Nokia = better battery?

altoids2011

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For my next phone, id like to find one that i can get atleast 8 hrs of continuous podcast listening for my job [on bluetooth headphones], so idk what that translates to for idle time...

Considering you can achieve those numbers on pure video playback on Android phones, you can most definitely do that with podcasts on any phone available really. Podcasts are no different than music playback, which manufacturers quote in the dozens of hours usually. I would be more concerned about the bluetooth headphones. Those things last at most 8-10 hours before needing a charge...


Considering any Nokia phone will still have identical hardware as the other manufacturers
(same processor type, chipset, radios, etc.) and their use of AMOLED means it won't do much better than the Focus or Omnia 7, I don't really see any wiggle room at all. The only reason they were known for battery life was because of their slow processors and the Symbian OS itself, which could be heavily integrated with the hardware at a low level.

The good things that Nokia will bring to the table that separate them from the other manufacturers would be things like great build quality, stellar optics. Also two very important and highly ignored aspects that Nokia seems to not forget about: audio recording quality and speaker quality. My $700 phone already feels cheap when Samsung decides to skimp on the speaker in order to unnecessary slim it down, making my ears hurt from the crackling of any ringtone that is higher grade than 8-bit beeps and bloops. Not to mention speakerphone or music playback... Then there's of course video recording accompanied with awful audio. Probably the one thing many cellphones haven't caught up with dedicated Flip cameras yet. Don't want to save memories of robot-voiced family and friends. Or upload something cool on Youtube and have it sound barely intelligible..
 
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Abacaxi

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For some reason, from all my cell phones I have used, the Nokia ones always had the longest battery duration. Maybe it is just the experience that gives them a technological advance on that field, no idea.
 

cdook

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Nokia could always stick a bigger battery in the phone and get better battery life. The Focus is a pretty thin phone, you could probably make it slightly thicker with a bigger battery without causing an uproar.
 

altoids2011

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Every manufacturer seems to be obsessed with thinness, meaning as long as it can last about a day they don't seem to care about battery size no matter how much we complain. Then there's the strange eccentricities, like HTC always putting small 1200mah batteries in their large power-hungry Android phones and Samsung being able to cram 1650/1750mah ones in their skinny phones. They are all limited by their desire for thinness. Considering the Sea Ray/N9 body is one unibody piece with no way to access the battery, which means there should be more available room, and it is 12.1mm (to accommodate the camera) which is thicker than other flagship phones with even bigger batteries (1750mah Infuse @ 9mm), I don't know what else is taking up space inside it and why Nokia can't opt for a bigger battery. unless Nokia probably doesn't have Samsung's engineering prowess for cramming things tightly.
 

Dark Mirage

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Better battery life at that point may be a cumulative effect of apps being written for Mango/Apollo which have natively more aggressive power conservation and the processors being a bit lower specced than Android. It'll be interesting to see instances of where Mango's power management becomes a hindrance for us power users. I think Microsoft's set some excellent goals but I do think it's inevitable that the compromises they've made will be more apparent to those of us who really demand our devices do a lot. It'll also be interesting to see what hacks work around these methods, and the actual versus perceived benefits they provide.

Frankly, I'd just be happy if someone made a great phone with a BIG FREAKING BATTERY. I don't care if it's user accessible or not. Go the iPhone 4 route, reduce the internals, as much as possible, and use a bigger battery. Kudos to Microsoft for making a smarter mobile OS that watches power consumption. But there's only so much that that, and more efficient components can do, and batteries aren't going to increase in power any time soon.

See, but this is what annoys me. For 1mm of extra phone thickness, Samsung was able to jack the Galaxy S II battery from 1650mAh to 2000mAh. WHY THE **** DON'T THEY JUST DO THAT FROM THE BEGINNING!?

1mm is PALTRY. Considering the significant power boost you get, 1mm is a small sacrifice to make. I honestly believe that OEMs could easily provide far more battery life than they currently are at minimal sacrifice to phone size. It really doesn't cost all that much extra either.

The complete lack of willingness to give us significant battery life at the get go is baffling.
 

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