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07-19-2013 10:16 AM
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  1. juanitoriv's Avatar
    iPhone5 killed a 23 y/o flight attendant when she was electrocuted, trying to answer her phone while plugged into the wall. BTW, my boos has an i5, she gets zapped by it constantly

    An S3 blew up in a Swiss teens pocket, hurting her.

    I can see the new ad campaign.

    "Windows Phone, not only is it awesome, but it won't kill you either!"

    I know. Too soon.. 8/

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/app...ry?id=19669136
    Woman Allegedly Electrocuted While Charging iPhone 5
    gab1972 likes this.
    07-16-2013 04:27 AM
  2. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    iPhone5 killed a 23 y/o flight attendant when she was electrocuted, trying to answer her phone while plugged into the wall. BTW, my boos has an i5, she gets zapped by it constantly

    An S3 blew up in a Swiss teens pocket, hurting her.

    I can see the new ad campaign.

    "Windows Phone, not only is it awesome, but it won't kill you either!"

    I know. Too soon.. 8/

    Apple Probes Alleged Deadly iPhone Electrocution - ABC News
    Woman Allegedly Electrocuted While Charging iPhone 5
    How much would you like to gamble on the fact that they've used cheap after market items? Here in the UK an iPhone charger blew up and caused injury to a child. It was cheap knock off and officials went out to collect what they could and try to find where they were coming in from. However you can't stop cheap stuff coming into the country. Expect more stories like this in the future.

    I also wouldn't be surprised to hear something similar in regards to WP in the future.

    News outlets like to make big headlines about big companies when things go wrong. They make claims a never retract them even once the company is in the clear. This is why I hate today's journalism.
    07-16-2013 04:42 AM
  3. Ray Adams's Avatar
    Just a joke:

    Lumia 920 can easily kill if you throw the phone from the second floor directly on head! :)
    07-16-2013 05:02 AM
  4. juanitoriv's Avatar
    How much would you like to gamble on the fact that they've used cheap after market items? Here in the UK an iPhone charger blew up and caused injury to a child. It was cheap knock off and officials went out to collect what they could and try to find where they were coming in from. However you can't stop cheap stuff coming into the country. Expect more stories like this in the future.

    I also wouldn't be surprised to hear something similar in regards to WP in the future.

    News outlets like to make big headlines about big companies when things go wrong. They make claims a never retract them even once the company is in the clear. This is why I hate today's journalism.
    I'll give you that. However, the devices themselves should be shielded against such issues. Phones shouldn't be blowing up or shocking people. Period!!!
    07-16-2013 05:18 AM
  5. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    I'll give you that. However, the devices themselves should be shielded against such issues. Phones shouldn't be blowing up or shocking people. Period!!!
    First, let me straighten some things out here. I know electricity rather well, I'm in the electrical industry. I also know electronics well and I've worked in various fields so I can safely say I know what I'm talking about.

    The incident that I mentioned in the UK involved a poorly designed plug, everything about it did not meet electrical standards. So was basically a ticking time bomb. Someone was bound to get hurt.

    In this instance (iPhone), my guess would be that there's a cheap plug involved that doesn't meet standards, the 220VAC probably jumped across to the USB side of the charger and thus causing the electrical shock at the other end. This is easily done if the internal wiring at the plug is not up to standards. Phones are not designed to take 220VAC and if it's a possible short of some sort it could be lethal. The iPhone has a aluminum case so if the charging cable is faulty there's a very high chance that it will charge the phone case causing a shock. Even if the 220VAC didn't jump you can still get a shock off the USB voltage, it just won't be dangerous. I should also mention the possibility of a short across the grounding/earthing terminal, which could energize the casing of the phone.

    With regards to the battery one, it's probably an after market battery. In the past they had issues like this where people were replacing the batteries in their phones with cheap ones off eBay. They had a reputation of blowing up. Batteries can explode if not made correctly. Yes I have experience with batteries too.

    So with an influx in cheap knock-offs and people buying them you have a potential for many things going wrong and people getting hurt. It is naive in the extreme to think that buying a 'cheap' replacement is the same as a quality one. Electricity is dangerous, even 120VAC can and will kill you so don't be fooled.
    ttsoldier, jmshub, neo158 and 6 others like this.
    07-16-2013 05:41 AM
  6. shane francis's Avatar
    Just a joke:

    Lumia 920 can easily kill if you throw the phone from the second floor directly on head! :)
    lmao
    07-16-2013 05:51 AM
  7. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Just a joke:

    Lumia 920 can easily kill if you throw the phone from the second floor directly on head! :)
    Very true! I jokingly call mine a brick and after I had it land on pavement and not break or scratch even I realized I had a lethal weapon!
    Muessig likes this.
    07-16-2013 05:52 AM
  8. juanitoriv's Avatar
    My aluminum Radar was like that. Then my 8X just spoke to me.
    07-16-2013 06:24 AM
  9. juanitoriv's Avatar
    FYI. The AC vs DC standard, the main reason we have 110/220AC wired into our homes, was not about costs to generate, transmission, efficiency, etc., as MOST consumer goods need that AC transformed to DC (the little "box" at the end off the plug) but because it was lobbied to be a much cleaner/humane way to execute prisoners in the electric chair.

    Just sayin.

    8)
    07-16-2013 06:38 AM
  10. Chregu's Avatar
    FYI. The AC vs DC standard, the main reason we have 110/220AC wired into our homes, was not about costs to generate, transmission, efficiency, etc., as MOST consumer goods need that AC transformed to DC (the little "box" at the end off the plug) but because it was lobbied to be a much cleaner/humane way to execute prisoners in the electric chair.

    Just sayin.

    8)
    That's nonsense.

    Read this for an overview: HowStuffWorks "Direct Current Versus Alternating Current"

    In the little text box is some information about what you are most likely referring to. Just to let you know, AC is used in Switzerland, we burned witches but we certainly never electrocuted anybody ;-)
    xandros9, a5cent and jmshub like this.
    07-16-2013 07:03 AM
  11. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    FYI. The AC vs DC standard, the main reason we have 110/220AC wired into our homes, was not about costs to generate, transmission, efficiency, etc., as MOST consumer goods need that AC transformed to DC (the little "box" at the end off the plug) but because it was lobbied to be a much cleaner/humane way to execute prisoners in the electric chair.

    Just sayin.

    8)
    Sigh, incorrect again. First, high voltage DC will kill you just as quickly as AC. DC actually makes muscles contract where as the alternating properties of AC voltages has the ability to 'throw' you. In the old days prior to excessive safety standards electricians use to use the back of their hands to test for live on open busbar systems. It's not the voltage that kills, it's the current. Voltage is what penetrates the skins resistance allowing for electrical conductivity within the body. Your skin resistance is actually higher than your internals. It takes less than 1 amp to kill you. Anything under 50V is technically considered 'safe'.

    DC was untenable at the early stages of electricity, the issue was with abilities to run it long distances (transform and distribute) and the size and properties of the cable required to do so. The other issue was generation of DC. AC is fairly easy to generate. However saying that there is now calls for HVDC applications for cross country cabling. The ability to covert from AC to DC and back again is somewhat cost effective. A lot of the issues pertaining to HVAC would be diminished. That's not saying HVDC is necessarily safer, it will kill you, but over all the cabling cost and engineering simplicity might be something we'll see coming in the near future.

    Any more electrical questions?
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 07-17-2013 at 03:17 AM.
    neo158, LeLee092, jmshub and 1 others like this.
    07-16-2013 07:12 AM
  12. juanitoriv's Avatar
    Again, truths. But how does that negate what I said?? We liked to kill people to show people that killing people is wrong here in the States..
    07-16-2013 07:57 AM
  13. Tonchi91's Avatar
    High voltage is nothing if it doesn't have enough ampers. High voltage itself will not kill you.
    07-16-2013 08:07 AM
  14. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Again, truths. But how does that negate what I said?? We liked to kill people to show people that killing people is wrong here in the States..
    I checked out wikipedia in regards to your statements. The AC/DC current wars was similar to VHS and BETA or Blu-ray and HD DVD. Though the electric chair was used as a promotion of AC (first application) originally a lot of technical reasons were also raised, as I pointed out. So really it was one among many reasons. Regardless, AC or DC would kill someone rather quickly. In truth I personally believe DC would probably do it quicker. Thankfully the electric chair is slowly going into disuse. I wish capital punishment would go the same way. But that's a whole other discussion.

    As for the conversion part, electronics is 'new' to the scene and weren't really a consideration when electricity was developed. Yes having DC in a home would make things a lot easier in this day and age. Though saying that I don't see DC as a better overall solution.
    raccoon210 and Laura Knotek like this.
    07-16-2013 08:17 AM
  15. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    High voltage is nothing if it doesn't have enough ampers. High voltage itself will not kill you.
    As I stated above it takes just under 1 amp to kill you. You do however need enough voltage to get the electricity into you. You don't find many high voltage and low current applications (meaning below 1 amp) aside from tasers. Just a note, all HV is 'low current' on the grand scheme of things though more than enough to kill you.
    07-16-2013 08:23 AM
  16. hopmedic's Avatar
    Very true! I jokingly call mine a brick and after I had it land on pavement and not break or scratch even I realized I had a lethal weapon!
    The important question is, "How much did the street department charge you for repairs to the road?"
    07-16-2013 12:51 PM
  17. Coolknight1968's Avatar
    No. I think some are missing the point. This iPhone accident occurred in a very humid environment. It is not impossible that excessive humidity in the transformer (charger) allowed the regular voltage current to jump to the USB cable. I think, this could happen with any charger in such an environment. Then, if your phone pinches you with a discharge which is not electro static no matter what mobile phone, Return The Thing!
    As to the accident in China, don't charge your device in a humid place, it is basic that water conducts electricity pretty well.
    07-16-2013 01:05 PM
  18. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    No. I think some are missing the point. This iPhone accident occurred in a very humid environment. It is not impossible that excessive humidity in the transformer (charger) allowed the regular voltage current to jump to the USB cable. I think, this could happen with any charger in such an environment. Then, if your phone pinches you with a discharge which is not electro static no matter what mobile phone, Return The Thing!
    As to the accident in China, don't charge your device in a humid place, it is basic that water conducts electricity pretty well.
    I highly doubt that humidity had anything to do with. Gap distances in a standard charging plug are more than sufficient to handle most environmental conditions. We're talking low voltages here, jumping gaps is not easy. It's quite obvious that the plug or cable or both was faulty. They're saying the phone was bought in an Apple store but nothing about the charger as of yet.

    Possibly the reason she died is due to the humid environment or if she had wet hands/feet. You create an environment where your body resistance is lowered and the voltage can easily penetrate. It really comes down to the path the voltage took. If the path of least resistance was across the heart, then you're most likely dead, if it's your foot you may live, with maybe a toe missing. Jewelry isn't a good thing either.

    As for getting zapped by a charging phone, you can easily get zapped by your USB cable by putting your finger on it while plugged in. Not a lethal voltage but you can feel it.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    07-16-2013 02:09 PM
  19. anon(6038817)'s Avatar
    You have greater odds of being struck by lightning or dying in a car crash than being electrocuted to death by your iPhone or having your Android phone blow up in your pocket.

    Just a little perspective, here.
    07-16-2013 03:26 PM
  20. index1366's Avatar
    True, but using the stock or official chargers and other power equipment, let that be just an external battery will keep you safe from blowing you head off or detonating your pelvis from the pocket.. Although we don't know if she did actually use 3rd party equipment, it's the most possible reason. Oh, and the iPhone is partially made of aluminium, so it electrocuted her easily, the plastic/polycarbonate on WP isn't a conductor, so I agree with the topic creator.. :P.
    juanitoriv likes this.
    07-16-2013 03:43 PM
  21. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    You have greater odds of being struck by lightning or dying in a car crash than being electrocuted to death by your iPhone or having your Android phone blow up in your pocket.

    Just a little perspective, here.
    I disagree with the lightning but agree with the car crash. You can easily avoid being struck by lightning by not being out in it. If there is a bad storm brewing, get indoors also don't believe that nonsense about not going under trees, you're more likely to survive under a tree than being out in a field.

    Having a faulty device is greater possibility in a world where we carry and use electrical devices. Standards are high in consumer products but all it takes is low quality products and you have issues, which is what we're going to see more of.
    07-16-2013 03:52 PM
  22. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    True, but using the stock or official chargers and other power equipment, let that be just an external battery will keep you safe from blowing you head off or detonating your pelvis from the pocket.. Although we don't know if she did actually use 3rd party equipment, it's the most possible reason. Oh, and the iPhone is partially made of aluminium, so it electrocuted her easily, the plastic/polycarbonate on WP isn't a conductor, so I agree with the topic creator.. :P.
    I already pointed out the aluminium case as a probably cause as it's a good conductor. 220VAC will easily kill you I'm just surprised that it was at such a high level. That indicates to me that it completely bypassed the rectification at full current. Most likely a fault condition that didn't destroy the charging unit nor trip the breaker and induced a high enough voltage and current to cause death. That's pretty frightening.

    I think I'll stay away from third party chargers. Though I normally wireless charge or USB on my work computer so pretty safe.
    07-16-2013 03:57 PM
  23. juanitoriv's Avatar
    True, but using the stock or official chargers and other power equipment, let that be just an external battery will keep you safe from blowing you head off or detonating your pelvis from the pocket.. Although we don't know if she did actually use 3rd party equipment, it's the most possible reason. Oh, and the iPhone is partially made of aluminium, so it electrocuted her easily, the plastic/polycarbonate on WP isn't a conductor, so I agree with the topic creator.. :P.
    Thank you so much for getting my intended point!!!

    8)
    07-16-2013 07:46 PM
  24. juanitoriv's Avatar
    True, but using the stock or official chargers and other power equipment, let that be just an external battery will keep you safe from blowing you head off or detonating your pelvis from the pocket.. Although we don't know if she did actually use 3rd party equipment, it's the most possible reason. Oh, and the iPhone is partially made of aluminium, so it electrocuted her easily, the plastic/polycarbonate on WP isn't a conductor, so I agree with the topic creator.. :P.
    Thank you so much for getting my intended point!!!

    8)
    07-16-2013 07:46 PM
  25. NTUser's Avatar
    An S3 blew up in a Swiss teens pocket, hurting her.
    In case of emergency, your Samsuck Galaxy S3 can be used as an incendiary device.

    Seriously though I hope she's ok and it doesn't happen to anyone else.
    LMZR, juanitoriv and Rassva like this.
    07-16-2013 11:04 PM
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