrived! Get the new Dell XPS 15, starting at $999.99
  1. runamuck83's Avatar
    We don't have Windows 10 Mobile officially released yet - but I've noticed on a few occasions where the "mobile" app will be updated while the "desktop" app will not and vice versa.

    I thought these universal apps were the SAME app? How/why are they updated separately?
    09-16-2015 07:24 AM
  2. milkyway's Avatar
    I'm not a developer but my understanding is this: A UAP (e.g. MS weather app) uses the same baseline but a different UI and/or customizations for every device. You write your code and when it comes to compiling you have to choose for which device you want to compile you UAP. If you don't have anything new in your code that's relevant for the W10 mobile you maybe just want to compile it for W10 desktop.

    Please someone correct me if I'm wrong
    09-16-2015 01:04 PM
  3. xandros9's Avatar
    Some of them are, not necessarily all of them.
    09-16-2015 01:14 PM
  4. a5cent's Avatar
    I'm not a developer but my understanding is this: A UAP (e.g. MS weather app) uses the same baseline but a different UI and/or customizations for every device. You write your code and when it comes to compiling you have to choose for which device you want to compile you UAP. If you don't have anything new in your code that's relevant for the W10 mobile you maybe just want to compile it for W10 desktop.

    Please someone correct me if I'm wrong
    No. That's how it worked on WP8.1. Now you have one app that you only compile once. That single app can decide at runtime which UI configuration to use to create the app's UI.

    However, this ability existing doesn't mean developers must use it. MS defines a universal app as any app that runs on the UAP, but that doesn't guarantee the app will run on more than one form factor. A developer can still limit an app to running on just one form factor, e.g. if the developer has no interest in designing multiple UI confugurations.
    Last edited by a5cent; 09-17-2015 at 05:51 AM. Reason: formatting only
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-16-2015 02:43 PM
  5. Daniel Rubino's Avatar
    I'm not a developer but my understanding is this: A UAP (e.g. MS weather app) uses the same baseline but a different UI and/or customizations for every device. You write your code and when it comes to compiling you have to choose for which device you want to compile you UAP. If you don't have anything new in your code that's relevant for the W10 mobile you maybe just want to compile it for W10 desktop.
    This is correct.

    Also, some companies are holding back on Windows 10 Mobile because it's a beta OS. There's not much point in releasing an app on buggy software, especially when it is such a little audience.
    09-16-2015 04:01 PM
  6. a5cent's Avatar
    ^ As long as the developer isn't targeting a particular CPU architecture, the part about compilation is incorrect.

    Thanks to the extensibility of the UAP, you can include device-specific code in a single binary that will run on every device.
    source on MSDN

    Compilation is what results in the executable binary file. Ending up with a single binary means you compile once. If we have only one binary executable that runs on multiple form factors, then the OP is correct to assume that updating a universal app in the store, should update that app for all form factors simultaneously, not individually like the OP has observed.
    Last edited by a5cent; 09-17-2015 at 06:20 AM. Reason: added quote and URL
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-16-2015 04:05 PM
  7. a5cent's Avatar
    Saying that some companies are holding back on W10M is certainly true, but I don't think it answers the question as to why universal apps appear to be updated individually by form factor. A few examples:

    1)
    Testing may be one reason. If you fixed a critical bug that only rears its head on smartphones, and you want to deploy the fix quickly, it may be worthwhile to make that release available only to phones until you've had time to fully test it for tablets and other form factors.

    2)
    A less dramatic and very common scenario is when a universal app makes use of existing software components which themselves aren't universal. An app that uses one library which exists in two versions, one for ARM devices and the other for x86 devices, is a very common example. Any app that uses such libraries, even if it is a universal app, must be packaged up twice, once for each CPU instruction architecture.

    3)
    Another example would be that of a universal app that is not a W10 universal app, but a W8.1 universal app, where things work differently (the way milkyway described). In this case the only thing that is truly universal is the app's identity in the store, whereas the binary files that are distributed to devices vary depending on the device doing the downloading. Both types of apps are called universal apps, despite not technically being the same thing.

    I'm sure there are many more scenarios where a universal app wouldn't strictly behave like one (as described by the OP).
    Last edited by a5cent; 09-18-2015 at 06:30 AM. Reason: formatting only
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-17-2015 06:05 AM
  8. someone2639's Avatar
    I think it's just the C++ libraries on each device interpreting the apps differently.
    09-17-2015 06:09 AM
  9. a5cent's Avatar
    ^ Yeah, that's the second reason I mentioned above, but there's no way that's the only possible reason. There are just way too many factors that could cause a company to manage desktop/phone releases separately.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-17-2015 02:32 PM
  10. Zachary Boddy's Avatar
    Enjoyable thread. I don't have anything to add it's all been said already.
    Last edited by Zachary Boddy; 09-18-2015 at 06:25 AM. Reason: I added two whole words because I'm tired and my fingers are sausages.
    a5cent likes this.
    09-18-2015 06:25 AM
  11. a5cent's Avatar
    ^ May I say that your reason for editing made it that much more enjoyable?
    09-18-2015 06:28 AM
  12. Zachary Boddy's Avatar
    ^ May I say that your reason for editing made it that much more enjoyable?
    If you'll look at most of the posts where I edited they're all sarcastic comments. I can't be bothered to take my mistakes seriously, haha.
    a5cent likes this.
    09-18-2015 06:32 AM
  13. Krystianpants's Avatar
    Most of these apps in the store are 8.1 universal. They don't even sync settings between each other. Games require logging into facebook, etc..

    Now Candy crush is apparently universal but once again unless you login to facebook you don't sync any information. So I find that weird since the purpose of universal is to have the same app running on all systems and includes continuity. Yah if you have a facebook account.... hehe

    It's likely apps are being fubared because of the 2 stores that are being maintained. The new store is just going to be a nightmare with mix of 8.1 and 10 apps. And i believe anyone can continue publishing 8.1 universal apps to the new store. And by the time 10 is released and everyone is moved over, there will be more 8.1 apps than anything and of course Windows 10 as one service won't really even make sense given that you need to download separate apps and maintain them separately on each device. Microsoft will once again get a bad rep.
    09-18-2015 07:12 AM

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-10-2016, 11:51 PM
  2. How can I install apps offline in Windows phone 10?
    By Amal E S in forum Windows 10 Mobile
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-23-2015, 08:36 AM
  3. Examining how good Microsoft apps actually are on Android
    By WindowsCentral.com in forum Windows Central News Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-16-2015, 07:00 AM
  4. Is there a way to clear apps from your app library?
    By Windows Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-16-2015, 06:58 AM
  5. ...
    By ads13 in forum Applications
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-16-2015, 06:44 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD