Quality degradation after use slow motion video mode

frank zhao

New member
Sep 13, 2014
34
0
0
Visit site
That is normal behavior?
Looks horrible...

I had upload screenshots:
If at night, that will more horrible, I will upload night sample later.
wp_ss_20140919_0003.jpg
wp_ss_20140919_0004.jpg

Follow sample video for 3 mode:

FHD:
H264, 19619.6kbps, 1920?1080, 59.6fps
MP4A, 193.8kbps, 48.0kHz 32bit

Slow Motion:
H264, 8406.5kbps, 1280?720, 120.0fps

Normal:
H264, 19285.5kbps, 1920?1080, 24.2fps
MP4A, 193.8kbps, 48.0kHz 32bit
 
Last edited:

WanderingTraveler

New member
Dec 23, 2012
4,974
0
0
Visit site
Okay, could you explain the problem (and upload some proof, too, while you're at it), if you can?

This seems like a hardware fault to me, but I don't have a lot to go off of.
 

frank zhao

New member
Sep 13, 2014
34
0
0
Visit site
I don't known whether that is a issue, only feel video quality very lower by slow motion mode. If that is normal, that mode so badly. Only my opinion.
 

Adrynalyne

New member
Aug 30, 2014
344
0
0
Visit site
I don't known whether that is a issue, only feel video quality very lower by slow motion mode. If that is normal, that mode so badly. Only my opinion.


Are you talking about the flickering? That is normal. Artificial lighting sources all flicker to some degree and the camera is picking it up because it is shooting at a much higher than normal frame per second rate. That and slow motion video tends to be lower in quality to begin with.

This is a documented issue, even with high end cameras. You need a better light source...like daylight. This is not an issue with HTC nor Windows Phone.

http://www.red.com/learn/red-101/slow-motion-video

Flickering. Artificial lighting is much more likely to flicker at higher frame rates; always try to shoot under bright daylight or continuous studio lighting when possible. See the tutorial on flicker-free shutter speeds for additional tips.

Motion Blur. Viewers typically expect to see minimal motion blur with slow motion, so shutter angles smaller than the standard 180? may be necessary. However, without extra lighting this may require larger apertures and higher ISO speeds, which may come at the expense of sharpness and noise.

Detail. Shooting at very high frame rates typically requires lower resolution. It’s therefore more critical than ever that these images have the highest quality possible. For example, light permitting, stopping the lens down by 1-2 stops will improve sharpness. In post, using the unsharp mask and denoise tools can also help. Most importantly though, use the highest quality lenses available.
 

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
322,447
Messages
2,242,022
Members
427,924
Latest member
Christina Bellot