1. wpcontinue's Avatar
    Since your PC, laptop and even surface pro has fans to cool the Intels, how is it possible the same exact OS to run on phone processors as well on laptop and stuff?
    10-02-2014 02:04 AM
  2. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    This is already happening.

    Windows Phone 8 uses the NT kernel. Surface RT uses the NT kernel and lastly, Windows 8 uses the NT kernel. The only thing different is the interfaces and specific drivers required to run the hardware. To use the simplest terms.

    Windows 10 is just making things more consistent across all devices allowing developers to make one Metro app for all devices instead of individual ones for each system. This is the key feature of Windows 10 and has been MS's goal since the change in Windows 8.
    10-02-2014 02:30 AM
  3. wpcontinue's Avatar
    Ok so after all my software can run on the phone why should I need Intels power and fans???
    And since the NT is the same, can I build Win32 windowed like programs for my phone???

    I think all these changes about the OSes being one OS actually are just interface b*ll**** and smoke in the eyes
    10-02-2014 02:53 AM
  4. superunderscore's Avatar
    Don't forget you also have x86/x64 and ARM
    N_LaRUE likes this.
    10-02-2014 02:55 AM
  5. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Ok so after all my software can run on the phone why should I need Intels power and fans???
    And since the NT is the same, can I build Win32 windowed like programs for my phone???

    I think all these changes about the OSes being one OS actually are just interface b*ll**** and smoke in the eyes
    I think you misunderstand some things. Only 'Metro apps' will be cross platform not x86 programs. You won't be running full blown Windows software on your phone as it simply wouldn't be a great idea. Also the reason why you have fans etc is for more powerful software. Don't expect to run high end 3D games or other intensive software on a phone any time soon.

    x86 processors are not the same as ARM processors. The OS backend is the same (the kernel) but the the CPU architecture it runs on is different. For now.

    Maybe one day we'll have portable computers the size of phones that just slot into interfaces to use with lager screens or use wireless technology but we're not there yet.
    10-02-2014 03:04 AM
  6. wpcontinue's Avatar
    The OS backend is the same (the kernel) but the the CPU architecture it runs on is different.
    Why? What is the difference between these two things
    10-02-2014 03:11 AM
  7. superunderscore's Avatar
    Apps interact with the kernel, at his turn the kernel interacts with the CPU.

    here is some info:
    CPU: Central processing unit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Kernel: Kernel (operating system) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    N_LaRUE likes this.
    10-02-2014 03:23 AM
  8. N_LaRUE's Avatar
    Why? What is the difference between these two things
    Well if you want a full explanation I suggest you look up Wikipedia or find some information on the net. To use the simplest terms - one (ARM) is designed for mobile devices, low energy and other mobile technologies. The other (x86) is designed to handle desktop/laptop software and hardware.

    When you're talking OS you're talking software. When you're talking CPU you're talking hardware. You can have the same OS on different types of CPUs and hardware but what those CPUs and hardware are made for are different things.

    Using the term 'architecture' is probably where you're getting confused. There's software architecture and hardware architecture. They are not the same thing.

    Hopefully makes a bit more sense.
    superunderscore likes this.
    10-02-2014 03:24 AM
  9. Aresjr21's Avatar
    My best example to use would be Windows Mobile 6.5 to your Windows Vista.
    10-02-2014 03:25 AM
  10. Expression2's Avatar
    Fact is: Metro apps are compiled in CLI, which is not direct machine code, but is executed by the WinRT Framework instead. WinRT's job is to translate CLI code into machine-specific code. Here's an interesting fact: You can run apps built on the .NET Framework on the Surface RT and Surface 2 and Surface Pros as well but not x86 apps (Only on Surface Pros). Why? Apps on the .NET Framework are compiled in CLI, and on Surface RT, .NET translates that into ARM code that runs on Surface RT; while on Surface Pros, the .NET Framework translates the CLI into x86 code, making .NET apps nearly universal
    11-12-2014 03:44 AM
  11. ohgood's Avatar
    Ok so after all my software can run on the phone why should I need Intels power and fans???
    And since the NT is the same, can I build Win32 windowed like programs for my phone???

    I think all these changes about the OSes being one OS actually are just interface b*ll**** and smoke in the eyes


    good question. the answer is you don't.

    but when you want to edit 4k video, would you prefer changes happen in right now, or lunchtime next week?


    or better yet, wHich x86 programs are you dying to use on your phone?

    I'm betting both answers involved crickets and chirping.
    11-12-2014 04:30 PM
  12. Squachy's Avatar
    Ok so after all my software can run on the phone why should I need Intels power and fans???
    And since the NT is the same, can I build Win32 windowed like programs for my phone???

    I think all these changes about the OSes being one OS actually are just interface b*ll**** and smoke in the eyes
    The underlying difference beyond the software is the hardware architecture that the CPU is built with. Intel uses x86 which is found in pretty much anything nowadays(desktops, tablets, console) Phones and tablets use ARM. These two are incompatible with each other. Since x86 has dominated the desktop space for many years every desktop software is coded for the x86 architecture. These will not run on arm.

    In terms of power, intels are way more powerful but at the same time way more power hungry, which is why they need fans to cool them. Passive cooling will not be sufficient. Arm is the opposite, it's more power efficient but weaker which is why these are found in smaller handheld devices where battery life is a major concern.

    Going back to the app question. If you coded something for win 10 desktop (win32) you can't run that on the phone. However if you coded something using the universal app APIs it will run on all the win10 devices.

    The same underlying NT kernal allows enough of the code to be shared so you don't have to make different versions of one app to support different devices.

    It is the same but it isn't the same.
    I'm not a programmer so I could be wrong on everything but this is just how I understand the whole concept behind the windows 10 and the one os philosophy.
    Karthik Naik likes this.
    11-13-2014 12:48 AM
  13. Karthik Naik's Avatar
    sigh another person who hasnt understood the goal microsoft wants to achieve
    11-13-2014 01:04 AM
  14. Karthik Naik's Avatar
    The underlying difference beyond the software is the hardware architecture that the CPU is built with. Intel uses x86 which is found in pretty much anything nowadays(desktops, tablets, console) Phones and tablets use ARM. These two are incompatible with each other. Since x86 has dominated the desktop space for many years every desktop software is coded for the x86 architecture. These will not run on arm.

    In terms of power, intels are way more powerful but at the same time way more power hungry, which is why they need fans to cool them. Passive cooling will not be sufficient. Arm is the opposite, it's more power efficient but weaker which is why these are found in smaller handheld devices where battery life is a major concern.

    Going back to the app question. If you coded something for win 10 desktop (win32) you can't run that on the phone. However if you coded something using the universal app APIs it will run on all the win10 devices.

    The same underlying NT kernal allows enough of the code to be shared so you don't have to make different versions of one app to support different devices.

    It is the same but it isn't the same.
    I'm not a programmer so I could be wrong on everything but this is just how I understand the whole concept behind the windows 10 and the one os philosophy.
    ^^this guy hit the nail on the head!!
    he isnt a programmer but he understood it exactly!!
    11-13-2014 01:05 AM
  15. ronaldme's Avatar
    Since your PC, laptop and even surface pro has fans to cool the Intels, how is it possible the same exact OS to run on phone processors as well on laptop and stuff?
    Because basically it is not the exact OS. A lot of core elements will be the same, but the OS not. Each OS version (ARM, x86/64) will implement the libraries for running the same apps, but the low layer of the OS will be different.
    11-13-2014 03:45 PM
  16. An_dz's Avatar
    The underlying difference beyond the software is the hardware architecture that the CPU is built with. Intel uses x86 which is found in pretty much anything nowadays(desktops, tablets, console) Phones and tablets use ARM. These two are incompatible with each other. Since x86 has dominated the desktop space for many years every desktop software is coded for the x86 architecture. These will not run on arm.

    In terms of power, intels are way more powerful but at the same time way more power hungry, which is why they need fans to cool them. Passive cooling will not be sufficient. Arm is the opposite, it's more power efficient but weaker which is why these are found in smaller handheld devices where battery life is a major concern.

    Going back to the app question. If you coded something for win 10 desktop (win32) you can't run that on the phone. However if you coded something using the universal app APIs it will run on all the win10 devices.

    The same underlying NT kernal allows enough of the code to be shared so you don't have to make different versions of one app to support different devices.

    It is the same but it isn't the same.
    I'm not a programmer so I could be wrong on everything but this is just how I understand the whole concept behind the windows 10 and the one os philosophy.
    ^^this guy hit the nail on the head!!
    he isnt a programmer but he understood it exactly!!
    And he doesn't seem to be a "hardware" engineer either.
    The emotion was so big that I almost cried here.
    11-13-2014 08:40 PM

Similar Threads

  1. No LIVING IMAGES ON 1020 CYAN IN INDIA
    By Anant Anand in forum Windows Phone 8.1
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-04-2014, 08:10 AM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-02-2014, 09:20 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-02-2014, 01:47 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-02-2014, 01:45 AM
  5. Windows 10 for phone
    By faisalbaba in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-02-2014, 12:27 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD