1. dr_Mahmoud's Avatar
    Why Lumia phones lack fm transmitter older Nokia phones used to have it like N8 ?
    12-10-2014 09:23 AM
  2. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Why Lumia phones lack fm transmitter older Nokia phones used to have it like N8 ?
    Because it doesn't?

    Most newer system use Bluetooth? You can use Aux? FM transmitter was never that great to begin with?

    I don't have an answer for you as I'm not the manufacturer and neither is anyone else on here.
    Last edited by N_LaRUE; 12-10-2014 at 09:46 AM.
    dr_Mahmoud and xandros9 like this.
    12-10-2014 09:28 AM
  3. jmshub's Avatar
    I think LaRUE nailed it, there isn't enough demand. Almost every new car of the last several years has Bluetooth and / or aux audio jack. I can't find any phone built today that has an FM transmitter built in. You can still buy FM transmitters that you plug into your cigarette lighter and the headphone jack if that is the only way to get your phone's audio out to your car's speakers.
    12-10-2014 09:36 AM
  4. gpobernardo's Avatar
    Why Lumia phones lack fm transmitter older Nokia phones used to have it like N8 ?
    I believe you're referring to an FM receiver rather than a transmitter.

    International regulation on allowable radiation levels may have had a role here. Newer phones can still tune into FM radio waves through an auxiliary headset where metal in the wires leading to the headset is used to intercept the radio waves. As opposed to older phone models with built-in FM receivers, the radio flux in newer phones is less intense due to the relative length of the wires. Compare this with a built-in receiver that is just a few millimeters across: the smaller the receiver, the more "effort" it needs to receive radio waves which means more power which means more flux, which for cellular (biological) safety reasons may have prompted radiation level regulations.

    This is also the reason why newer phone models have more trouble receiving signals in closed spaces compared with older phone models - a L1020 would already be having troubles inside a concrete room but a Nokia3210 would still display at least "three bars" of signal. You would notice that newer phone models have the antenna either in two separate areas of the phone or spread out around the corners of the device - this is an improvement to the 5-mm diameter single antennas in older phones.
    RumoredNow likes this.
    12-10-2014 09:42 AM
  5. LockOnTech's Avatar
    I think LaRUE nailed it, there isn't enough demand. Almost every new car of the last several years has Bluetooth and / or aux audio jack. I can't find any phone built today that has an FM transmitter built in. You can still buy FM transmitters that you plug into your cigarette lighter and the headphone jack if that is the only way to get your phone's audio out to your car's speakers.
    Unless your bought a vehicles that does not have either of an aux port or bluetooth, if not then the fm transmitters may come in handy; but most people would rather change their whole radio deck unit to an aftermarket one.


    Sent from my iPhone 5s using Tapatalk
    12-10-2014 09:42 AM
  6. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    I believe you're referring to an FM receiver rather than a transmitter.
    Nope they're referring to transmitter. The N8 had FM transmitter that would transmit over FM frequency to your radio.
    12-10-2014 09:45 AM
  7. muvig's Avatar
    i wonder why people prefer using Aux which use cables rather than this FM transmitter, a great feature which just needs tuning just like any Radio station.
    maybe users didn't have enough information about how to use it.
    12-10-2014 09:46 AM
  8. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    i wonder why people prefer using Aux which use cables rather than this FM transmitter, a great feature which just needs tuning just like any Radio station.
    maybe users didn't have enough information about how to use it.
    I used it when I had the N8. It was too fidgety and I prefer Aux over it any day. If you do any type of driving where the stations change frequency then using FM transmitter can be very frustrating at times. It's not very reliable.
    12-10-2014 09:49 AM
  9. jmshub's Avatar
    @LockonTech - Yeah, replacing the head unit is a relatively inexpensive way to get high quality audio from your phone. OP didn't explain his exact situation, about five years ago I worked in a job where I was out on the road a lot in several different cheap company owned cars, several had only an FM stereo. An FM transmitter was the right solution to get music into the car from, at that time, my Zune.

    @gpobernado - There were some Nokia phones that had FM transmitters, to broadcast the phones audio out to be picked up by an in-dash FM radio or whatever. They were low powered and didn't sound that good, but they got the job done.
    gpobernardo likes this.
    12-10-2014 09:49 AM
  10. jmshub's Avatar
    i wonder why people prefer using Aux which use cables rather than this FM transmitter, a great feature which just needs tuning just like any Radio station.
    maybe users didn't have enough information about how to use it.
    The sound quality is much higher if you use the aux audio jack. There is also the inconvenience that if you drive far enough, the FM frequency that you were on could get bleedover from a terrestrial FM station.
    12-10-2014 09:51 AM
  11. rhapdog's Avatar
    Actually, iPhone, Android, and Windows Phones all have the physical FM Transmitter and Receiver inside. Currently, Windows Phone is the only one that has programmed the OS to take advantage of the receiver, and allow you to receive FM signals. There is currently no API for accessing the transmitter, however.

    The FM Transmitter/Receiver is built-in to the chip system, so is integrated in all the smart phones, but it would take changes to the kernel of the OS for Android and iPhone to be able to use them. Android and iPhone don't think it's necessary, because they want people to stream the music from the Internet and run up data charges, which is probably one reason why carriers tend to steer people away from Windows Phone. Well, that, plus being able to download maps on WiFi so you don't have to use data when using the GPS maps.

    As far as FM Transmission goes, don't expect it ever to be implemented, period. Even new home stereos are equipped with Aux in and Bluetooth. Bluetooth gives a better quality transmission without all the static and interference you get with the FM.

    Just go with it. Don't have much of a choice anyway.
    RumoredNow likes this.
    12-10-2014 10:55 AM
  12. gomezz's Avatar
    I use an FM transmitter (Satechi Soundfly) for work as I could be driving any one of several vans which have only basic FM radios with no AUX In or Bluetooth connectivity. Then again I mainly use it with a separate MP3 player as it is quicker and easier to Pause/Play with that than with my Lumia when jumping in and out the van all day long (and would be less of a trauma if it got nicked from the van).
    12-10-2014 04:27 PM
  13. dr_Mahmoud's Avatar
    Yes fm transmitter has a bad sound quality compare to Bluetooth But it isn't battery killer and easy to use not every car has Bluetooth but most of the cars have radio
    12-13-2014 07:41 PM
  14. gomezz's Avatar
    The limiting factor on sound quality is the FM radios in the vans and not the FM transmitter. I did notice that when I changed from using MP3 format to MPA format for the radio recordings that I listen to that I had to back off the gain on my music player a tad to avoid clipping and distortion.
    12-14-2014 06:23 AM

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