1. mt1202's Avatar
    Pick your source.


    Google
    02-08-2012 12:24 PM
  2. palandri's Avatar
    A writer at the Wall Street Journal wrote about that. Here's the link to the thread:
    http://forums.windowscentral.com/off-topic/186873.htm
    02-08-2012 01:15 PM
  3. 1jaxstate1's Avatar
    The sad part about it is the way it is worded. He still has unlimited data, but now it's being throttled. The FCC should step in and do something to get this under control. If you go over by 1k, they charge you more. But if you only use 200M out of your 2G plan, guess what you get, nothing. Just another monthly bill.

    The carriers are constantly trying to sign up more and more users, but they are not pushing extra money into their networks that will be able to handle the load. IMO.
    02-08-2012 01:29 PM
  4. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    We have gone through all this a while back in the UK.

    The ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) stepped in and published it's guidlines on 'Unlimited' claims.

    "Unlimited" Broadband / Mobile Data Rules

    * The term "unlimited" can only be used if the customer incurs no additional charge or suspension of service as a consequence of exceeding a usage threshold associated with a Fair Usage Policy (FUP), a traffic management policy or similar.

    * Limitations that do affect the speed or usage of the service must also be moderate only and clearly explained in the advertisement.


    So in the UK now, you can't get away with saying your service is unlimited if you charge extra after any FUP applies and you MUST explain any limitations in your advertising clearly. It must NOT be in small print.

    Do AT&T mention their throttling / limits at all in any advertising ?

    The ASA have the power to impose huge fines if advertising rules are breached, and have done so.
    palandri likes this.
    02-08-2012 01:46 PM
  5. alpinestars1z's Avatar
    We have gone through all this a while back in the UK.

    The ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) stepped in and published it's guidlines on 'Unlimited' claims.

    "Unlimited" Broadband / Mobile Data Rules

    * The term "unlimited" can only be used if the customer incurs no additional charge or suspension of service as a consequence of exceeding a usage threshold associated with a Fair Usage Policy (FUP), a traffic management policy or similar.

    * Limitations that do affect the speed or usage of the service must also be moderate only and clearly explained in the advertisement.


    So in the UK now, you can't get away with saying your service is unlimited if you charge extra after any FUP applies and you MUST explain any limitations in your advertising clearly. It must NOT be in small print.

    Do AT&T mention their throttling / limits at all in any advertising ?

    The ASA have the power to impose huge fines if advertising rules are breached, and have done so.
    Well no, since the unlimited data is no longer sold to new customers anymore. The people who still have it were grandfathered in.
    02-08-2012 01:55 PM
  6. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    Ah I see, still really stinks though, and I was going to send the ASA over LOL :lol:

    Oh well, that's that then. :(
    alpinestars1z likes this.
    02-08-2012 01:58 PM
  7. palandri's Avatar
    We just went through this with "Net Neutrality".

    The ruling on net neutrality by the FCC only spoke to home internet connections, not wireless carriers. They have no regulations.

    Home internet providers were basically extorting online movie rental companies, threatening to block their IP unless they paid the home internet provider for bandwidth.

    Of course wireless carriers argued that net neutrality means no government regulations or intervention, so they are free to do whatever they want.

    I am sure with the way the U.S. wireless carriers are currently conducting business, they'll bring regulations upon themselves due to their business practices.
    02-08-2012 02:02 PM
  8. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    I'll have a wee word with 3 and see if they will set up in the US palandri.

    Can you imagine if they successfully launched the same Tariffs as they have here, there ?

    I suspect every other carrier dirty book of tricks would come into play to stop them though.

    Guess they could maybe buy T-Mobile?

    Then I woke up! :(
    02-08-2012 02:08 PM
  9. alpinestars1z's Avatar
    I'll have a wee word with 3 and see if they will set up in the US palandri.

    Can you imagine if they successfully launched the same Tariffs as they have here, there ?
    I wish! I'd be their first customer!
    TheWeeBear likes this.
    02-08-2012 02:23 PM
  10. ninjaap's Avatar
    Hey TheWeeBear, what's a tariff???
    02-08-2012 02:27 PM
  11. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    Sorry ninjaap another UK word I guess. Em I guess you call them plans ?

    I just meant the monthly fee you pay. :)


    Dictionary Entry for Tariff

    A charge or list of charges for services.
    ninjaap likes this.
    02-08-2012 02:29 PM
  12. alpinestars1z's Avatar
    Sorry ninjaap another UK word I guess. Em I guess you call them plans ?
    Yup.
    02-08-2012 02:32 PM
  13. bush715's Avatar
    I'll have a wee word with 3 and see if they will set up in the US palandri.

    Can you imagine if they successfully launched the same Tariffs as they have here, there ?

    I suspect every other carrier dirty book of tricks would come into play to stop them though.

    Guess they could maybe buy T-Mobile?

    Then I woke up! :(
    I have said if anyone bought tmobile and actually invested in it and based plans like uk or european plans they would gain market share extremely quickly
    02-08-2012 02:32 PM
  14. ninjaap's Avatar
    Sorry ninjaap another UK word I guess. Em I guess you call them plans ?

    I just meant the monthly fee you pay.


    Dictionary Entry

    A charge or list of charges for services.
    Oh. Thanks bloke!

    Did I use that word correctly or is that a bad word?
    alpinestars1z likes this.
    02-08-2012 02:33 PM
  15. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    Sorry ninjaap, forgive the foreigner. :blush: :D
    02-08-2012 02:34 PM
  16. alpinestars1z's Avatar
    I have said if anyone bought tmobile and actually invested in it and based plans like uk or european plans they would gain market share extremely quickly
    I think they need to fix customer service so that it's good and consistent, improve their coverage, and get better phones (Windows Phones).
    02-08-2012 02:35 PM
  17. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    No that's fine ninjaap, I'm suitably impressed.

    Well a bloke is a slang word for a male, but we would say 'see that bloke over there' or 'that bloke is nuts.'

    Wouldn't really say thanks bloke. But you done well. :P
    02-08-2012 02:37 PM
  18. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    I have said if anyone bought tmobile and actually invested in it and based plans like uk or european plans they would gain market share extremely quickly
    You'll probably never ever find that out unfortunately bush715. :(
    02-08-2012 02:38 PM
  19. bush715's Avatar
    I think they need to fix customer service so that it's good and consistent, improve their coverage, and get better phones (Windows Phones).
    The biggest thing is invest in a lte network and change the misconception of their so so customer services
    02-08-2012 02:39 PM
  20. alpinestars1z's Avatar
    No that's fine ninjaap, I'm suitably impressed.

    Well a bloke is a slang word for a male, but we would say 'see that bloke over there' or 'that bloke is nuts.'

    Wouldn't really say thanks bloke. But you done well. :P
    So instead of "Thanks bloke," you would say, Thanks ______ ?

    The biggest thing is invest in a lte network and change the misconception of their so so customer services
    It's going to cost quite a lot to invest in an LTE network, but yes, they need to. I haven't had problems with their customer service, but I know other people have which is why I say it needs to be consistent.
    02-08-2012 02:41 PM
  21. ninjaap's Avatar
    Well I think them blokes at ATT need a stern kick in the arse.
    alpinestars1z and TheWeeBear like this.
    02-08-2012 02:42 PM
  22. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    Well I think them blokes at ATT need a stern kick in the arse.
    Absolutely Perfect! :D
    alpinestars1z and ninjaap like this.
    02-08-2012 02:43 PM
  23. TheWeeBear's Avatar
    Oh dear we seem to have hijacked mt1202's thread he won't be pleased. :(

    Quick get back on topic before he comes back. :dry
    alpinestars1z likes this.
    02-08-2012 02:45 PM
  24. bush715's Avatar
    So instead of "Thanks bloke," you would say, Thanks ______ ?



    It's going to cost quite a lot to invest in an LTE network, but yes, they need to. I haven't had problems with their customer service, but I know other people have which is why I say it needs to be consistent.
    I am actually writing a paper on tmobile for my business management final. The biggest thing they could do is get fcc funding for rural broadband development. Also more funding is available for low income plan structures which could be based off of their uk counterparts pricing structure. Both of these would give them some serious money to invest in network upgrades and customer service policy reform
    alpinestars1z likes this.
    02-08-2012 02:50 PM
  25. theefman's Avatar
    We have gone through all this a while back in the UK.

    The ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) stepped in and published it's guidlines on 'Unlimited' claims.

    "Unlimited" Broadband / Mobile Data Rules

    * The term "unlimited" can only be used if the customer incurs no additional charge or suspension of service as a consequence of exceeding a usage threshold associated with a Fair Usage Policy (FUP), a traffic management policy or similar.

    * Limitations that do affect the speed or usage of the service must also be moderate only and clearly explained in the advertisement.


    So in the UK now, you can't get away with saying your service is unlimited if you charge extra after any FUP applies and you MUST explain any limitations in your advertising clearly. It must NOT be in small print.

    Do AT&T mention their throttling / limits at all in any advertising ?

    The ASA have the power to impose huge fines if advertising rules are breached, and have done so.
    Unfortunately, in the US the carriers make their own rules and get away with it.
    02-08-2012 03:01 PM
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