1. patricksmangan's Avatar
    Would nokia phones running windows phone os get better battery life than the other windows phones?
    06-26-2011 12:45 AM
  2. Luisraul924's Avatar
    Would nokia phones running windows phone os get better battery life than the other windows phones?
    This is hard to answer definitively, but my speculation is, no. The OS for the most part will remain the same apart from a few added services, so, same OS same battery usage. The battery drain will rely on what every other Windows Phone relies on; hardware. Size and type of screen, brightness settings, size of battery in terms of mAh etc.
    06-26-2011 02:21 AM
  3. dtboos's Avatar
    Nokia does have some of the best battery life in the business though, and a lot of that is from decades of engineering and experimenting. I would say that a high end Nokia Windows Phone will be more efficient than you see in manufacturers like HTC & Samsung using the same screen size & battery, as there is also the quality of engineering which has an effect on battery efficiency.

    How well it utilizes the battery & how little waste it has can be different depending on the design & specifications. Just like a car or anything else. It can have the same horsepower & size engine, the same size frame, and one will be more gas efficient. One of the reasons I was excited about Nokia coming on board was their battery efficiency in addition to the build quality and cameras on their upper end devices.
    06-26-2011 11:38 AM
  4. Luisraul924's Avatar
    Nokia does have some of the best battery life in the business though, and a lot of that is from decades of engineering and experimenting. I would say that a high end Nokia Windows Phone will be more efficient than you see in manufacturers like HTC & Samsung using the same screen size & battery, as there is also the quality of engineering which has an effect on battery efficiency.

    How well it utilizes the battery & how little waste it has can be different depending on the design & specifications. Just like a car or anything else. It can have the same horsepower & size engine, the same size frame, and one will be more gas efficient. One of the reasons I was excited about Nokia coming on board was their battery efficiency in addition to the build quality and cameras on their upper end devices.
    True, however that's when Nokia makes them... I have a selling that the quality we've come to expect from Nokia will not make it into Windows Phone: http://www.mobiletechworld.com/2011/06/24/compal-becomes-windows-phone-7-odm-will-fulfill-nokia-and-acer-orders/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Mobiletechworld+%28MobileTechWorld%29
    06-26-2011 01:22 PM
  5. jimski's Avatar
    Compal will have nothing to do with battery life. They are simply the assembler. Like a Toyota plant building a GM car. Actually I think something like that is already happening somewhere. Sharing resources to reduce costs. It's simple economics.

    Sent from my HTC Surround using Board Express
    06-26-2011 05:40 PM
  6. Luisraul924's Avatar
    Compal will have nothing to do with battery life. They are simply the assembler. Like a Toyota plant building a GM car. Actually I think something like that is already happening somewhere. Sharing resources to reduce costs. It's simple economics.

    Sent from my HTC Surround using Board Express
    Yeah I gathered that from my other thread lol. Regardless though manufacturers like HTC and Samsung aren't complete idiots, of course they strive for battery life as well when testing the OS on their devices, and these OEMs have had more time with Windows Phone than Nokia in general, so I don't believe Nokia will be pulling miracles here. I can understand why their battery life was so great with their own operating system, that's because they wrote it themselves and have had such a long time coding for it. Windows Phone is a new endeavor and even if Microsoft gave them more info than they gave regular OEMs, word doesn't beat experience. So when Nokia launches chances are it'll have a similar battery life as these HTC and Samsung second wave devices coming out, or only ever so slightly better that most people won't notice it. Wave 3 of devices running Apollo sometime in late 2012 yes I might believe better battery life but not with mango.
    06-26-2011 08:53 PM
  7. jimski's Avatar
    Don't know how much Nokia can tweak on the WP OS to optimize the battery, but I suppose battery drain can be attributed to to following:
    -Screen
    -Processor
    -GSM/CDMA Radio
    -WiFi Radio
    -BT Radio
    -GPS Chip
    -Memory Access
    -Heat Dissipation
    I think there are things here they can do here to improve battery performance.


    Sent from my HTC Surround using Board Express
    06-27-2011 01:47 AM
  8. dtboos's Avatar
    Yah its not OS optimization they will do, its engineering in the electronics. And the difference may only be a 15-20% difference from manufacturers like HTC/Samsung, but Nokia does put a lot more emphasis on good battery life.

    Similar to their use of high quality lenses as opposed to just enough to get the job done. Nokia prides itself in a few areas, and being good business phones with good battery life is one of them. So I guess we will wait and see, but I am excited for multiple reasons with Nokia coming on board.
    Last edited by dtboos; 06-27-2011 at 10:43 AM.
    06-27-2011 10:37 AM
  9. Luisraul924's Avatar
    I agree with both of you jimski and dtboos I'm really excited about Nokia devices and I understand Nokia can tweak a lot more than the original launch partners. Do I think that'll happen? No Nokia is a bit busy trying work as quickly as they can to get their first device on the market, does that mean it'll be a crappy device? Most certainly not, but I'm more than positive that once they have more time and less pressure on them, then they'll get things running a lot better than HTC, Samsung, LG and others. It is, however only my opinion, and in a world where one man's opinion is worth nothing, I guess it doesn't matter.
    06-27-2011 01:25 PM
  10. Rico's Avatar
    Wave 3 of devices running Apollo sometime in late 2012 yes I might believe better battery life but not with mango.
    Better battery life at that point may be a cumulative effect of apps being written for Mango/Apollo which have natively more aggressive power conservation and the processors being a bit lower specced than Android. It'll be interesting to see instances of where Mango's power management becomes a hindrance for us power users. I think Microsoft's set some excellent goals but I do think it's inevitable that the compromises they've made will be more apparent to those of us who really demand our devices do a lot. It'll also be interesting to see what hacks work around these methods, and the actual versus perceived benefits they provide.

    Frankly, I'd just be happy if someone made a great phone with a BIG FREAKING BATTERY. I don't care if it's user accessible or not. Go the iPhone 4 route, reduce the internals, as much as possible, and use a bigger battery. Kudos to Microsoft for making a smarter mobile OS that watches power consumption. But there's only so much that that, and more efficient components can do, and batteries aren't going to increase in power any time soon.
    06-27-2011 11:14 PM
  11. Luisraul924's Avatar
    and batteries aren't going to increase in power any time soon.
    This is the biggest pain in my *** about smartphone manufacturers. Is that they don't do anything about the batteries they use, whether they build them themselves or have someone else build them either way they should play an active role in trying to get battery tech to advance.
    patricksmangan likes this.
    06-28-2011 12:21 AM
  12. Rico's Avatar
    This is the biggest pain in my *** about smartphone manufacturers. Is that they don't do anything about the batteries they use, whether they build them themselves or have someone else build them either way they should play an active role in trying to get battery tech to advance.
    Current battery tech is an electrochemical process. There's only so much power they can output while still using a process with easily-disposable materials. For the forseable future, it's much easier to make components small and more energy efficient, and of course to do things in software as MS is doing.

    I imagine R&D in battery tech is very expensive; something most phone manufacturers would rather not spend the money in. There's always some new battery tech being discovered, but for one reason or another (economics, safety, etc.) it's not feasible on a large scale.

    And sure, manufacturers could always use bigger batteries in their devices, but first they have to believe there's a demand for it, or that one could be created to make it worthwhile. Then it has to be engineered to fit into a space that can fit multiple models, so it can be massed-produced and reused across devices, reducing costs. Of course there's also concerns for heat dissappation, potential crosstalk with the various radios, and whatnot.

    I think we'll see something like clear solar cells, kinetic chargers or some other method of green "microcharging" (my term) in devices before we see major advancements in battery life. On that note, Nokia discovered a way of turning ambient energy from radio towers and WiFi into a charging solution for phones. Last time I read about it, they were only able to generate something like 5 of the 50 milliwatts from the process they had hoped; with 20 milliwatts being necessary to actually charge a device. I was about a year ago that I read about it, and at the time they planned to bring it to market within five years. I can't imagine that it would hit smartphones first; probably their less power hungry S40 dumbphones, but it's a start.

    None of this changes the fact that I'm sick of my daily (at best) charging. Twenty years from now, I imagine phones will have more than one way of charging, with the cord being the "quick" way to do it, and the other method(s) being more of an trickle charge solution. My phone is wireless in every other respect. Having to plug it in to charge is so... nineties.
    patricksmangan likes this.
    06-28-2011 03:38 AM
  13. Useraid's Avatar
    There are Nokia phones, especially N series phones like the N80, 95 etc which had useless battery life, so who knows.
    07-20-2011 11:56 PM
  14. 1jaxstate1's Avatar
    What type of battery life are you all expecting. With doing so much on my cellphone constantly, I'm happy to make it 8 hours.
    07-21-2011 10:22 PM
  15. Luisraul924's Avatar
    What type of battery life are you all expecting. With doing so much on my cellphone constantly, I'm happy to make it 8 hours.
    That's exactly what I'm saying! I mean yeah Nokia kicks *** and everything but they ain't miracle workers lol I don't expect much more in the battery department.
    07-21-2011 11:10 PM
  16. Duvi's Avatar
    What type of battery life are you all expecting. With doing so much on my cellphone constantly, I'm happy to make it 8 hours.
    My Atrix did 10 hours, easily with poor service at my workplace. 14 hours at home and about when having good service. Both of which I'd have about 30% battery life left.

    So I am hoping and wanting the same or better. My iPhone 4 eats all for dinner when it comes to battery life (minus Nokia devices as I haven't used a smartphone from them recently and can't comment). I can get a day and half with my iPhone.

    Also note, I'm a heavy user. Get tons of email from CrackBerry, my work, personal (notifications from all my social networks), twittering, SMS (had 10K two months ago, haven't checked last month yet) and tons of other stuff. Also thing I don't use on iPhone that would probably make a difference (worse) would be navigation like I do on Android devices.
    07-22-2011 01:21 AM
  17. Rico's Avatar
    There are Nokia phones, especially N series phones like the N80, 95 etc which had useless battery life, so who knows.
    The N95 was a game changer in its day. I forgave the crappy battery life given all the technology packed into that thing.
    07-22-2011 03:10 AM
  18. 1jaxstate1's Avatar
    Right, I actually made it about 10 - 12 hours the other day, but I had a iPhone I was using to play with and listen to music. If people want 15 - 20 hours of non idle battery life, they should go get a old Nokia green screen phone and do nothing but talk on it when needed.
    That's exactly what I'm saying! I mean yeah Nokia kicks *** and everything but they ain't miracle workers lol I don't expect much more in the battery department.
    07-22-2011 10:02 AM
  19. 1jaxstate1's Avatar
    My iPhone is a little better. But I'm pretty sure it's battery has seen better days. The one thing I do notice with the iPhone, is that it charges much much faster than my Focus.
    My Atrix did 10 hours, easily with poor service at my workplace. 14 hours at home and about when having good service. Both of which I'd have about 30% battery life left.

    So I am hoping and wanting the same or better. My iPhone 4 eats all for dinner when it comes to battery life (minus Nokia devices as I haven't used a smartphone from them recently and can't comment). I can get a day and half with my iPhone.

    Also note, I'm a heavy user. Get tons of email from CrackBerry, my work, personal (notifications from all my social networks), twittering, SMS (had 10K two months ago, haven't checked last month yet) and tons of other stuff. Also thing I don't use on iPhone that would probably make a difference (worse) would be navigation like I do on Android devices.
    07-22-2011 10:04 AM
  20. patricksmangan's Avatar
    For my next phone, id like to find one that i can get atleast 8 hrs of continuous podcast listening for my job [on bluetooth headphones], so idk what that translates to for idle time...
    Last edited by Patricksmangan; 08-01-2011 at 07:24 AM.
    07-30-2011 10:11 PM
  21. altoids2011's Avatar
    For my next phone, id like to find one that i can get atleast 8 hrs of continuous podcast listening for my job [on bluetooth headphones], so idk what that translates to for idle time...
    Considering you can achieve those numbers on pure video playback on Android phones, you can most definitely do that with podcasts on any phone available really. Podcasts are no different than music playback, which manufacturers quote in the dozens of hours usually. I would be more concerned about the bluetooth headphones. Those things last at most 8-10 hours before needing a charge...


    Considering any Nokia phone will still have identical hardware as the other manufacturers
    (same processor type, chipset, radios, etc.) and their use of AMOLED means it won't do much better than the Focus or Omnia 7, I don't really see any wiggle room at all. The only reason they were known for battery life was because of their slow processors and the Symbian OS itself, which could be heavily integrated with the hardware at a low level.

    The good things that Nokia will bring to the table that separate them from the other manufacturers would be things like great build quality, stellar optics. Also two very important and highly ignored aspects that Nokia seems to not forget about: audio recording quality and speaker quality. My $700 phone already feels cheap when Samsung decides to skimp on the speaker in order to unnecessary slim it down, making my ears hurt from the crackling of any ringtone that is higher grade than 8-bit beeps and bloops. Not to mention speakerphone or music playback... Then there's of course video recording accompanied with awful audio. Probably the one thing many cellphones haven't caught up with dedicated Flip cameras yet. Don't want to save memories of robot-voiced family and friends. Or upload something cool on Youtube and have it sound barely intelligible..
    Last edited by altoids2011; 08-01-2011 at 12:09 PM.
    08-01-2011 12:00 PM
  22. Abacaxi's Avatar
    For some reason, from all my cell phones I have used, the Nokia ones always had the longest battery duration. Maybe it is just the experience that gives them a technological advance on that field, no idea.
    08-03-2011 07:03 AM
  23. cdook's Avatar
    Nokia could always stick a bigger battery in the phone and get better battery life. The Focus is a pretty thin phone, you could probably make it slightly thicker with a bigger battery without causing an uproar.
    patricksmangan likes this.
    08-03-2011 09:23 AM
  24. altoids2011's Avatar
    Every manufacturer seems to be obsessed with thinness, meaning as long as it can last about a day they don't seem to care about battery size no matter how much we complain. Then there's the strange eccentricities, like HTC always putting small 1200mah batteries in their large power-hungry Android phones and Samsung being able to cram 1650/1750mah ones in their skinny phones. They are all limited by their desire for thinness. Considering the Sea Ray/N9 body is one unibody piece with no way to access the battery, which means there should be more available room, and it is 12.1mm (to accommodate the camera) which is thicker than other flagship phones with even bigger batteries (1750mah Infuse @ 9mm), I don't know what else is taking up space inside it and why Nokia can't opt for a bigger battery. unless Nokia probably doesn't have Samsung's engineering prowess for cramming things tightly.
    09-02-2011 12:47 PM
  25. Dark Mirage's Avatar
    Better battery life at that point may be a cumulative effect of apps being written for Mango/Apollo which have natively more aggressive power conservation and the processors being a bit lower specced than Android. It'll be interesting to see instances of where Mango's power management becomes a hindrance for us power users. I think Microsoft's set some excellent goals but I do think it's inevitable that the compromises they've made will be more apparent to those of us who really demand our devices do a lot. It'll also be interesting to see what hacks work around these methods, and the actual versus perceived benefits they provide.

    Frankly, I'd just be happy if someone made a great phone with a BIG FREAKING BATTERY. I don't care if it's user accessible or not. Go the iPhone 4 route, reduce the internals, as much as possible, and use a bigger battery. Kudos to Microsoft for making a smarter mobile OS that watches power consumption. But there's only so much that that, and more efficient components can do, and batteries aren't going to increase in power any time soon.
    See, but this is what annoys me. For 1mm of extra phone thickness, Samsung was able to jack the Galaxy S II battery from 1650mAh to 2000mAh. WHY THE **** DON'T THEY JUST DO THAT FROM THE BEGINNING!?

    1mm is PALTRY. Considering the significant power boost you get, 1mm is a small sacrifice to make. I honestly believe that OEMs could easily provide far more battery life than they currently are at minimal sacrifice to phone size. It really doesn't cost all that much extra either.

    The complete lack of willingness to give us significant battery life at the get go is baffling.
    09-03-2011 07:01 AM
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