09-17-2014 05:50 PM
35 12
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  1. worldspy99's Avatar
    I do not detect that you are a non native speaker but you sound a bit more put together/educated than a typical English speaking poster.

    When I notice overly formal English it is often from India or some Latin American countries. Which is odd considering how prevalent English in those places.
    The reason it sounds formal because we get taught grammar for about 10 years straight from Grade 1 to Grade 10:-) So it is a bit difficult to pick up casual/slang type language especially since we don't speak English at home.
    09-09-2014 10:51 AM
  2. anon(8985111)'s Avatar
    Leo Laporte on twit.tv during the coverage of the Apple keynote: "There's an echo in the line...is the BBC trying to translate this from American into English?"

    Lol :D
    09-09-2014 03:10 PM
  3. anon(8985111)'s Avatar
    Here's another one: Does anyone have an idea what a "level plainfield" could mean? I don't remember the exact context, I think it was somehow related to foreign companies doing business in a specific country. I'm pretty (but not entirely) sure it was rather "plainfield" than "playingfield".
    09-15-2014 05:21 AM
  4. a5cent's Avatar
    Here's another one: Does anyone have an idea what a "level plainfield" could mean? I don't remember the exact context, I think it was somehow related to foreign companies doing business in a specific country. I'm pretty (but not entirely) sure it was rather "plainfield" than "playingfield".
    It was "level playing field"

    I'd understand that to mean that all participants are treated fairly and subject to the same set of rules. The most similar German phrase that comes to my mind is "mit gleich langen Spiessen kmpfen".
    Last edited by a5cent; 09-15-2014 at 07:59 AM. Reason: rechtschreibung
    anon(8985111) likes this.
    09-15-2014 06:00 AM
  5. anon(8985111)'s Avatar
    It was "level playing field"

    I'd understand that to mean that all participants are treated fairly and subject to the same set of rules. The most similar German phrase that comes to my mind is "mit gleich langen spiessen kmpfen".
    Great, that makes sense to me. Just searched for the German counterpart since I haven't heard it being used here in Germany. Seems it's more of a Swiss thing :P Quite reasonable saying though I have to admit...

    Haven't forgotten to edit the first post, just a bit busy at the moment.
    a5cent likes this.
    09-15-2014 08:03 AM
  6. a5cent's Avatar
    Seems it's more of a Swiss thing :P Quite reasonable saying though I have to admit...
    lol, makes sense, considering I live in Switzerland. Any equivalent phrase used in your part of Germany?
    09-15-2014 08:33 AM
  7. anon(8985111)'s Avatar
    lol, makes sense, considering I live in Switzerland. Any equivalent phrase used in your part of Germany?
    Have thought about it for a while, but I don't think so. Must be an old saying, don't know many folks that fight with "Spieen" nowadays :D Which city are you residing in?
    09-15-2014 03:42 PM
  8. a5cent's Avatar
    Have thought about it for a while, but I don't think so. Must be an old saying, don't know many folks that fight with "Spieen" nowadays :D Which city are you residing in?
    The papal Swiss guard?

    wd2.jpg

    info

    As you can see, we tend not to rush into things in these parts. In 50 years we might modernize and go with "gleich langen Schwertern" (swords of the same length) or something like that.

    I'm about 20 minutes SE of Zrich.
    Last edited by a5cent; 09-17-2014 at 05:06 PM. Reason: rechtschreibung
    09-15-2014 04:37 PM
  9. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    It was "level playing field"

    I'd understand that to mean that all participants are treated fairly and subject to the same set of rules. The most similar German phrase that comes to my mind is "mit gleich langen Spiessen kmpfen".
    I can't vouch for the Swiss German but your definition is correct for 'level playing field'.

    I was in Switzerland in August. Very beautiful there.
    09-17-2014 06:06 AM
  10. a5cent's Avatar
    I can't vouch for the Swiss German but your definition is correct for 'level playing field'.

    I was in Switzerland in August. Very beautiful there.
    That was German, not Swiss German. It's just a phrase that apparently isn't used outside Switzerland.

    One of the interesting things about Swiss German is that its one of few languages that doesn't have its own written form. There is no official way of writing Swiss German.

    Anyway, I hope you enjoyed your stay in Switzerland. It's definitely a very beautiful country, particularly if you like the outdoors, spectacular mountain vistas, rushing mountain streams and lake-side towns and cities. But then again, there are a lot of beautiful places on this Earth.

    Last edited by a5cent; 09-18-2014 at 08:34 AM.
    09-17-2014 05:50 PM
35 12

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