1. AdrianG123's Avatar
    Is it real that now we dont have to really use the option of safely Remove Hardware ?
    What about the safety of the drive or gadget that we are using
    04-17-2019 03:44 PM
  2. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    I heard it's upcoming. I don't think it's been launched yet.
    Laura Knotek and ven07 like this.
    04-17-2019 04:22 PM
  3. Timbre70's Avatar
    Always better to safely remove.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    04-17-2019 07:13 PM
  4. ven07's Avatar
    I heard it's upcoming. I don't think it's been launched yet.
    I second this. I've read about it, but I don't believe that it has been implemented as of yet
    Guytronic likes this.
    04-18-2019 07:21 AM
  5. ven07's Avatar
    Always better to safely remove.
    While this is true for now, after the above mentioned implementation it will become redundant. As is stands not many people actually worry about 'safely removing' hardware. I'll admit that 2 out of 10 times I just remove my thumbdrives without actually taking the time to do a few extra clicks lol
    Guytronic likes this.
    04-18-2019 07:23 AM
  6. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    While this is true for now, after the above mentioned implementation it will become redundant. As is stands not many people actually worry about 'safely removing' hardware. I'll admit that 2 out of 10 times I just remove my thumbdrives without actually taking the time to do a few extra clicks lol
    Sometimes, I'm forced to. I do the safely remove device, and it gets stopped by the OS claiming that it's still in use. I for one will welcome this.
    ven07 likes this.
    04-18-2019 08:07 AM
  7. tgp's Avatar
    As is stands not many people actually worry about 'safely removing' hardware. I'll admit that 2 out of 10 times I just remove my thumbdrives without actually taking the time to do a few extra clicks lol
    I never worried about "safely removing hardware". I just pulled it out 10 out of 10 times! I am surprised that anyone regularly went through the steps to do it "safely".
    ven07 and techiez like this.
    04-18-2019 10:16 AM
  8. ven07's Avatar
    I never worried about "safely removing hardware". I just pulled it out 10 out of 10 times! I am surprised that anyone regularly went through the steps to do it "safely".
    I'm a weird person xd
    Guytronic likes this.
    04-19-2019 08:27 AM
  9. anthonyng's Avatar
    I run a VM with the vm disk on external. I need to make sure it's all shut down properly before removing lol
    04-19-2019 02:14 PM
  10. ven07's Avatar
    I run a VM with the vm disk on external.
    I didn't think about this :/ smart
    Guytronic likes this.
    04-20-2019 09:39 AM
  11. tgp's Avatar
    I'm a weird person xd


    While I don't "eject" a USB drive, I do make sure that it is finished writing. I think that's basically what "safely removing" does anyway; checks to make sure there's no reading or writing going on.

    I run a VM with the vm disk on external. I need to make sure it's all shut down properly before removing lol
    How well does this work? I would think it would be a bit slow.
    ven07 likes this.
    04-20-2019 03:28 PM
  12. anthonyng's Avatar

    How well does this work? I would think it would be a bit slow.
    For my purposes on a USB3.1 port, it's pretty fine. My external ssd is actually a bit faster than my laptop.

    I use it for demo environments baseline... To check back on oob functionality when compared to developed instances
    04-22-2019 03:57 PM
  13. ven07's Avatar
    While I don't "eject" a USB drive, I do make sure that it is finished writing. I think that's basically what "safely removing" does anyway; checks to make sure there's no reading or writing going on.
    Agreed (thanks for confirming, that I'm not super weird)
    Guytronic likes this.
    04-24-2019 07:53 AM
  14. technotic's Avatar
    Just to better explain what exactly the Safe Remove feature does. One of the ways that Windows is able to speed up disk writes is to use write caching. This is normally enabled on your internal drives, while not enabled on removable drives (the option used to be called Quick Removal, or something similar). In order for your applications to complete any save or disk writing operations, the write command must complete successfully. This message is only sent back once all of the data has been received. To help expedite this, Windows accepts and holds more data than can be written to the disk at that time. This extra, unwritten data is cached and is automatically written to the disk in the proper order, in the background, limited by the speed of the disk (mechanical hard drives have moving parts which means that a write head inside the disk has to move around, similar to a record player). Meanwhile, Windows has told your application that all of the data has been received and that the application may continue. Depending on the type and size of file transfer, and the speed of the disk, the cache may take longer than expected to complete. By now, you should grasp where I'm heading with this; f you remove the disk while there is still cached data to be written to the disk, it does not get written, and you end up with incomplete and broken files.

    TL;DR:
    Even though Windows may tell you that you finished writing data to a disk, it may still be writing some data in the background. If the disk is removed before all of this data is finished writing (known as a write cache), any incomplete files will be corrupt after removing the drive, and you may even end up with additional errors, depending on the file system type and the data that didn't get written to the disk.

    Also, files are "modified" when you open them in Windows. This is primarily true for NTFS. As long as the file remains open, even if you did not make any modifications to the file, Windows has already placed this file in an open state. If the file is not closed properly before the disk is removed, you could encounter errors with those files later on. You typically know that something happened when you see a folder with a name such as "found.000" or something similar, from the disk's root directory.



    So... safely removing the disk ensures that all write commands for that disk, have completed, and that there are no outstanding caches or buffers. It also ensures that any open files (and folders) are closed properly. Once it verifies that there are no open data streams for that drive, it safely unmounts the drive and you can then remove it.

    YOU SHOULD BE SAFE TO REMOVE A REMOVABLE DRIVE AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT HAVE ANY FILES OR FOLDERS OPEN (EVEN A WINDOWS EXPLORER WINDOW) AND YOUVE ALLOWED ENOUGH TIME FOR ANY RECENT SAVES TO COMPLETE. MOST OF THE TIME, YOU WILL NOT NOTICE ANY PROBLEMS EVEN IF YOU REMOVE THE DRIVE WITH OPEN FILES OR FOLDERS, BECAUSE WINDOWS AUTOMATICALLY FIXES THEM FOR YOU. BUT IT IS ALWAYS BEST TO SAFELY REMOVE THE DRIVE WHENEVER POSSIBLE.

    This is more technical than most people care to know, but for anyone curious, there you go. :)
    anthonyng and Timbre70 like this.
    05-28-2019 06:43 PM

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