Take RAW pictures to really show off your Icon

onlysublime

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To be honest, I wasn't super happy with the default images taken by the Icon. Sure, they were pretty good... for smartphone pictures...

But after sending the RAW pictures through Adobe Camera Raw, these are truly awesome pictures. Not enough reviews emphasize how good the RAW images are with the Icon camera. I know most people have no idea how to handle RAW but if any of you are willing to experiment with Camera Raw, you'll be able to impress your friends with how good the images the Icon can produce.

Not a lot of cameras have the ability to take RAW images, at least when it comes to a standard included feature. It's something we should more strongly tout.
 

etphoto

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I would think if you want to show off the camera's ability then taking jpg images would do that more than RAW. That's the whole point of RAW, the camera makes no changes to the image. Any camera taking a RAW image would do the same thing.
 

onlysublime

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No, the point of RAW is to capture as much information as possible.

Normally, your camera takes an image and then your camera software runs the pictures through an algorithm to give "best" processed image which is then outputted as JPEG. But a lot of times (most times in my opinion), the final JPEG image outputted is not great. You end up losing detail because that detail was discarded in post-processing.

When you take the RAW and edit it yourself, you'll see how great your images will be. Plus, you'll see detail that you didn't even know your pictures had. If you try to do postprocessing on your JPEGs, you've already lost so much information that it's quite difficult to make your JPEGs look great.

You can almost completely save a badly taken RAW image. With a JPEG, you're almost stuck with a bad photo that you have to discard in the hopes that you took another better image.
 

etphoto

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Normally, your camera takes an image and then your camera software runs the pictures through an algorithm to give "best" processed image which is then outputted as JPEG. But a lot of times (most times in my opinion), the final JPEG image outputted is not great. You end up losing detail because that detail was discarded in post-processing.

When you take the RAW and edit it yourself, you'll see how great your images will be. Plus, you'll see detail that you didn't even know your pictures had. If you try to do postprocessing on your JPEGs, you've already lost so much information that it's quite difficult to make your JPEGs look great.

You can almost completely save a badly taken RAW image. With a JPEG, you're almost stuck with a bad photo that you have to discard in the hopes that you took another better image.

You just made my point. The camera processes the raw image and produces a jpg. A good looking jpg shows you how nicely (or not) your camera (or at least the software inside it) does. Editing a raw image is testament to your editing skills more so then what data is collected by the camera.

From what you are saying you are making more a jpg vs raw argument than how well your cell phone takes a raw image.
 

arbyjr

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No, the point of RAW is to capture as much information as possible.

Normally, your camera takes an image and then your camera software runs the pictures through an algorithm to give "best" processed image which is then outputted as JPEG. But a lot of times (most times in my opinion), the final JPEG image outputted is not great. You end up losing detail because that detail was discarded in post-processing.

When you take the RAW and edit it yourself, you'll see how great your images will be. Plus, you'll see detail that you didn't even know your pictures had. If you try to do postprocessing on your JPEGs, you've already lost so much information that it's quite difficult to make your JPEGs look great.

You can almost completely save a badly taken RAW image. With a JPEG, you're almost stuck with a bad photo that you have to discard in the hopes that you took another better image.
Either way your basically "running you image through a process" too alter the final image. In your case "you" are the process. Sure RAW will give you more options and give YOU the option to make an image great. However, most novice users do not have enough experience working with RAW to actually bring the best out of there images, let along the best programs to allow them to work with RAW.
The camera does a really good job on its own, and this is more than enough for most to be impressed with the quality.

My experience - professional photographer since 1994, and I carry a real camera most of the time, but the Icon does a great job for quick snapshots for facebook, tweeter, social media or family emails...
 

mtalinm

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also, RAW images aren't automatically uploaded whereas the big jpgs are. that's why I switched. oh, and I suck at Lightroom.
 

anon(7901790)

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Adobe Camera Raw isn't recognizing any of my .dng files what am I missing here?

What version are you using? 8.6.0.254 is the latest version.

Edit: I just updated to 8.7.0.309. Keep in mind Adobe Camera Raw is not a stand alone app. It is a plugin that is used by Adobe products such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Bridge; and is baked into Lightroom.
 
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arbyjr

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What version are you using? 8.6.0.254 is the latest version.

Edit: I just updated to 8.7.0.309. Keep in mind Adobe Camera Raw is not a stand alone app. It is a plugin that is used by Adobe products such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Bridge; and is baked into Lightroom.

Gernertti, you did a very nice write up for the differences between RAW and JPG, but this is a perfect example of what I was trying to say earlier in this post.
RAW is and may be a very nice and useful feature, but for most people staying with the JPG file format is probably best!
 

anon(7901790)

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Gernertti, you did a very nice write up for the differences between RAW and JPG, but this is a perfect example of what I was trying to say earlier in this post.
RAW is and may be a very nice and useful feature, but for most people staying with the JPG file format is probably best!

Thanks! Oh I totally agree with you! I did the write up to help people decide whether or not to shoot RAW. RAW capture is so new in smart phones a lot of people are confused to what it actually is.

I shoot RAW DNG on my Icon because I also shoot RAW on my Canon EOS 6D, so using Lightroom, Bridge, and Photoshop is nothing new.

I'm really looking forward to getting Denim...eventually. The new Lumia Camera supposedly has some really nice improvements. Low light capture and camera speed being the two biggest improvements to me.
 
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arbyjr

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For years I have been caring a point and shoot camera. My pocket camera is the Canon G series, and over the years I have moved up to the G1X.
I can't work professionally anymore since the accident, but I still have 2-EOS 1DX cameras in fighting trim, but as stated above the G series cameras are my everyday "pocket cameras". But after switching to the Icon I have been going out with just the phone, and the pictures really are great for a cellphone! At times I just wish for a little more control, and for me I really would like more aperture control, I have always worked in aperture priority, and controlling the depth of field is very important to me.
 

onlysublime

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Adobe Camera Raw isn't recognizing any of my .dng files what am I missing here?

You don't need a recent version for it to recognize the DNG files. In fact, I'm still using Adobe CS5.

Load up Adobe Bridge. Go to your DNG file. Right-click on the file and choose "open in camera raw". Your DNG file should load.

The reason why I recommend Camera Raw above the other options is for simplicity. With Camera Raw, all you need to know how to do is move sliders around. Anyone can move sliders. And the sliders are arranged in order of how you should edit the pictures. So you go from the top slider downward. Because all sliders affect the effects of the other sliders, they arranged the sliders in this sequence to reduce your random guessing.
 

DavidinCT

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I'm really looking forward to getting Denim...eventually. The new Lumia Camera supposedly has some really nice improvements. Low light capture and camera speed being the two biggest improvements to me.

Yea, no question, cant wait for those. A faster camera with be EPIC, The biggest problem with the camera on any Nokia phone (had a 822,928 and a ICON) is the camera is so slow, I almost always miss the "moment", as my wife's iPhone has taken 4 pictures in the same time I take one.

I'm also looking forward to 4K video recording, I will at least have SOME content to play back on my new 4K tv I am getting...that is if we ever get Denim..
 

onlysublime

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have you used ProShot? that is an amazing camera. I use it for all situations except for when I want RAW or want video since it can't do those.

but for everything else, it's superior to Nokia Camera which I have given up on. There's not much that Nokia Camera really really offers. The reframe ability is neat but not really needed much.
 

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