1. iambengreen's Avatar
    Hi,

    Since it's a whole new operating system and all, is the in built Windows Defender and accompanying defenses enough protection in Windows 10 without me having to purchase something like Norton?

    (also, what are peoples opinions on Norton 360?)

    Thanks for the info!
    08-01-2015 10:50 AM
  2. Mellfee's Avatar
    How come no one ever answered this...?
    08-05-2016 04:34 AM
  3. Pete's Avatar
    Because it's a question that gets asked very regularly, and has no real answer.

    The level of protection you need on Windows relates to the amount of risk.

    For users who only installs apps from the Windows Store or well-known web sites and browses known web sites, and employs safe browsing habits, then Defender is all that's needed. This scenario describes the vast majority of users.

    For users who stray off the beaten track and visit the darker areas of the web, then more protection is needed.

    It's the difference between cycling to your local coffee shop or trail-blazing through the Rockies - what's the appropriate clothing to wear?
    08-05-2016 04:56 AM
  4. gold-stars's Avatar
    I'd agree, if your smart and careful you don't need anything more but that said if you just want a little extra protection on top of Windows Defender I'd go with Malware-Bytes the pro version with real time scanner, that is much more pro-active in blocking shady stuff like advertising pack in's in app installers and other malware in general.
    RumoredNow likes this.
    08-05-2016 05:41 AM
  5. jmaga3080's Avatar
    Well, yes it depends on the risk. I noticed that sometimes, using AVG or Avast is worse (idk why), so I just stick with Windows Defender and make sure where I browse to is safe. If you want extra REAL protection, what gold-stars said is right.
    RumoredNow likes this.
    08-05-2016 06:25 AM
  6. etphoto's Avatar
    As everyone else has said. Windows Defender will handle 90% of the risks but if you visit "questionable" sites you might want to explore some paid protection options.

    As for Norton, never been a real fan. I am a webroot fan.
    RumoredNow, ananve and tgp like this.
    08-05-2016 06:41 AM
  7. RumoredNow's Avatar
    I've been running the in-house protection suite for Windows since about 2 years ago. It's much improved over the debut editions and getting better all the time.

    For extra piece of mind, keep the freeware version of malwarebytes on hand as you can always use it in addition. It isn't either/or and does not interfere or conflict with Defender/Firewall/Smart Screen.
    ananve and tgp like this.
    08-05-2016 12:49 PM
  8. AndyCalling's Avatar
    Nah, stick with the built in Windows stuff plus a bit of good sense regarding how you use your device(s). The stand alone malware-bytes can be handy to clean off something if you've had a bad day and been foolish at any point. The alternatives are often so restrictive that they start to impinge on normal computer use, and they can slow things down a fair bit too. Anyone who is doing anything risky enough to bring the idea of a subscription malware service into play should take better steps to isolate their activities from their important stuff.

    The three approaches to take on top of Windows Defender/firewall are:

    1) Make sure you are using a NAT based router (though you should turn off any other 'firewall' protection on it as it doesn't help and often gets in the way, other than NAT and obviously wifi encryption which are essential).

    2) Make regular system image backups to an external HDD which you can disconnect when you're not playing so safe. This can be done with the built-in W10 system image utility. Then you can wipe the system if needs be and be up an running again very swiftly.

    3) This is the key - when you are handling things you know are risky, do so in a virtual machine. After the session, you simply delete the VM concerned. This will minimise the risks significantly.

    Of course, if you're setting things up for someone who you know won't think things through before clicking, you may need to try to buy them some automated system. Just realise you will likely be called in to solve the problems those packages cause instead. Better that you keep a system image on hand to rescue them, so backup whenever you go round to give their PC the regular once-over.
    09-13-2016 08:13 AM
  9. BenIsCool's Avatar
    If you want a peace of mind, just get an antivirus then. Or else, I think Windows Defender would be good enough.
    09-15-2016 11:02 AM
  10. excalibur1814's Avatar
    ... Windows Defender and accompanying defenses enough protection in Windows 10 without me having to purchase something like Norton?
    Even if you did buy Norton you'd probably STILL get a virus or malware.

    Step 1: Gather a lot of common sense. Sniff out those emails and web pages that are bad for you
    Step 2: Stay away from dodgy porn sites and sharing sites or at least locate good ones
    Step 3: You don't have to install Chrome+add block (Seeing as add block now has ads) just use your HOSTS file.
    Step 4: Change IE's pop-up blocker to HIGH. Yes it's set to medium as default which is silly

    Hosts file:
    Using a Hosts File To Make The Internet Not Suck (as much)
    RumoredNow likes this.
    09-16-2016 02:58 AM
  11. themad95's Avatar
    Yes it is definitely enough for normal users.
    09-18-2016 08:14 AM
  12. tgp's Avatar
    Windows Defender will handle 90% of the risks but if you visit "questionable" sites you might want to explore some paid protection options.
    At work we often advise customers by saying that paid protection options might be arguably better, but for the most part the built in Defender is good enough. Some people have used certain antivirus programs for years, and feel uncomfortable with anything else. I personally as a consumer do not like to use a 3rd party option.

    For extra piece of mind, keep the freeware version of malwarebytes on hand as you can always use it in addition. It isn't either/or and does not interfere or conflict with Defender/Firewall/Smart Screen.
    Yes, Malwarebytes is designed to run along side other antivirus programs. We often advise Malwarebytes, whether the customer chooses Windows' built in antivirus or a 3rd party option.
    RumoredNow likes this.
    09-18-2016 11:59 AM
  13. orlbuckeye's Avatar
    Windows Defender: 7 Things You Must Know About Microsoft's Antivirus Solution

    Defender protects you from virus attacks but the most popular attacks are from malware. Basically if the security software area MOST security software that's comes free doesn't do real time protection. Which means it doesn't stop the attack but will remove it after the attack. So periodic scans is important on free security software. Security software (even Malwarebytes) which you purchase give you real time protection and will stop the attack as it happens.
    09-19-2016 07:20 AM
  14. BenIsCool's Avatar
    Windows Defender should be enough for your computer if you are not actively downloading random stuff on the internet (which makes you susceptible to virus).
    09-22-2016 09:56 AM
  15. jsooney's Avatar
    I don't think common sense and staying away from dodgy sites provides sufficient protection.Many legitimate sites get compromised in a number of ways, often without their knowledge. You can have malware in ads, images or other components of a webpage, some of which are not even hosted by the site your visiting. It helps to have something that scans the page and informs you of infected items. There's lots of them but I don't have a particular one I recommend. Realistically you should assume that your PC in infected at all times, because it probably is. AV software in general is not that effective.
    09-22-2016 05:37 PM
  16. aybarrap1's Avatar
    If you employ safe browsing and download habits Defender should provide adequate protection. If you're not comfortable still, then a paid all around protection suite will do the job (but there is still no 100% guarantee). As far as which paid suite you should choose, you will get different opinions. I do use 360 (now just NIS) and like it.
    09-22-2016 09:42 PM
  17. Aamir Mustafa's Avatar
    It is enough for me for 90% time. It works fine.
    09-23-2016 10:11 AM

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