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Native English speakers: This thread needs your support

anon(8985111)

New member
Jul 22, 2014
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Great idea! May I suggest that you continually update your first post to reflect the terms that were sorted out? I'm sure that would help many people in the same situation, as they wouldn't have to comb through the entire thread.

Yes, that's a good idea. I am going to implement this soon.

It's good to see all that input coming. Some things seem to be hard to pinpoint but it still helps. If I have the feeling that I'm not sufficiently familiar with an expression I might just leave it out to avoid causing any confusion. And as someone pointed out, I totally agree that it can be a good idea not trying to find the corresponding expression in your native language. I've always found that studying contexts is way more helpful than just learning single words. Unfortunately, many teachers still follow the latter approach which makes the English of foreigners sound very textbook like but not really natural.

This might help you:


It's a compilation of a weekly series of English tips I posted on Facebook 4 years ago to help my Filipino friends improve their English.

Thanks for sharing. The Philippines must be such an amazing place, all Filipinos I've met so far when I'm spending some time in Asia have been unbelievably helpful and friendly people. I've seen a thread about the Filipino community here on WPCentral, will have to check that one out either.
 

a5cent

New member
Nov 3, 2011
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"Christmas is looming" I interpret it as completely neutral.

But isn't that mainly due to the fact that it's pretty much impossible to view Christmas as something negative? If I were to say "Christmas is right around the corner", wouldn't our first emotional associations be ones of optimism and happiness, whereas with it looming, we're just not sure whether to be happy or scared?

I have absolutely nothing to back that up with. Just a hunch (also a non native English speaker here).
 

N_LaRUE

New member
Apr 3, 2013
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But isn't that mainly due to the fact that it's pretty much impossible to view Christmas as something negative? If I were to say "Christmas is right around the corner", wouldn't our first emotional associations be ones of optimism and happiness, whereas with it looming, we're just not sure whether to be happy or scared?

I have absolutely nothing to back that up with. Just a hunch (also a non native English speaker here).

I think you're right personally. I've never heard looming used as neutral or positive myself. Just the word itself has the effect of something ominous.
 

berty6294

New member
Oct 5, 2012
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I think you're right personally. I've never heard looming used as neutral or positive myself. Just the word itself has the effect of something ominous.

I think the fact that it is a word seldom used definitely contributes to it's 'ominous' effect.
 

michail71

New member
Nov 29, 2012
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Yes, that's a good idea. I am going to implement this soon.

It's good to see all that input coming. Some things seem to be hard to pinpoint but it still helps. If I have the feeling that I'm not sufficiently familiar with an expression I might just leave it out to avoid causing any confusion. And as someone pointed out, I totally agree that it can be a good idea not trying to find the corresponding expression in your native language. I've always found that studying contexts is way more helpful than just learning single words. Unfortunately, many teachers still follow the latter approach which makes the English of foreigners sound very textbook like but not really natural.



Thanks for sharing. The Philippines must be such an amazing place, all Filipinos I've met so far when I'm spending some time in Asia have been unbelievably helpful and friendly people. I've seen a thread about the Filipino community here on WPCentral, will have to check that one out either.

I do not detect that you are a non native speaker but you sound a bit more put together/educated than a typical English speaking poster.

When I notice overly formal English it is often from India or some Latin American countries. Which is odd considering how prevalent English in those places.
 

worldspy99

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Nov 10, 2013
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I do not detect that you are a non native speaker but you sound a bit more put together/educated than a typical English speaking poster.

When I notice overly formal English it is often from India or some Latin American countries. Which is odd considering how prevalent English in those places.

The reason it sounds formal because we get taught grammar for about 10 years straight from Grade 1 to Grade 10:) So it is a bit difficult to pick up casual/slang type language especially since we don't speak English at home.
 

anon(8985111)

New member
Jul 22, 2014
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Leo Laporte on twit.tv during the coverage of the Apple keynote: "There's an echo in the line...is the BBC trying to translate this from American into English?"

Lol :D
 

anon(8985111)

New member
Jul 22, 2014
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Here's another one: Does anyone have an idea what a "level plainfield" could mean? I don't remember the exact context, I think it was somehow related to foreign companies doing business in a specific country. I'm pretty (but not entirely) sure it was rather "plainfield" than "playingfield".
 

a5cent

New member
Nov 3, 2011
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Here's another one: Does anyone have an idea what a "level plainfield" could mean? I don't remember the exact context, I think it was somehow related to foreign companies doing business in a specific country. I'm pretty (but not entirely) sure it was rather "plainfield" than "playingfield".

It was "level playing field"

I'd understand that to mean that all participants are treated fairly and subject to the same set of rules. The most similar German phrase that comes to my mind is "mit gleich langen Spiessen k?mpfen".
 
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anon(8985111)

New member
Jul 22, 2014
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It was "level playing field"

I'd understand that to mean that all participants are treated fairly and subject to the same set of rules. The most similar German phrase that comes to my mind is "mit gleich langen spiessen k?mpfen".

Great, that makes sense to me. Just searched for the German counterpart since I haven't heard it being used here in Germany. Seems it's more of a Swiss thing :p Quite reasonable saying though I have to admit...

Haven't forgotten to edit the first post, just a bit busy at the moment.
 

anon(8985111)

New member
Jul 22, 2014
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lol, makes sense, considering I live in Switzerland. Any equivalent phrase used in your part of Germany?

Have thought about it for a while, but I don't think so. Must be an old saying, don't know many folks that fight with "Spie?en" nowadays :D Which city are you residing in?
 

a5cent

New member
Nov 3, 2011
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Have thought about it for a while, but I don't think so. Must be an old saying, don't know many folks that fight with "Spie?en" nowadays :D Which city are you residing in?

The papal Swiss guard?

wd2.jpg

info

As you can see, we tend not to rush into things in these parts. In 50 years we might modernize and go with "gleich langen Schwertern" (swords of the same length) or something like that. :wink:

I'm about 20 minutes SE of Z?rich.
 
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N_LaRUE

New member
Apr 3, 2013
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It was "level playing field"

I'd understand that to mean that all participants are treated fairly and subject to the same set of rules. The most similar German phrase that comes to my mind is "mit gleich langen Spiessen k?mpfen".

I can't vouch for the Swiss German but your definition is correct for 'level playing field'.

I was in Switzerland in August. Very beautiful there.
 

a5cent

New member
Nov 3, 2011
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I can't vouch for the Swiss German but your definition is correct for 'level playing field'.

I was in Switzerland in August. Very beautiful there.

That was German, not Swiss German. It's just a phrase that apparently isn't used outside Switzerland.

One of the interesting things about Swiss German is that its one of few languages that doesn't have its own written form. There is no official way of writing Swiss German.

Anyway, I hope you enjoyed your stay in Switzerland. It's definitely a very beautiful country, particularly if you like the outdoors, spectacular mountain vistas, rushing mountain streams and lake-side towns and cities. But then again, there are a lot of beautiful places on this Earth.

:wink:
 
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